• Backyard Fruit Production at Elevations 3500 to 6000 Feet

      Young, Deborah; Call, Robert E; Kilby, Michael; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-03)
      The mid elevations (3,500 to 6,000 feet) in Arizona can be ideal for growing tree fruit. Site selection can make a pronounced effect on how well fruit will grow and produce. The warmer the site the greater the chance of success. Areas where cold air settles are a poor choice for tree fruit production. Variety selection is very important for good fruit production.February and March are the best months to plant bare root trees, although they can be planted anytime during the dormant season. Try to plant 30 days before bud break. Containerized plants are best planted in late September through early October. The open center pruning system allows for more sunlight to reach all the branches of the tree. Whereas the central leader is used with those trees that are less vigorous. Training trees when young is an important step in ensuring a strong scaffold system when bearing. Fruit thinning helps to control fruit size and consistent bearing. Proper fertilization, irrigation, and pest control will promote healthy productive trees.
    • Barley In Arizona

      Day, A. D.; Dennis, R. E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-01)
    • Barley in Arizona

      Day, A. D.; Dennis, R. E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1961-08)
    • Basic Concepts of Nitrogen Phosphorus and Potassium in Calcareous Soils

      Fuller, Wallace H.; Ray, Howard E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-07)
    • Basic Concepts of Nitrogen Phosphorus and Potassium in Calcareous Soils

      Fuller, Wallace H.; Ray, Howard E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1967-11)
    • Basics of Evaporation and Evapotranspiration

      Brown, Paul (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-01)
      Introduction: Local information on evapotranspiration (ET) is now readily available from on-site weather stations and/or public weather networks to assist turfgrass professionals with irrigation management decisions. Proper utilization of ET information can provide accurate estimates of daily water use and thus can assist irrigation managers with the all important decisions of when to apply water and how much water to apply. The concept of ET can be confusing and often is presented in a highly technical manner. The objective of this and subsequent bulletins in the Turf Irrigation Management Series is to simplify the subject of ET and thereby increase the effective utilization of ET in irrigation management. This bulletin provides some basic background on the related subjects of evaporation and evapotranspiration.
    • Basics of Evaporation and Evapotranspiration

      Brown, Paul; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-12)
      The objective of this and subsequent bulletins in the Turf Irrigation Management Series is to simplify the subject of ET and thereby increase the effective utilization of ET in irrigation management. This bulletin provides some basic background on the related subjects of evaporation and evapotranspiration.
    • Beet Armyworm

      Knowles, Tim C.; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-08)
      Beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua) caterpillars cause various damages to plants. This article describes the biology of the beet armyworm, discusses the damages they cause, and recommends the biological and cultural controls and treatments.
    • Better Coverage of Arizona's Weather and Climate: Gridded Datasets of Daily Surface Meteorological Variables

      Weiss, Jeremy; Crimmins, Michael; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-08)
      Many areas that use agricultural and environmental science for management and planning – ecosystem conservation, crop and livestock systems, water resources, forestry and wildland fire management, urban horticulture – often need historical records of daily weather for activities that range from modeling forage production to determining the frequency of freezing temperatures or heavy rainfall. In the past, such applications primarily have used station-based observations of meteorological variables like temperature and precipitation. However, weather stations are sparsely and irregularly located throughout Arizona, and due to the highly variable terrain across the state (Figure 1), information recorded at these sites may not represent meteorological conditions at distant, non-instrumented locations or over broad areas. This issue, along with others related to quality, length, and completeness of station records, can hinder the use of weather and climate data for agricultural and natural resources applications. In response to an increasing demand for spatially and temporally complete meteorological data as well as the potential constraints of station-based records, the number of gridded daily surface weather datasets is expanding. This bulletin reviews a current suite of these datasets, particularly those that integrate both atmospheric and topographic information in order to better model temperature and precipitation on relatively fine spatial scales, and is intended for readers with knowledge of weather, climate, and geospatial data. In addition to addressing how these datasets are developed and what their spatial domain and resolution, record length, and variables are, this bulletin also summarizes where and how to access these datasets, as well as the general suitability of these datasets for different uses.
    • Biology and management of Fusarium wilt of lettuce

      Matheron, Michael E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-08)
      This publication provides information on the development and management of Fusarium wilt of lettuce. Topics covered include the characteristics of the plant pathogen, disease development, and disease management considerations.
    • Budding Citrus Trees

      Wright, Glenn C.; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-02)
      Citrus budding is a plant propagation technique that any homeowner can do. Once the technique is learned, homeowners can add citrus tree. This publication addresses the budding techniques of citrus trees. Topics include the preparation prior to budding, selecting budsticks, storing budsticks, selecting and preparing the budding location, cutting the bud, inserting the bud in the t cut, and forcing the bud.
    • Can Yield of Late-planted Small Grains be Compensated by Water and Nitrogen Rates, 2016?

      Ottman, Michael J; Sheedy, Michael D; Ward, Richard W (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-11)
      Wheat and barley are often planted later than optimum due to the timing of the previous crop or to reduce the risk of frost damage. It may be possible to partially compensate for lower yield potential of late plantings by increasing water and nitrogen rates beyond what would have an effect at more optimal plantings. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of nitrogen and water rates on late planted wheat and barley. A trial testing water and nitrogen rates for small grains planted late and at the optimal time was established at the Maricopa Ag Center. The experimental design was a split-split plot with main plots as input levels of water and nitrogen (low, medium, and high), subplots as varieties (Tiburon durum and Chico barley), sub-subplots as planting dates (15 December 2015 and 1 February 2016, and 3 replications. In this study, higher levels on inputs of water and nitrogen did not increase yield at later planting dates as we hypothesized. In fact, the highest yields were obtained at medium inputs of water and nitrogen regardless of planting date. The yields of the later planting date were not depressed as we expected due to unusually mild temperatures later in the spring which favored a later planting date this season.
    • Chemical Control of Annual Weeds in Cotton

      Arle, H. Fred; Hamilton, K. C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1963-10)
    • Chemical Weed Control Recommendations for Irrigated Areas of Arizona

      College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-01
    • Chemical Weed Control Recommendations for Irrigated Areas of Arizona

      College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1968-01
    • Chemical Weed Control Recommendations for Irrigated Areas of Arizona

      College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1966-03
    • Chemical Weed Control Recommendations for Irrigated Areas of Arizona 1969

      College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1968-09
    • Chemical Weed Control Recommendations for Irrigated Areas of Arizona, 1961

      College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1960-11
    • Choosing Harvest Aid Chemicals for Arizona Cotton

      Wang, Guangyao (Sam); Norton, Randy; Loper, Shawna (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-01)
    • Clipping small grains to increase subsequent grain yield

      Ottman, Michael J; Sheedy, Michael D; Ward, Richard W (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-11)
      Wheat is commonly grown as a dual purpose crop especially in the Southern Great Plains where the forage is grazed then allowed to mature into a grain crop. In Arizona, clipping a crop planted in October may increase tillering and grain yield. A trial was conducted at the Maricopa Ag Center where various small grain varieties were planted on October 12, 2015, cut for forage on January 10, 2016, and allowed to go to grain and compared with the same varieties planted on December 3, 2016 and not cut for forage. No differences in grain yield due to planting date and clipping were detected. However, the October 12 planting with clipping had larger kernels, greater grain protein, and higher stem density. The income from the sale of the forage was $99/acre based a yield of 2639 lb/acre and a forage value of $75/ton. The added cost per acre to produce this forage included $29 for water (6.27 inches of water at $55/acre-ft) plus $34 for fertilizer (50 lb N/acre of urea at $433/ton). Therefore, even though grain yield was not increased by planting early and clipping, a net increase in revenue of $36/acre was realized from the sale of the forage.