• Making Sorghum Sirup

      Ballantyne, A. B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1917-11)
    • Management of Fertilizer Nitrogen in Arizona Cotton Production

      Silvertooth, J.C.; Norton, E. Randall; Ayala, Felix; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      Nitrogen (N) is the nutrient that is required most consistently and in larger amounts than other nutrients for cotton production. Common rates of fertilizer N applied in Arizona cotton production systems range from 50 to over 300 lbs N/acre. The management of fertilizer N is critical, both for insuring optimum cotton yields, and minimizing the potential for environmental contamination.
    • Measuring Water Flow and Rate on the Farm

      Martin, Edward C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-10)
      Proper water management involves two basic considerations: when and how much irrigation water to apply. The timing of an irrigation event (the when) involves utilizing information on plant needs and soil water conditions. How much depends primarily on the soil’s water holding capacity, the depletion level and the rooting depth of the crop. Once you have calculated how much water to apply, how can you be sure that you have accurately applied that amount? Or, if you miss your target amount, how do you determine how much water you actually applied? The amount of water applied to a field is a function of time, flow and area. The time of an irrigation is easily recorded. The amount of area irrigated is also easily calculated. However, estimating flow rate in an open ditch is often guess work, at best. In this bulletin we shall discuss ways to measure water flow in an open ditch.
    • Measuring Water Flow and Rate on the Farm

      Martin, Edward; Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-01)
      Proper water management involves two basic considerations: when and how much irrigation water to apply. The amount of water applied to a field is a function of time, flow, and area. The time of an irrigation is easily recorded. The amount of area irrigated is also easily calculated. Estimating flow rate in an open ditch is often guess work, at best. This publication discusses ways to measure water flow in an open ditch.
    • Measuring Water Flow in Surface Irrigation Ditches and Gated Pipe

      Martin, Edward; Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-08)
      Measuring water is a critical part of any irrigation management system. This informational bulletin gives some simplistic methods of measuring flow rate in an open ditch and in gated pipe. Using the float method, dye tracers and velocity head meters, growers can get a quick estimate of the flow in their farm ditch. From this, an estimate of water applied or a set time can be determined. The bulletin also explains how a propeller meter works for gated pipe. Gated pipe is widely used through the state and in the West.
    • Melon Insect Pest Management in Arizona

      Palumbo, John C.; Kerns, David; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-06)
      Melon production in the Southwestern United States occurs primarily in the desert growing areas of Arizona, and Southern California. Melons in Arizona are grown in very diverse cropping systems, where a variety of vegetable, agronomic and seed crops are cultivated concurrently throughout the year. Numerous insect species can be found on melon plants, but only a few have been determined to be economically important. This publication discusses several key insects that cause economic damage to melons, and the tactics commonly used to manage infesting populations.
    • Methods of Measuring for Irrigation Scheduling - WHEN

      Martin, Edward C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-10)
      Proper irrigation management requires that growers assess their irrigation needs by taking measurements of various physical parameters. Some use sophisticated equipment while others use tried and true common sense approaches. Whichever method used, each has merits and limitations. In developing any irrigation management strategy, two questions are common: “When do I irrigate?” and “How much do I apply?” This bulletin deals with the WHEN.
    • Metodos para Medir la Humedad del Suelo para la Programacion del Riego--¿Cuando? (Spanish)

      Martin, Edward; Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-09)
    • Métodos para Medir la Humedad del Suelo para la Programación del Riego ¿Cuándo?

      Martin, Edward C.; Munoz, Carolina (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-02)
      El manejo apropiado del riego requiere la evaluación de parte del agricultor de sus necesidades de riego en base a medidas de varios parámetros físicos del suelo. Algunos productores utilizan equipo sofisticado mientras que otros se basan en métodos empíricos o en el sentido común. Cualquiera que sea el método usado, cada uno tiene sus propios méritos y limitaciones. El agricultor generalmente se hace dos preguntas al desarrollar una estrategia para el manejo del riego: “¿Cuándo regar?” y “¿Cuánta agua aplicar?”. Este boletín responde a la pregunta CUÁNDO. Reviewed 2/2017; Originally Published 09/2010.
    • Minimum tillage for wheat following winter vegetables

      Nolte, Kurt; Ottman, Mike; Teegerstrom, Trent; Wang, Guangyao (Sam); Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-08)
      In 2009, over 56,000 acres were planted to wheat in Arizona, all of which following either a lettuce or cotton crop. For wheat grown in the region, the conventional tillage sequence prior to planting can be tied to as many as seven field operations that consume valuable time, labor, and resources. In this study, our aim was to determine the effectiveness of reducing the number tillage (minimum till) operations in fields immediately following lettuce harvest. And demonstrate to Southwest wheat producers a means for conserving time, fuel, and resources. Growing wheat on lettuce beds immediately following lettuce harvest did not significantly reduce grain yield or quality. Although the regrowth of the previous crop can have significant implications for Durum grown with minimum tillage if not managed effectively, lodging was not a significant factor in this study as the degree of lodging was similar in both growing systems. The significant savings in fuel, labor and time, with no apparent reduction in Durum yield or quality, may be a significant benefit to wheat producers who incorporate minimum tillage practices following a lettuce crop.
    • Minimum Tillage in the Southwest

      Harris, Karl; Erie, Leonard J.; Fuller, Wallace H. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-02)
    • Mowing Turfgrasses in the Desert

      Kopec, David; Umeda, Kai (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-09)
      Describes how to select the appropriate lawn mower to properly mow the species of grass at the correct height for high, medium, or low maintenance levels.
    • The Navajo Nation and Extension Programs

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Moore, Gerald; Benally, Jeannie; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet describes describes the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the Navajo reservation, as well as the history of extension and effective extension programs and collaborations conducted on this reservation.
    • The Navajo Nation Quick Facts

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Moore, Gerald; Benally, Jeannie; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet briefly describes the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the Navajo reservation.
    • Nitrogen Fertilizer Rate Effect on Forage Sorghum Yield, Quality, and Tissue Nitrogen Concentrations at Maricopa, AZ, 2015

      Ottman, Michael J; Diaz, Duarte E; Sheedy, Michael D; Ward, Richard W (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-02)
      A nitrogen fertilizer study was conducted in order to determine the effect of N rates on forage sorghum yield and quality and to develop tissue testing guidelines for fertilizer application to forage sorghum. The study was conducted at the University of Arizona Maricopa Agricultural center on sandy clay loam soil irrigated using the flood method. Forage sorghum was fertilized with six N rates varying from 0 to 250 lb N/acre in 50 lb N/acre increments. The whole plant, lower stem, and most recently expanded leaf were sampled five times during the growing season and analyzed for N content in order to establish tissue N guidelines for fertilizer application. The plant part that was most sensitive to N fertilizer application and plant N status was lower stem. Leaf and plant N levels were not affected by fertilizer application. The stem nitrate and stem N tests were able to identify N deficient plants very early in the season, long before plant growth was affected by the N deficiency, unlike leaf and plant N. Forage yield at final harvest fitted to a quadratic function was maximized at the 250 lb N/acre N rate. However, the yield increase with any amount of fertilizer did not pay for the cost of the fertilizer and the most economical N rate for yield was no N fertilizer applied at all. In terms of milk per acre, the maximum was achieved at 150 lb N/acre, and the economic optimum in terms of milk was slightly less than this amount of fertilizer.
    • Nondormant Alfalfa Varieties for Arizona 2008

      Ottman, Michael; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-09)
      Nondormant alfalfa varieties are adapted to mild winter areas in Arizona. An alfalfa variety should be selected based on dormancy class, potential pest problems, university yield trials, and on-farm tests. This publication contains pest resistance ratings and a summary of University of Arizona yield trials for nondormant alfalfa varieties.
    • Nondormant Alfalfa Varieties for Arizona 2012

      Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-12)
    • Nondormant Alfalfa Varieties for Arizona 2013

      Ottman, Michael J.; Plant Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-09)
    • Nondormant Alfalfa Varieties for Arizona 2015

      Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-09)
      Alfalfa varieties differ in fall dormancy, defined as growth during the fall. Nondormant alfalfa varieties are usually planted in mild winter areas for their ability to grow in the late fall, winter, and early spring. Select alfalfa varieties that have resistance to potential pest problems. Alfalfa varieties are available that have salt tolerance or are Roundup Ready. Ratings are provided in this publication. Many of the varieties listed in this publication have been tested for yield and final stand by the University of Arizona in small plot trials.
    • Nondormant alfalfa varieties for Arizona 2016

      Ottman, Michael J; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-10)
      Alfalfa varieties differ in fall dormancy, defined as growth during the fall. Nondormant alfalfa varieties are usually planted in mild winter areas for their ability to grow in the late fall, winter, and early spring. Select alfalfa varieties that have resistance to potential pest problems. Alfalfa varieties are available that have salt tolerance or are Roundup Ready. Ratings are provided in this publication. Many of the varieties listed in this publication have been tested for yield and final stand by the University of Arizona in small plot trials. Revised 10/2016. Most recent version 09/2015