• Damping Off

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      Damping off is caused by several different fungi under different environmental conditions. The fungi include Pythium, Rhizoctonia solani, and Thielaviopsis basicola. This article discusses the symptoms, environmental conditions, diseases, prevention and control methods for the damping-off caused by fungi.
    • Date Production in Arizona

      Powers, H. B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1945-05)
    • Dates in Arizona

      Tate, Harvey F.; Hilgeman, Robert H. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1962-04)
    • Defoliating Cotton in Arizona

      Brown, Lamar C.; Ellwood, Charles C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1952-08)
    • Defoliating Cotton in Arizona, 1953

      Brown, Lamar C.; Ellwood, Charles C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1953-05)
    • Defoliating Cotton in Arizona, 1954

      Brown, Lamar C.; Ellwood, Charles C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1954-07)
    • Defoliation Timing for Arizona Cotton

      Norton, Randy; Wang, Guangyao (Sam); Loper, Shawna (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-03)
    • Determining the Mainstem Node Number for Cotton

      Silvertooth, Jeffrey C.; Brown, Paul W. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-06)
      To systematically monitor a young crop effectively, it is important to understand the fundamentals about counting and identifying nodes on the plant. A mainstem node is simply the point on the plant stalk where a joint with a side branch (either vegetative or fruiting branch) is formed. The basic point of reference for counting nodes on a cotton plant are the cotyledonary nodes. The cotylendonary leaves are the first two leaves to appear as the plant emerges through the soil after planting, and are actually the former halves of the seed itself. Therefore, the cotyledons form the first nodes on the mainstem of the plant and they are the only nodes which are directly opposite one another, or parallel. When counting mainstem nodes we use the cotyledon nodes as 0, then counting subsequent nodes up the mainstem toward the terminal of the plant.
    • Diagnosing Home Citrus Problems

      Wright, Glenn C.; Begeman, John; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-04)
      Diagnosing Home Citrus Problems includes information on all the commonly encountered dooryard citrus problems encountered in Arizona. Problems/disorders are grouped into three catagories: problems with fruit, problems with leaves, and problems with stems, branches and entire tree. Symptoms, causes and control measures are given for each disorder.
    • Diagnosing Nutrient Deficiencies Quick-Reference

      Loper, Shawna; Area Extension Agent, Agriculture (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-02)
    • Diseases of Citrus in Arizona

      Olsen, Mary W.; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-04)
      This publication discusses some diseases that are sufficiently important to the citrus in Arizona. Topics include: -Parasitic Diseases -fungi / virus diseases / virus or virus-like diseases -Mycoplasma Diseases -Nematode Diseases -Nonparasitic Diseases
    • Diseases of Urban Plants in Arizona

      Olsen, Mary W.; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-04)
      Geographically, Arizona can be divided roughly into four areas, southwest, central, southeast, and northern. These regions correspond with four climatic zones, allowing a large and diverse number of plants to be grown for landscaping purposes. But, interestingly, in this desert environment many of the parasitic diseases in landscape plants are caused by a limited number of plant pathogens. This publication discusses some of those diseases that are sufficiently important to the urban plants in all areas Arizona.
    • Early Cotton Development

      Silvertooth, J.C.; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-02)
    • Early Cotton Development

      Silvertooth, Jeffrey C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-06)
      After stand establishment, the next critical stage in the development of a cotton crop is the initiation of the first squares, or floral buds, which could develop into the plants’ first boll. This is an important step for a cotton crop and one which is usually followed closely by the attentive farmer.
    • Early Season Crop Management

      Silvertooth, Jeffrey C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-06)
      The approaches and techniques used to produce a cotton crop in Arizona can vary to some degree from county to county, or from farm to farm. However, one of the objectives that has become increasingly common across Arizona is that of achieving earliness with a crop.
    • Economic Trends in the Lettuce Industry

      Foote, J. M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1932-08)
    • Effect of Amount of Irrigation Water Applied on Forage Sorghum Yield and Quality at Maricopa, AZ, 2015

      Ottman, Michael J; Diaz, Duarte E; Sheedy, Michael D; Ward, Richard W (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-02)
      Irrigation water is a major input into production of a forage crop. The purpose of this research is to compare the yield and quality of forage sorghum grown with differing amounts of irrigation water. A linear move sprinkler system was used to apply 11 water application amounts from 23.79 to 35.52 inches over the season. Forage yield peaked at a water application amount of around 32.60 inches according to a quadratic function of yield vs water applied. Increasing irrigation amount decreased forage quality by increasing fiber components. Profit was maximized at 30.20 to 32.60 inches of applied water, which is slightly less than that for maximum yield.
    • Egyptian Alfalfa Weevil

      Knowles, Tim C.; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-08)
      Adult Egyptian alfalfa weevils (Hypera brunneipennis) are light brown with dark brown and grey markings down their backs and are about 0.2 inches long. This article discusses the biology of Egyptian alfalfa weevil, the damage it causes, the biological and cultural control method, how to monitor it and when to treat the damage.
    • Estimating the Vegetative/Reproductive Balance in Cotton Growth

      Silvertooth, Jeffrey C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-06)
    • Evaluation of ADWR Water Duties for Large Turf Facilities

      Brown, Paul; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-06)
      This publication summarizes the results of a three year research study that evaluated whether the turf water duties mandated by the Arizona Department of Water Resources provide adequate water to grow acceptable quality turf in the Tucson and Phoenix areas.