• Questions to Ask When Planning to Start a Wholesale Plant Nursery

      Schuch, Ursula; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-04)
      This publication is an introduction for individuals interested in starting their own business specializing in wholesale nursery production. The bulletin provides an overview of different types of nursery production, common production types in the Southwestern United States, starting the business, economic considerations, and a resource section.
    • Questions to ask when planning to start a wholesale plant nursery

      Schuch, Ursula K. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-07)
      The plant nursery business is complex and requires knowledge about the technical aspects of growing plants and managing a business. This publication is an introduction for those interested in starting their own wholesale nursery business. Different types of production systems - container and field production- are discussed as well as the types of plants typically grown in Southwest nurseries. Starting a business involves many decisions that will culminate in the development of a business plan. Resources for new producers include national, regional, and local trade organizations. A worksheet with questions is included to help future operators consider whether they want to start a new wholesale production nursery. Publication AZ1393 Revised 07/2017. Originally published 2006
    • Recommendations for Growing Standard-Height Wheat Varieties in Arizona

      Ottman, Michael; Hought, Joy M.; School of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona; Native Seeds/Search (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-01)
      Until the introduction of semi-dwarf wheat in the late 1960s, wheat varieties were typically one and a half to two times their current height. Most heirloom, traditional, or landrace varieties are considered standard-height wheat (e.g. Sonoran white); in general they are adapted to lower-input conditions, and cannot tolerate high-fertility environments without lodging. Lodging reduces grain yield, delays harvest, and increases harvesting costs. Standard-height wheat needs to be grown at a lower plant density and with less nitrogen and irrigation water than semi-dwarfs in order to prevent lodging, optimize yield, and make the most efficient use of resources.
    • Renovating Alfalfa Stands in Arizona

      Loper, Shawna; Ottman, Mike; Area Extension Agent, Agriculture; School of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-02)
      Introduction: Alfalfa is an important crop grown in Arizona with approximately 250,000 acres in production in 2011 and 2012 and 260,000 acres for 2013 (USDA, NASS 2013). A typical yield for Arizona alfalfa growers is approximately 8.2 tons per acre (USDA, NASS). In central Arizona where fields are irrigated, harvest typically starts in March and lasts until November, with majority of production occurring from March to mid-July. Central Arizona producers will typically keep stands for three to four years before rotating. Older alfalfa stands age and thin and will eventually decline in plant density and yield (Figure 1). Producers often wish to improve their stands by reseeding after a failed seeding, thinning, or summer scalding.
    • Research in Indian Country

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Adolf, Melvina; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet describes research and research protocol with audiences on Indian reservations.
    • Row Spacing Effect on Forage Sorghum Yield and Quality at Maricopa, AZ, 2015

      Ottman, Michael J; Diaz, Duarte E; Sheedy, Michael D; Ward, Richard W; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-02)
      Forage sorghum yields have been should to increase with narrow row spacing of 20 inches or less. The purpose of this research is to determine the effect of narrow row spacing on forage sorghum yield and quality in Arizona. Two row spacing (20 and 40 inch) and two forage sorghum hybrids (Great Scott and Silo 700D BMR) were evaluated in a study conducted at the University of Arizona Maricopa Agricultural Center in 2015. Row spacing had no effect on forage yield, moisture, plant height, or maturity even though light interception was greater for the closer row spacing. The only feed quality parameter affected by row spacing was lactic acid which increased with row spacing. Hybrid by row spacing interactions was detected for a few feed quality parameters. Decreasing forage sorghum row spacing from 40 to 20 inches does not appear to have an advantage based on the results of this study.
    • Safflower Production in Arizona

      Dennis, R. E.; Rubis, D. D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1966-01)
    • Saline and Sodic Soil Identification and Cotton Management

      Silvertooth, J.C.; Plant Sciences, School of | SRNR (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-02)
    • The San Carlos Apache Reservation and Extension Programs

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet describes the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the San Carlos Apache reservation, as well as the history of extension and effective extension programs and collaborations conducted on this reservation.
    • The San Carlos Apache Reservation Quick Facts

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet briefly describes the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the San Carlos Apache reservation.
    • Seed Potatoes: Selection And Disinfection

      Brown, J. G.; Streets, R. B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1931-06)
    • Seeding Rates for Small Grains in Arizona

      Ottman, Michael; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004-03)
      The influence of crop species, seed size, seed viability, seed depth,irrigation practices,stand establishment and uniformity, seeding equipment, planting date, crop variety, and planting configuration on optimum seeding rate for small grains is discussed.
    • Seeding rates for small grains in Arizona

      Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-05)
      Wheat and barley are the two major small grain crops in Arizona. These crops can produce yields near maximum at a wide range of seeding rates due to yield component compensation. Grain yield is determined by plants per unit area, tillers per plant, kernels per head, and kernel weight. At a low seeding rate, the plant will compensate for fewer plants per unit area by producing more tillers per plant and larger heads. At a high seeding rate, fewer tillers are produced compared to a low seeding rate, and the heads are smaller. Therefore, grain yields near maximum can be produced at a wide range of seeding rates if conditions are favorable (see Fig. 1). Weed control can be a problem at low seeding rates and lodging may be a problem at high seeding rates. The optimum seeding rate for small grains depends on a variety of factors which will be discussed
    • Small Grain Growth and Development

      Ottman, Michael; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004-09)
      Growing degree days to reach various growth stages in small grains is presented in this publication, as well as the optimum timing of cultural practices relative to crop growth stage.
    • Small Grains Variety Evaluation at Maricopa, 2016

      Ottman, Michael J; Sheedy, Michael D; Ward, Richard W (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-11)
      Small grain varieties are evaluated each year by University of Arizona personnel. The purpose of these tests is to characterize varieties in terms of yield and other attributes. Variety performance varies greatly from year to year and several site-years are necessary to adequately characterize the yield potential of a variety. A summary of small grain variety trials conducted by the University of Arizona can be found online at https://extension.arizona.edu/sites/extension.arizona.edu/files/pubs/az1265-2015.pdf.
    • Soil Fertility and Soil Testing Guideline for Arizona Cotton

      Silvertooth, Jeffrey C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-06)
      According to all available evidence, there are 20 total nutrients necessary for complete plant growth and development. Not all are required for all plants, but all have been found to be essential to some.
    • Soil Management

      Ray, Howard E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1953-09)
    • Soil Management

      Amburgey, Lyman R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1964-07)
    • Soil Management

      Amburgey, Lyman R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1961-03)
    • Soil Management and Soil Testing for Irrigated Cotton Production

      Silvertooth, Jeffrey C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-06)
      In this article we will discuss various aspects of soil evaluation including physical examination, soil sampling and analysis, and soil test interpretation. We will also discuss how these approaches to soil evaluation can be incorporated into both short- and long-term management plans.