• Can Yield of Late-planted Small Grains be Compensated by Water and Nitrogen Rates, 2016?

      Ottman, Michael J; Sheedy, Michael D; Ward, Richard W (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-11)
      Wheat and barley are often planted later than optimum due to the timing of the previous crop or to reduce the risk of frost damage. It may be possible to partially compensate for lower yield potential of late plantings by increasing water and nitrogen rates beyond what would have an effect at more optimal plantings. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of nitrogen and water rates on late planted wheat and barley. A trial testing water and nitrogen rates for small grains planted late and at the optimal time was established at the Maricopa Ag Center. The experimental design was a split-split plot with main plots as input levels of water and nitrogen (low, medium, and high), subplots as varieties (Tiburon durum and Chico barley), sub-subplots as planting dates (15 December 2015 and 1 February 2016, and 3 replications. In this study, higher levels on inputs of water and nitrogen did not increase yield at later planting dates as we hypothesized. In fact, the highest yields were obtained at medium inputs of water and nitrogen regardless of planting date. The yields of the later planting date were not depressed as we expected due to unusually mild temperatures later in the spring which favored a later planting date this season.
    • Chemical Control of Annual Weeds in Cotton

      Arle, H. Fred; Hamilton, K. C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1963-10)
    • Chemical Weed Control Recommendations for Irrigated Areas of Arizona

      College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-01
    • Chemical Weed Control Recommendations for Irrigated Areas of Arizona

      College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1968-01
    • Chemical Weed Control Recommendations for Irrigated Areas of Arizona

      College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1966-03
    • Chemical Weed Control Recommendations for Irrigated Areas of Arizona 1969

      College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1968-09
    • Chemical Weed Control Recommendations for Irrigated Areas of Arizona, 1961

      College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1960-11
    • Choosing Harvest Aid Chemicals for Arizona Cotton

      Wang, Guangyao (Sam); Norton, Randy; Loper, Shawna (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-01)
    • Clipping small grains to increase subsequent grain yield

      Ottman, Michael J; Sheedy, Michael D; Ward, Richard W (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-11)
      Wheat is commonly grown as a dual purpose crop especially in the Southern Great Plains where the forage is grazed then allowed to mature into a grain crop. In Arizona, clipping a crop planted in October may increase tillering and grain yield. A trial was conducted at the Maricopa Ag Center where various small grain varieties were planted on October 12, 2015, cut for forage on January 10, 2016, and allowed to go to grain and compared with the same varieties planted on December 3, 2016 and not cut for forage. No differences in grain yield due to planting date and clipping were detected. However, the October 12 planting with clipping had larger kernels, greater grain protein, and higher stem density. The income from the sale of the forage was $99/acre based a yield of 2639 lb/acre and a forage value of $75/ton. The added cost per acre to produce this forage included $29 for water (6.27 inches of water at $55/acre-ft) plus $34 for fertilizer (50 lb N/acre of urea at $433/ton). Therefore, even though grain yield was not increased by planting early and clipping, a net increase in revenue of $36/acre was realized from the sale of the forage.
    • The Colorado River Indian Tribes (C.R.I.T.) Reservation and Extension Programs

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Masters, Linda; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet describes the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the CRIT reservation, as well as the history of extension and effective extension programs and collaborations conducted on this reservation.
    • The Colorado River Indian Tribes (C.R.I.T.) Reservation Quick Facts

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Masters, Linda; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet briefly describes the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the Colorado River Indian Tribes reservation.
    • Commercially Available Cotton Height-Controlling PGRs in Arizona

      Wang, Guangyao (Sam); Norton, Randy (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-01)
    • Common Insect Contaminants Found in Arizona Lettuce

      Kerns, David L.; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-02)
      This publication describes the common insects found in Arizona lettuce through the use of pictures. The insects include; lepidopterous larva, striped flea beetle, leafminer fly, leafminer mine, adult western flower thrips, winged adult aphid, false chinch bug, lygus bug, potato leafhopper, and threecornered alfalfa hopper.
    • Como Medir el Flujo de Agua en los Canales de Riego a Cielo Abierto y en las Tuberias de Computeras (Spanish)

      Martin, Edward; Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-12)
      Measuring water is a critical part of any irrigation management system. This informational bulletin gives some simplistic methods of measuring flow rate in an open ditch and in gated pipe. Using the float method, dye tracers and velocity head meters, growers can get a quick estimate of the flow in their farm ditch. From this, an estimate of water applied or a set time can be determined. The bulletin also explains how a propeller meter works for gated pipe. Gated pipe is widely used through the state and in the West.
    • Compost Tea 101: What Every Organic Gardener Should Know

      Joe, Valerisa; Rock, Channah; McLain, Jean; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-08)
      Growers of organic produce in the Southwestern United States face many challenges, including variation in water and temperature, and exposure to insects and disease. As a result, smallholder organic farmers are increasingly relying on soil additives such as compost tea that improve product quality, use less water, deter pests, and reduce reliance on chemical additives (Diver, 2002). But what exactly is compost tea? Do the benefits of using compost tea outweigh any concerns? For example, can it contain pathogens, and if so, do applicators have to worry about coming into contact with pathogens? This publication provides facts about making compost tea, and reviews both the benefits and potential disadvantages to help smallholder farmers to make educated decisions regarding the use of compost tea.
    • Conducting Research Projects on the San Carlos Apache Reservation, Arizona

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet briefly describes the research protocol of the San Carlos Apache Tribe reservation.
    • Confirm and Success: New Tools for Insect Management in Cole Crops and Leafy Green Vegetables in Arizona

      Kerns, David L.; Palumbo, John C.; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1997-12)
    • Control of Brown Wood Rot in Lemons with Low Pressure Injection 2012

      Wright, Glenn C.; Department of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona; Yuma Agriculture Center, Yuma, AZ (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-02)
      We injected AGRA PHOS (Potassium Phosphite) 0-2.4-2, Propaconizole – 0.05%, Propaconizole plus Azoxystrobin – 0.117 and 0.135% respectively, Zn, Mn and Fe 0.105, 0.112, and 0.10% respectively, and Azoxystrobin – 0.137% using a low pressure injection system for the control of Antrodia sinuosa in lemon trees. The Propaconizole + Azoxystrobin treatment, the Azoxystrobin treatment, and the Zn + Mn + Fe treatment led to significantly less fungal lesion growth when applied prior to the introduction of the fungus, as compared to their application after fungal introduction.
    • Control of Brown Wood Rot in Lemons with Low Pressure Injection 2013-14

      Wright, Glenn C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-09)
      We injected AGRA PHOS (Potassium Phosphite) 0-2.4-2, Propiconizole – 0.05%, Zn, Mn and Fe 0.105, 0.112, and 0.10% respectively, Zn, Mn and Fe 0.210, 0.220, and 0.200% respectively and Propiconizole – 0.05% + Zn, Mn and Fe 0.105, 0.112, and 0.10% respectively using a low pressure injection system for the control of Antrodia sinuosa in lemon trees. No treatment led to a significant reduction in fungal growth.
    • Control of Phymatotrichum (Cotton or Texas) Root Rot in Arizona

      Streets, R. B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1938-04-15)