• Operation of Yield Monitors in Central Arizona: Grains and Cotton

      Andrade-Sanchez, Pedro; Heun, John T. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-06)
    • Overseeding Winter Grasses into Bermudagrass Turf

      Kopec, David; Umeda, Kai (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-10)
      Describes the proper timing of overseeding, selecting winter grasses, and procedures to prepare for overseeding with the amount of seed to use followed by irrigating, fertilizing, and mowing.
    • Phosphorus Fertilizer Rate Effect on Alfalfa Yield and Soil Test P, Buckeye, 2014

      Ottman, Mike; Rovey, Jason; Mostafa, Ayman; Burayu, Worku; University of Arizona, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences; Rovey Farming Company; Maricopa County Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-06)
      Phosphorus is the primary fertilizer nutrient needed by alfalfa in Arizona. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of P fertilizer rate on alfalfa yield and soil test P. A phosphorus fertilizer rate study was conducted with alfalfa in Buckeye, AZ where 11-52-0 was applied at 0, 200, 400, and 800 lb fertilizer/acre in February, 2014 after the first cutting. Alfalfa hay yield was increased by phosphorus fertilizer application up to the cutting on July 30, but not thereafter. No differences in yield were found among the fertilizer rates of 200,400, and 800 lb 11-52-0/acre. Soil test phosphorus increased directly proportional to fertilizer rate, but eventually decreased close to deficient levels 3-5 months after fertilizer application. It is not known if additional fertilizer applications throughout the season would increase yield. Fertilizer rates higher than 200 lb 11-52-0/acre were not beneficial under the conditions of this study.
    • Physiology of Cotton Defoliation

      Ayala, Felix; Silvertooth, Jeffrey C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-06)
      This bulletin deals with the physiology of cotton defoliation and attempts to describe what conditions must exist inside the plant in order for defoliation to occur. It is important to understand the basic physiological processes involved in order for best crop management practices to accomplish a successful defoliation. The objectives of defoliating a cotton crop can be simply stated as: 1) to remove leaves to facilitate mechanical picking, 2) to maintain the quality of the lint, and 3) to complete defoliation with a single application of chemicals.
    • Pick Quality Cotton: A Manual on Mechanical Cotton Pickers

      Unknown author (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1956-08)
    • Planting Cotton to a Stand

      Larsen, W. E.; Cannon, M. D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1966-01)
    • Planting Dates for Small Grains in Arizona

      Ottman, Michael; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004-03)
      The optimum planting by elevation is presented for small grains in Arizona. The influence of planting date on crop development, grain yield and frost risk is discussed.
    • Planting Dates for Small Grains in Arizona

      Ottman, Michael J (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-05)
      Planting at the optimum time is probably the most important cultural practice in producing high small grain yields. Wheat and barley crops that are planted too early or too late have lower yield potential no matter how they are grown after planting. However, small grains are sometimes planted later than optimum when grown in rotation with cotton or vegetables due to harvest timing in these crops. Therefore, the entire farm enterprise should be considered when deciding on a planting date for small grains.
    • Planting Methods for Small Grains in Arizona

      Ottman, Michael; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004-03)
      Self seeding, planting equipment, planting into stubble, row spacing, bed vs flat planting, planting into moisture vs. irrigation up, and planting direction are discussed.
    • Planting methods for small grains in Arizona

      Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-05)
      Small grains are planted for a variety of reasons, but their rotational benefit makes them a popular crop all over the world and influences the way they are planted. One of the major benefits of small grains as rotational crops is that they cover the soil and suppress weeds. Thus, small grains are most commonly solid seeded with a grain drill.
    • Planting No-Till Cotton after Small Grains

      Wang, Guangyao (Sam); Rayner, Ron; Norton, Randy; Mostafa, Ayman; Loper, Shawna (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-02)
    • Potato Growing in Northern Arizona

      Kinnison, A. F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1924-07)
    • Potential Yield Increase by Grafting for Watermelon Production in Arizona

      Kroggel, Mark; Kubota, Chieri (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-01)
      Grafting cucurbits onto rootstocks resistant to diseases and abiotic stresses can be a methodto overcome limited availability of effective pre-plant fumigants or land to rotate and to allowearlier planting. Commonly used rootstocks for cucurbits have resistance to Fusarium (race1&2) as well as cold tolerance, among other favorable traits like increased vigor of the scion. Grafting of cucurbits was developed in Asia primarily to allow production without rotation, because arable land is so limited. In the US, crop rotation schedules for seedless watermelon can be 3 years or longer reducing the amount of watermelon a grower can produce in a season. We have been growing grafted and non-grafted seedless watermelon on the same field/plot for 4 years, with no fumigation or off-season rotation of other crops. During the last 2 years, we planted early (March 1) to determine if grafting could overcome low night temperatures in addition to disease pressures. Treatments included grafted and non-grafted plants, covering with frost protection and non-covered. The results of the last 2 years indicate that grafted plants yielded nearly twice as much as non-grafted plants, suggesting that grafting can be a promising technology for Arizona watermelon producers.
    • Powdery Mildew

      Olsen, Mary W.; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      Powdery mildew, a plant disease, appears as white, powdery spots on the leaf surface of several different kinds of plants. They are specific to their hosts and one type will infect only certain plants, usually those in the same or closely related plant families. This publication discusses the symptoms, environmental conditions, disease of powdery mildew and the methods used to prevent / control this plant disease.
    • Preparation and Use of Seedbed

      Wood, C. J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1937-03)
    • Process of Conducting Research on the Colorado River Indian Tribes (C.R.I.T.) Reservation, Arizona

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Masters, Linda; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet briefly describes the research protocol of the Colorado River Indian Tribes reservation.
    • Process of Conducting Research on the Hopi Reservation, Arizona

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Livingston, Matt; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet briefly describes the research protocol of the Hopi reservation.
    • Process of Conducting Research on the Hualapai Reservation, Arizona

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Crowley, Terry; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet briefly describes research protocol on the Hualapai reservation.
    • Process of Conducting Research on the Navajo Nation

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Moore, Gerald; Benally, Jeannie; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet describes research and research protocol with audiences on the Navajo reservation.
    • Protecting a Citrus Tree from Cold

      Wright, Glenn C.; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-03)
      Citrus trees are not particularly cold hardy, but they are most likely to survive cold temperatures if they are planted in the proper location. This publication focuses on how to help citrus trees survive the winters of Arizona. Topics include site selection and long-term / short-term strategies used to protect citrus trees from frost and freeze.