• Backyard Fruit Production at Elevations 3500 to 6000 Feet

      Young, Deborah; Call, Robert E; Kilby, Michael; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-03)
      The mid elevations (3,500 to 6,000 feet) in Arizona can be ideal for growing tree fruit. Site selection can make a pronounced effect on how well fruit will grow and produce. The warmer the site the greater the chance of success. Areas where cold air settles are a poor choice for tree fruit production. Variety selection is very important for good fruit production.February and March are the best months to plant bare root trees, although they can be planted anytime during the dormant season. Try to plant 30 days before bud break. Containerized plants are best planted in late September through early October. The open center pruning system allows for more sunlight to reach all the branches of the tree. Whereas the central leader is used with those trees that are less vigorous. Training trees when young is an important step in ensuring a strong scaffold system when bearing. Fruit thinning helps to control fruit size and consistent bearing. Proper fertilization, irrigation, and pest control will promote healthy productive trees.
    • Cultural Practices for Karnal Bunt Control

      Ottman, Michael; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-07)
      The weather near heading is the overriding factor in disease development. Cultural practices may be partially effective in controlling Karnal bunt, but cannot eliminate the disease completely.
    • Fertilizing Small Grains in Arizona

      Ottman, Michael; Thompson, Tom; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-03)
      Guidelines for nitrogen fertilization of small grains are presented using crop need, calendar dates, or tissue testing. Relationship between grain protein and nitrogen fertilization is presented. Phosphorus, potassium, and other nutrients are also discussed.
    • Growing Grain Sorghum in Arizona

      Ottman, Michael J; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-10)
      Production practices for grain sorghum are discussed including hybrid selection, planting date, seeding rate, row configuration, irrigation, fertilization, pest control, and harvesting. Grain sorghum (milo) is a warm season, annual grain crop. It is more resistant to salt, drought, and heat stress than most other crops. Nevertheless, highest yields are obtained when stresses are minimized. Revised 10/2016. Originally published 06/2009.
    • Growing Grain Sorghum in Arizona

      Ottman, Michael; Olsen, Mary; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-06)
      Production practices for grain sorghum are discussed including hybrid selection, planting date, seeding rate, row configuration, irrigation, fertilization, pest control, and harvesting.
    • Small Grain Growth and Development

      Ottman, Michael; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004-09)
      Growing degree days to reach various growth stages in small grains is presented in this publication, as well as the optimum timing of cultural practices relative to crop growth stage.