• Beet Curly Top Disease (Curtoviruses) in Spinach and Table Beets in Arizona

      Nischwitz, Claudia; Olsen, Mary (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-10)
    • Comandra Blister Rust

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-05)
      Mondell pine should not be planted within a mile of Comandra populations. Infection of pine occurs through needles by spores produced on Comandra, but spores produced on pine cannot re-infect pine. This article gives information about the disease cycle, the symptoms and prevention and control methods for blister rust.
    • Cotton (Texas) Root Rot

      Olsen, Mary W.; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-05)
      Cotton root rot commonly causes a sudden wilt and death of susceptible plants in summer months but may also cause a slow decline, especially at cooler temperatures. So, positive identification of disease by an experienced person is essential. This publication addresses the symptoms, environmental conditions, disease, prevention and control methods, sampling, identifying susceptible plants and the tolerant and immune plants of cotton root rot.
    • Damping Off

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      Damping off is caused by several different fungi under different environmental conditions. The fungi include Pythium, Rhizoctonia solani, and Thielaviopsis basicola. This article discusses the symptoms, environmental conditions, diseases, prevention and control methods for the damping-off caused by fungi.
    • Diseases of Citrus in Arizona

      Olsen, Mary W.; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-04)
      This publication discusses some diseases that are sufficiently important to the citrus in Arizona. Topics include: -Parasitic Diseases -fungi / virus diseases / virus or virus-like diseases -Mycoplasma Diseases -Nematode Diseases -Nonparasitic Diseases
    • Diseases of Citrus in Arizona

      Olsen, Mary; Matheron, Mike; McClure, Mike; Xiong, Zhongguo (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-08)
    • Diseases of Urban Plants in Arizona

      Olsen, Mary W.; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-04)
      Geographically, Arizona can be divided roughly into four areas, southwest, central, southeast, and northern. These regions correspond with four climatic zones, allowing a large and diverse number of plants to be grown for landscaping purposes. But, interestingly, in this desert environment many of the parasitic diseases in landscape plants are caused by a limited number of plant pathogens. This publication discusses some of those diseases that are sufficiently important to the urban plants in all areas Arizona.
    • Dwarf Mistletoes

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      Dwarf mistletoes are parasitic flowering plants that grow within host plants for about two years before producing characteristic yellow to orange or green to brown leafless aerial shoots on the outside of infected host tissue. They occur only on conifers in the pine family in Arizona and are usually host specific. This article gives information about the disease cycle, the symptoms and prevention and control methods for dwarf mistletoes.
    • Fire Blight

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      Fireblight is a bacterial disease that affects only plants in the rose family, particularly apple, pear and pyracantha. This article briefly discusses the symptoms and environmental conditions for this disease and the way to control it.
    • Guidelines for the Control of Coniophora eremophila on Lemon Trees for Southwestern Arizona

      Matheron, Michael E.; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1996-01)
      Coniophora eremophila is the only known indigenous species of Coniophora found in the Sonoran desert. There is a limited amount of information available regarding the true biology of this fungus and the decay it causes in relation to cultural practices. Recent studies show that of the citrus cultivars grown in Yuma County, lemon trees are the most susceptible to infection and that rootstock does not appear to influence the growth of Coniophora eremophila. This publication discusses the biological facts of Coniophora eremophila, discribes the symptoms of diseases caused by it, and discusses ways to control it.
    • Leaf Sampling Guide with Interpretation and Evaluation for Arizona Pecan Orchards

      Walworth, James; Pond, Andrew; Kilby, Michael W.; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-07)
      Leaf analysis is an excellent tool for determining the nutritional status of pecan trees.
    • Leaf Sampling Guide with Interpretation and Evaluation for Arizona Pecan Orchards

      Walworth, James L.; Pond, Andrew P.; Kilby, Michael W. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-10)
    • Powdery Mildew

      Olsen, Mary W.; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      Powdery mildew, a plant disease, appears as white, powdery spots on the leaf surface of several different kinds of plants. They are specific to their hosts and one type will infect only certain plants, usually those in the same or closely related plant families. This publication discusses the symptoms, environmental conditions, disease of powdery mildew and the methods used to prevent / control this plant disease.
    • Root-knot nematode

      Olsen, Mary W.; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      Nematodes are microscopic round worms found in many habitats. They are the most abundant multicellular organisms on earth. Most are beneficial memebers of their ecosystems, but a few are economic parasites of plants and animals. There are several plant parasitic nematodes that cause problems on landscape and garden plants in Arizona and the most widespread and economically important are the root-knot nematodes. This article discusses the hosts and environmental conditions, symptoms and disease of root-knot nematode, and the prevention / control method to it.
    • Salinity Management and Soil Amendments for Southwestern Pecan Orchards

      Walworth, J. L. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-10)
    • Salinity Management and Soil Amendments for Southwestern Pecan Orchards

      Walworth, James; Thompson, Thomas L.; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-07)
      Managing salts in Southwestern pecan orchards can be a major challenge for growers, due to limited soil permeability and/or low-quality irrigation water.
    • Seiridium Canker of Cypress Trees in Arizona

      Schalau, Jeff (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-01)
    • Sooty Canker

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      Sooty canker causes cankers and dieback in tree branches. This article briefly explains the host, symptoms, environmental conditions, disease and preventing / controlling method for sooty canker.
    • True Mistletoes

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      True mistletoes are parasitic flowering plants with characteristic clumps of growth that are easily visible on the host plant. They reduce the growth of infected hosts, but it usually takes many years for true mistletoe infections to kill a mature tree or shrub. This article gives information about the disease cycle, the symptoms and prevention and control methods for true mistletoes.
    • Using Gypsum in Southwestern Soils

      Walworth, James; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-07)
      Gypsum can help stabilize aggregate structure in some soils.