• DroughtView: Satellite-based Drought Monitoring and Assessment

      Weiss, Jeremy; Crimmins, Michael (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-05)
      Remotely sensed data are valuable for monitoring, assessing, and managing impacts to arid and semi-arid lands caused by drought or other changes in the natural environment. With this in mind, we collaborated with scientists and technologists to redevelop DroughtView, a web-based decision-support tool that combines satellite-derived measures of surface greenness with additional geospatial data so that users can visualize and evaluate vegetation dynamics across space and over time. To date, users of DroughtView have been local drought impact groups, ranchers, federal and state land management staff, environmental scientists, and plant geographers. Potential new applications may include helping to track wildland fire danger. Here, we present the functionality of DroughtView, including new capabilities to report drought impacts and share map information, as well as the data behind it.
    • Living with Wildfire: Homeowners' Firewise Guide for Arizona

      Jones, Christopher; Rogstad, Alix; Campbell, Stephen; Peters, David; Aylor, Dustie; Pearlberg, Clifford; Wood, Judith; Peacock, Wendell; Elek, Arthur; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2007)
      This publication is an update and adaptation of the widely distributed Living with Fire publication created by the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and Sierra Front Wildfire Cooperators in 1998. It is an interagency collaboration of the Arizona Firewise subcommittee of the Arizona Interagency Coordinating Group. It involved the combined efforts of the Arizona State Land Department, USDI Bureau of Indian Affairs, USDI Bureau of Land Management, USDI National Park Service, USDA Forest Service, USDI Fish and Wildlife Service, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, University of Arizona Cooperative Extension and Arizona Fire Chiefs Association. The need to revise the over seven-year old publication emerged from the subcommittees vision of building in concepts such as Firewise Zone Landscaping and Survivable Space, as well as to update the documents appearance and organization. Its purpose to provide a quality outreach tool to increase public aware concerning Firewise concepts and to encourage and facilitate the implementation of Firewise practices by communities, neighborhoods and property owners. Living with Wildfire is a twelve-page color tabloid that addresses the following topic areas important to homeowners: current situation; fire behavior and the human environment, and in various Arizona vegetation types; detailed recommendations for creating survivable space, including a checklist and landscape management zones; frequently asked questions; and emergency and evacuation guidelines. The tabloid is to be printed in bulk by federal partners and made widely available throughout the state over the next several years.
    • Principles of Obtaining and Interpreting Utilization Data on Rangelands

      Ruyle, George B.; Smith, Lamar; Maynard, Jim; Barker, Steve; Stewart, Dave; Meyer, Walt; Couloudon, Bill; Williams, Stephen; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-10)
      A primary expression of stocking levels on rangeland vegetation is utilization defined as the proportion or degree of current years forage production that is consumed or destroyed by animals (including insects). Utilization may refer either to a single plant species, a group of species, or the vegetation as a whole. Utilization is an important factor in influencing changes in the soil, water, animal, and vegetation resources. The impact of a specific intensity of use on a plant species is highly variable depending on past and present use, period of use, duration of use, inter-specific competition, weather, availability of soil moisture for regrowth, and how these factors interact. Utilization data can be used as a guideline for moving livestock within an allotment with due consideration to season, weather conditions and the availability of forage and water in pastures scheduled for use during the same grazing season. In combination with actual use and climatic data, utilization measurements on key areas and utilization pattern mapping are useful for estimating proper stocking levels under current management. Utilization studies are helpful in identifying key and problem areas, and in identifying range improvements needed to improve livestock distribution. Reviewed 10/2016. Originally published 5/2007.
    • Principles of Obtaining and Interpreting Utilization Data on Rangelands

      Ruyle, George B.; Smith, Lamar; Maynard, Jim; Barker, Steve; Stewart, Dave; Meyer, Walt; Couloudon, Bill; Williams, Stephen; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2007-05)
      A primary expression of stocking levels on rangeland vegetation is utilization defined as the proportion or degree of current years forage production that is consumed or destroyed by animals (including insects). Utilization may refer either to a single plant species, a group of species, or the vegetation as a whole. Utilization is an important factor in influencing changes in the soil, water, animal, and vegetation resources. The impact of a specific intensity of use on a plant species is highly variable depending on past and present use, period of use, duration of use, inter-specific competition, weather, availability of soil moisture for regrowth, and how these factors interact. Utilization data can be used as a guideline for moving livestock within an allotment with due consideration to season, weather conditions and the availability of forage and water in pastures scheduled for use during the same grazing season. In combination with actual use and climatic data, utilization measurements on key areas and utilization pattern mapping are useful for estimating proper stocking levels under current management. Utilization studies are helpful in identifying key and problem areas, and in identifying range improvements needed to improve livestock distribution.