• Safflower Production in Arizona

      Dennis, R. E.; Rubis, D. D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1966-01)
    • Saline and Sodic Soil Identification and Cotton Management

      Silvertooth, J.C.; Plant Sciences, School of | SRNR (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-02)
    • The San Carlos Apache Reservation and Extension Programs

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet describes the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the San Carlos Apache reservation, as well as the history of extension and effective extension programs and collaborations conducted on this reservation.
    • The San Carlos Apache Reservation Quick Facts

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet briefly describes the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the San Carlos Apache reservation.
    • Seed Potatoes: Selection And Disinfection

      Brown, J. G.; Streets, R. B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1931-06)
    • Seeding Rates for Small Grains in Arizona

      Ottman, Michael; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004-03)
      The influence of crop species, seed size, seed viability, seed depth,irrigation practices,stand establishment and uniformity, seeding equipment, planting date, crop variety, and planting configuration on optimum seeding rate for small grains is discussed.
    • Seeding rates for small grains in Arizona

      Ottman, Michael J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-05)
      Wheat and barley are the two major small grain crops in Arizona. These crops can produce yields near maximum at a wide range of seeding rates due to yield component compensation. Grain yield is determined by plants per unit area, tillers per plant, kernels per head, and kernel weight. At a low seeding rate, the plant will compensate for fewer plants per unit area by producing more tillers per plant and larger heads. At a high seeding rate, fewer tillers are produced compared to a low seeding rate, and the heads are smaller. Therefore, grain yields near maximum can be produced at a wide range of seeding rates if conditions are favorable (see Fig. 1). Weed control can be a problem at low seeding rates and lodging may be a problem at high seeding rates. The optimum seeding rate for small grains depends on a variety of factors which will be discussed
    • Small Grain Growth and Development

      Ottman, Michael; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004-09)
      Growing degree days to reach various growth stages in small grains is presented in this publication, as well as the optimum timing of cultural practices relative to crop growth stage.
    • Small Grains Variety Evaluation at Maricopa, 2016

      Ottman, Michael J; Sheedy, Michael D; Ward, Richard W (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-11)
      Small grain varieties are evaluated each year by University of Arizona personnel. The purpose of these tests is to characterize varieties in terms of yield and other attributes. Variety performance varies greatly from year to year and several site-years are necessary to adequately characterize the yield potential of a variety. A summary of small grain variety trials conducted by the University of Arizona can be found online at https://extension.arizona.edu/sites/extension.arizona.edu/files/pubs/az1265-2015.pdf.
    • Soil Fertility and Soil Testing Guideline for Arizona Cotton

      Silvertooth, Jeffrey C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-06)
      According to all available evidence, there are 20 total nutrients necessary for complete plant growth and development. Not all are required for all plants, but all have been found to be essential to some.
    • Soil Management

      Ray, Howard E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1953-09)
    • Soil Management

      Amburgey, Lyman R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1964-07)
    • Soil Management

      Amburgey, Lyman R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1961-03)
    • Soil Management and Soil Testing for Irrigated Cotton Production

      Silvertooth, Jeffrey C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-06)
      In this article we will discuss various aspects of soil evaluation including physical examination, soil sampling and analysis, and soil test interpretation. We will also discuss how these approaches to soil evaluation can be incorporated into both short- and long-term management plans.
    • Soil Organic Matter

      Fuller, Wallace H. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1969-05)
    • Soil Organic Matter

      Fuller, Wallace H. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-03)
    • Soil Sampling and Analysis

      Walworth, J. L. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-10)
    • Soil Sampling and Analysis

      Walworth, James; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-07)
      Soil testing is comprised of four steps: Collection of a representative soil sample, laboratory analyses of the soil sample, interpretation of analytical results, and management recommendations based on interpreted analytical results.
    • Soil Structure: The Roles of Sodium and Salts (PowerPoint)

      Walworth, James (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-10)
    • Sonic Pest Repellents

      Aflitto, Nicholas; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-10)
      Commercially available sonic pest devices for use in residential applications have not been shown to be effective in scientific studies. For this reason, use of these devices is not advised to treat common pest problems. Although some researchers are developing sonic techniques that illustrate promise for very specific pests, these technologies are yet to be commercially available. As our understanding increases of how pest species receive and process sound, more relevant sonic devices may be developed. The allure of sound as a treatment for pests will remain into the future—motivated by the fact that if they are successful they will be more environmentally friendly and safer for humans.