• The Navajo Nation and Extension Programs

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Moore, Gerald; Benally, Jeannie; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet describes describes the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the Navajo reservation, as well as the history of extension and effective extension programs and collaborations conducted on this reservation.
    • The Navajo Nation Quick Facts

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Moore, Gerald; Benally, Jeannie; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet briefly describes the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the Navajo reservation.
    • Nitrogen Fertilizer Rate Effect on Forage Sorghum Yield, Quality, and Tissue Nitrogen Concentrations at Maricopa, AZ, 2015

      Ottman, Michael J; Diaz, Duarte E; Sheedy, Michael D; Ward, Richard W (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-02)
      A nitrogen fertilizer study was conducted in order to determine the effect of N rates on forage sorghum yield and quality and to develop tissue testing guidelines for fertilizer application to forage sorghum. The study was conducted at the University of Arizona Maricopa Agricultural center on sandy clay loam soil irrigated using the flood method. Forage sorghum was fertilized with six N rates varying from 0 to 250 lb N/acre in 50 lb N/acre increments. The whole plant, lower stem, and most recently expanded leaf were sampled five times during the growing season and analyzed for N content in order to establish tissue N guidelines for fertilizer application. The plant part that was most sensitive to N fertilizer application and plant N status was lower stem. Leaf and plant N levels were not affected by fertilizer application. The stem nitrate and stem N tests were able to identify N deficient plants very early in the season, long before plant growth was affected by the N deficiency, unlike leaf and plant N. Forage yield at final harvest fitted to a quadratic function was maximized at the 250 lb N/acre N rate. However, the yield increase with any amount of fertilizer did not pay for the cost of the fertilizer and the most economical N rate for yield was no N fertilizer applied at all. In terms of milk per acre, the maximum was achieved at 150 lb N/acre, and the economic optimum in terms of milk was slightly less than this amount of fertilizer.
    • Nondormant Alfalfa Varieties for Arizona 2008

      Ottman, Michael; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-09)
      Nondormant alfalfa varieties are adapted to mild winter areas in Arizona. An alfalfa variety should be selected based on dormancy class, potential pest problems, university yield trials, and on-farm tests. This publication contains pest resistance ratings and a summary of University of Arizona yield trials for nondormant alfalfa varieties.
    • Nondormant Alfalfa Varieties for Arizona 2012

      Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-12)
    • Nondormant Alfalfa Varieties for Arizona 2013

      Ottman, Michael J.; Plant Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-09)
    • Nondormant Alfalfa Varieties for Arizona 2015

      Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-09)
      Alfalfa varieties differ in fall dormancy, defined as growth during the fall. Nondormant alfalfa varieties are usually planted in mild winter areas for their ability to grow in the late fall, winter, and early spring. Select alfalfa varieties that have resistance to potential pest problems. Alfalfa varieties are available that have salt tolerance or are Roundup Ready. Ratings are provided in this publication. Many of the varieties listed in this publication have been tested for yield and final stand by the University of Arizona in small plot trials.
    • Nondormant alfalfa varieties for Arizona 2016

      Ottman, Michael J; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-10)
      Alfalfa varieties differ in fall dormancy, defined as growth during the fall. Nondormant alfalfa varieties are usually planted in mild winter areas for their ability to grow in the late fall, winter, and early spring. Select alfalfa varieties that have resistance to potential pest problems. Alfalfa varieties are available that have salt tolerance or are Roundup Ready. Ratings are provided in this publication. Many of the varieties listed in this publication have been tested for yield and final stand by the University of Arizona in small plot trials. Revised 10/2016. Most recent version 09/2015
    • Operation of Yield Monitors in Central Arizona: Grains and Cotton

      Andrade-Sanchez, Pedro; Heun, John T. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-06)
    • Overseeding Winter Grasses into Bermudagrass Turf

      Kopec, David; Umeda, Kai (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-10)
      Describes the proper timing of overseeding, selecting winter grasses, and procedures to prepare for overseeding with the amount of seed to use followed by irrigating, fertilizing, and mowing.
    • Phosphorus Fertilizer Rate Effect on Alfalfa Yield and Soil Test P, Buckeye, 2014

      Ottman, Mike; Rovey, Jason; Mostafa, Ayman; Burayu, Worku; University of Arizona, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences; Rovey Farming Company; Maricopa County Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-06)
      Phosphorus is the primary fertilizer nutrient needed by alfalfa in Arizona. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of P fertilizer rate on alfalfa yield and soil test P. A phosphorus fertilizer rate study was conducted with alfalfa in Buckeye, AZ where 11-52-0 was applied at 0, 200, 400, and 800 lb fertilizer/acre in February, 2014 after the first cutting. Alfalfa hay yield was increased by phosphorus fertilizer application up to the cutting on July 30, but not thereafter. No differences in yield were found among the fertilizer rates of 200,400, and 800 lb 11-52-0/acre. Soil test phosphorus increased directly proportional to fertilizer rate, but eventually decreased close to deficient levels 3-5 months after fertilizer application. It is not known if additional fertilizer applications throughout the season would increase yield. Fertilizer rates higher than 200 lb 11-52-0/acre were not beneficial under the conditions of this study.
    • Physiology of Cotton Defoliation

      Ayala, Felix; Silvertooth, Jeffrey C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-06)
      This bulletin deals with the physiology of cotton defoliation and attempts to describe what conditions must exist inside the plant in order for defoliation to occur. It is important to understand the basic physiological processes involved in order for best crop management practices to accomplish a successful defoliation. The objectives of defoliating a cotton crop can be simply stated as: 1) to remove leaves to facilitate mechanical picking, 2) to maintain the quality of the lint, and 3) to complete defoliation with a single application of chemicals.
    • Pick Quality Cotton: A Manual on Mechanical Cotton Pickers

      College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1956-08
    • Planting Cotton to a Stand

      Larsen, W. E.; Cannon, M. D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1966-01)
    • Planting Dates for Small Grains in Arizona

      Ottman, Michael J (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-05)
      Planting at the optimum time is probably the most important cultural practice in producing high small grain yields. Wheat and barley crops that are planted too early or too late have lower yield potential no matter how they are grown after planting. However, small grains are sometimes planted later than optimum when grown in rotation with cotton or vegetables due to harvest timing in these crops. Therefore, the entire farm enterprise should be considered when deciding on a planting date for small grains.
    • Planting Dates for Small Grains in Arizona

      Ottman, Michael; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004-03)
      The optimum planting by elevation is presented for small grains in Arizona. The influence of planting date on crop development, grain yield and frost risk is discussed.
    • Planting methods for small grains in Arizona

      Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-05)
      Small grains are planted for a variety of reasons, but their rotational benefit makes them a popular crop all over the world and influences the way they are planted. One of the major benefits of small grains as rotational crops is that they cover the soil and suppress weeds. Thus, small grains are most commonly solid seeded with a grain drill.
    • Planting Methods for Small Grains in Arizona

      Ottman, Michael; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004-03)
      Self seeding, planting equipment, planting into stubble, row spacing, bed vs flat planting, planting into moisture vs. irrigation up, and planting direction are discussed.
    • Planting No-Till Cotton after Small Grains

      Wang, Guangyao (Sam); Rayner, Ron; Norton, Randy; Mostafa, Ayman; Loper, Shawna (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-02)
    • Potato Growing in Northern Arizona

      Kinnison, A. F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1924-07)