• 1960 Chemical Weed Control Recommendations for Irrigated Areas

      Unknown author (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1960-01)
    • 1961 Fertilizer Recommendations for Arizona Agronomic and Commercial Horticultural Crops

      Unknown author (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1960-12)
    • 2001-2002 Arizona Vegetable Crop Budgets: Central Arizona (Maricopa County)

      Teegerstrom, Trent; Umeda, Kai; Agricultural & Resource Economics (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001)
      This 2001-2002 Arizona Vegetable Crop Budget Book is comprised of tables estimating the operating and ownership costs of producing vegetable crops in Central Arizona. The costs are computed for a representative farm using representative cropping operations and are not a statistical sample of farms in the area.
    • 2001-2002 Arizona Vegetable Crop Budgets: Southern Arizona (Cochise, Pima and Pinal Counties)

      Teegerstrom, Trent; Call, Robert; Gibson, Rick; Agricultural & Resource Economics (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001)
      This 2001-2002 Arizona Vegetable Crop Budget Book is comprised of tables estimating the operating and ownership costs of producing vegetable crops in Central Arizona. The costs are computed for a representative farm using representative cropping operations and are not a statistical sample of farms in the area.
    • 2001-2002 Arizona Vegetable Crop Budgets: Western Arizona (Yuma and La Paz Counties)

      Teegerstrom, Trent; Palumbo, John; Zerkoune, Mohammed; Agricultural & Resource Economics (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001)
      This 2001-2002 Arizona Vegetable Crop Budget Book is comprised of tables estimating the operating and ownership costs of producing vegetable crops in Central Arizona. The costs are computed for a representative farm using representative cropping operations and are not a statistical sample of farms in the area.
    • 2011 Cotton Variety Testing Results

      Loper, Shawna; Masters, Linda; Mostafa, Ayman; Nolte, Kurt; Norton, Randy (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011)
    • 2012 Cotton Variety Testing Results

      Norton, Randy; Loper, Shawna; Masters, Linda; Mostafa, Ayman; Nolte, Kurt (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012)
    • 2016 Cotton Variety Testing Results – Report

      Norton, Randy; Ayman, Mostafa (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-02)
      Variety selection is one of the most important decisions a grower will make contributing to the success of a cotton crop. It is critical, that a grower have as much information as possible in order to make an informed decision regarding variety selection. In an effort to help supply reliable variety performance information, the University of Arizona conducts a statewide Upland cotton variety testing program. This program consists of a few different types of trials. The first is a small plot evaluation of commercially available varieties along with experimental varieties, and is conducted in 3 locations across Arizona including; Yuma, Maricopa, and Safford. This testing program is called the University of Arizona Upland Cotton Advanced Strains Testing Program.
    • Agricultural Use of Recycled Water for Crop Production in Arizona

      Cusimano, Jeremy; McLain, Jean E.; Eden, Susanna; Rock, Channah M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-06)
      Agriculture is by far the largest water-demanding sector in Arizona, accounting for 70% of water demand (ADWR, 2009). Arizona’s agriculture industry is extremely diversified, producing many crops that can legally be irrigated with recycled water, including cotton, alfalfa, wheat, citrus, and vegetables. Throughout the State, farming communities are taking advantage of increasing supplies of recycled water.
    • Alfalfa Aphid Complex

      Knowles, Tim C.; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-08)
      The alfalfa aphid discussed in this publication includes blue alfalfa aphid, pea aphid, and the spotted alfalfa aphid. This publication discusses the biology of these alfalfa aphids, the damages they cause, the resistant varieties and biological control, and their monitoring and treatments.
    • Alfalfa Caterpillar/Butterfly

      Knowles, Tim C.; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-08)
      The first sign of a potential alfalfa caterpillar (Colias eurytheme) outbreak is the influx of large numbers of yellow or white butterflies in late spring or early summer. This publication discusses the biology of the alfalfa caterpillar, the damage it causes, the biological and cultural controls, and the treatments for it.
    • Alfalfa for Forage Production in Arizona

      Dennis, R. E.; Hamilton, K. C.; Massengale, M. A.; Schonhorst, M. H.; Erie, L. J.; Halderman, A. D.; Amburgey, L. R.; Stanberry, C. O.; Tucker, T. C.; Nielson, M. W.; Tuttle, D. M.; Keener, P. D.; Shields, I. J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1961-08)
    • Alfalfa Weed Control in the Low Deserts of Arizona

      Ottman, Michael; Tickes, Barry; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-04)
      The most effective weed control practice in alfalfa is maintaining a healthy crop and dense stand. Cultural practices that promote a vigorous stand can reduce the need for chemical weed control. Cultural practices that promote a healthy stand reduce the need for chemical weed control, but herbicides are sometimes necessary even in well-managed alfalfa.
    • Ancient Rediscovering Food: Grain Amaranth

      Moya Cortazar, Sheila; Ottman, Michael; McDaniels, Amanda; Aragon Cereceres, Andrea; Hongu, Nobuko (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-04)
      Grain amaranth was a dietary staple for Central American Indians before Columbus arrived in the New World.1 Today, in Mexico, amaranth is popped like popcorn and mixed with sugar or honey to make a popular sweet treat, called “Alegría” which is the Spanish word for joy (Figure 1). Amaranth is a nutritious grain, similar to chia seeds2 and quinoa, providing high amount of plant protein, fiber, iron, and calcium. This article can help you learn more about amaranth, and show you how to incorporate them into your balanced diet.
    • Assessing Cotton Yield Loss to Hail Damage in Southern Arizona

      Wang, Guangyao (Sam) (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-08)
    • Backyard Fruit Production at Elevations 3500 to 6000 Feet

      Young, Deborah; Call, Robert E; Kilby, Michael; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-03)
      The mid elevations (3,500 to 6,000 feet) in Arizona can be ideal for growing tree fruit. Site selection can make a pronounced effect on how well fruit will grow and produce. The warmer the site the greater the chance of success. Areas where cold air settles are a poor choice for tree fruit production. Variety selection is very important for good fruit production.February and March are the best months to plant bare root trees, although they can be planted anytime during the dormant season. Try to plant 30 days before bud break. Containerized plants are best planted in late September through early October. The open center pruning system allows for more sunlight to reach all the branches of the tree. Whereas the central leader is used with those trees that are less vigorous. Training trees when young is an important step in ensuring a strong scaffold system when bearing. Fruit thinning helps to control fruit size and consistent bearing. Proper fertilization, irrigation, and pest control will promote healthy productive trees.
    • Barley in Arizona

      Day, A. D.; Dennis, R. E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1961-08)
    • Barley In Arizona

      Day, A. D.; Dennis, R. E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-01)
    • Basic Concepts of Nitrogen Phosphorus and Potassium in Calcareous Soils

      Fuller, Wallace H.; Ray, Howard E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-07)
    • Basic Concepts of Nitrogen Phosphorus and Potassium in Calcareous Soils

      Fuller, Wallace H.; Ray, Howard E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1967-11)