• Bacterial Heart-Rot of Celery

      Brown, J. G.; Boyle, Alice M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1951-02)
    • Beet Curly Top Disease (Curtoviruses) in Spinach and Table Beets in Arizona

      Nischwitz, Claudia; Olsen, Mary (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-10)
    • Biology and Management of Downy Mildew of Lettuce

      Matheron, Michael E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-09)
      This publication describes the factors affecting development of downy mildew of lettuce and provides disease management strategies.
    • Biology and management of Fusarium wilt of lettuce

      Matheron, Michael E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-08)
      This publication provides information on the development and management of Fusarium wilt of lettuce. Topics covered include the characteristics of the plant pathogen, disease development, and disease management considerations.
    • Comandra Blister Rust

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-05)
      Mondell pine should not be planted within a mile of Comandra populations. Infection of pine occurs through needles by spores produced on Comandra, but spores produced on pine cannot re-infect pine. This article gives information about the disease cycle, the symptoms and prevention and control methods for blister rust.
    • Control Lettuce Mosaic

      Shields, Ivan J.; Foster, Robert E.; Keener, Paul D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1958-03)
    • Control of Brown Wood Rot in Lemons with Low Pressure Injection 2012

      Wright, Glenn C.; Department of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona; Yuma Agriculture Center, Yuma, AZ (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-02)
      We injected AGRA PHOS (Potassium Phosphite) 0-2.4-2, Propaconizole – 0.05%, Propaconizole plus Azoxystrobin – 0.117 and 0.135% respectively, Zn, Mn and Fe 0.105, 0.112, and 0.10% respectively, and Azoxystrobin – 0.137% using a low pressure injection system for the control of Antrodia sinuosa in lemon trees. The Propaconizole + Azoxystrobin treatment, the Azoxystrobin treatment, and the Zn + Mn + Fe treatment led to significantly less fungal lesion growth when applied prior to the introduction of the fungus, as compared to their application after fungal introduction.
    • Control of Brown Wood Rot in Lemons with Low Pressure Injection 2013-14

      Wright, Glenn C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-09)
      We injected AGRA PHOS (Potassium Phosphite) 0-2.4-2, Propiconizole – 0.05%, Zn, Mn and Fe 0.105, 0.112, and 0.10% respectively, Zn, Mn and Fe 0.210, 0.220, and 0.200% respectively and Propiconizole – 0.05% + Zn, Mn and Fe 0.105, 0.112, and 0.10% respectively using a low pressure injection system for the control of Antrodia sinuosa in lemon trees. No treatment led to a significant reduction in fungal growth.
    • Cotton (Texas) Root Rot

      Olsen, Mary (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-02)
      The most important disease of woody dicotyledonous plants in Arizona is Phymatotrichopsis root rot (Cotton or Texas root rot) caused by a unique and widely distributed soil-borne fungus, Phymatotrichopsis omnivora. The fungus is indigenous to the alkaline, low-organic matter soils of the southwestern United States and central and northern Mexico.
    • Cotton (Texas) Root Rot

      Olsen, Mary W.; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-05)
      Cotton root rot commonly causes a sudden wilt and death of susceptible plants in summer months but may also cause a slow decline, especially at cooler temperatures. So, positive identification of disease by an experienced person is essential. This publication addresses the symptoms, environmental conditions, disease, prevention and control methods, sampling, identifying susceptible plants and the tolerant and immune plants of cotton root rot.
    • Cotton Seeds Can Carry Verticillium-Wilt Fungus

      Brown, J.G.; Allen, Ross M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1951-02)
    • Cultural Practices for Karnal Bunt Control

      Ottman, Michael J (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-05)
      Environmental conditions between awn emergence and the end of flowering is the overriding factor in disease development. 2 The University of Arizona Cooperative Extension Cultural practices may be partially effective in controlling Karnal bunt but cannot eliminate the disease completely. Karnal bunt is most likely to be found in areas where lodging or water ponding have occurred.
    • Damping Off

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      Damping off is caused by several different fungi under different environmental conditions. The fungi include Pythium, Rhizoctonia solani, and Thielaviopsis basicola. This article discusses the symptoms, environmental conditions, diseases, prevention and control methods for the damping-off caused by fungi.
    • Diseases of Citrus in Arizona

      Olsen, Mary W.; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-04)
      This publication discusses some diseases that are sufficiently important to the citrus in Arizona. Topics include: -Parasitic Diseases -fungi / virus diseases / virus or virus-like diseases -Mycoplasma Diseases -Nematode Diseases -Nonparasitic Diseases
    • Diseases of Citrus in Arizona

      Olsen, Mary; Matheron, Mike; McClure, Mike; Xiong, Zhongguo (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-08)
    • Diseases of Garden Crops

      Shields, Ivan J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1955-05)
    • Diseases of Urban Plants in Arizona

      Olsen, Mary W.; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-04)
      Geographically, Arizona can be divided roughly into four areas, southwest, central, southeast, and northern. These regions correspond with four climatic zones, allowing a large and diverse number of plants to be grown for landscaping purposes. But, interestingly, in this desert environment many of the parasitic diseases in landscape plants are caused by a limited number of plant pathogens. This publication discusses some of those diseases that are sufficiently important to the urban plants in all areas Arizona.
    • Dwarf Mistletoes

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      Dwarf mistletoes are parasitic flowering plants that grow within host plants for about two years before producing characteristic yellow to orange or green to brown leafless aerial shoots on the outside of infected host tissue. They occur only on conifers in the pine family in Arizona and are usually host specific. This article gives information about the disease cycle, the symptoms and prevention and control methods for dwarf mistletoes.
    • Fire Blight

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      Fireblight is a bacterial disease that affects only plants in the rose family, particularly apple, pear and pyracantha. This article briefly discusses the symptoms and environmental conditions for this disease and the way to control it.
    • Grain Sorghum Insects and Diseases

      Roney, J. N.; Shields, Ivan J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1955-03)