• Growing Sweet Corn in Arizona

      Mikel, Terry; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-08)
      Sweet corn grown with completely filled rows of tender sweet kernels highlights any gardening venture. The gardeners grow it so consistently that it ranks second only to tomatoes in popularity of vegetables. To appreciate the reasons for its culture, this publication discusses the history, botany, culture of sweet corn, as well as the method to plant it.
    • Growing Wheat in Arizona

      Dennis, R. E.; Day, A. D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1967-08)
    • Growing Wheat in Arizona

      Dennis, R. E.; Day, A. D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1964-02)
    • Guidelines for the Control of Coniophora eremophila on Lemon Trees for Southwestern Arizona

      Matheron, Michael E.; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1996-01)
      Coniophora eremophila is the only known indigenous species of Coniophora found in the Sonoran desert. There is a limited amount of information available regarding the true biology of this fungus and the decay it causes in relation to cultural practices. Recent studies show that of the citrus cultivars grown in Yuma County, lemon trees are the most susceptible to infection and that rootstock does not appear to influence the growth of Coniophora eremophila. This publication discusses the biological facts of Coniophora eremophila, discribes the symptoms of diseases caused by it, and discusses ways to control it.
    • Guidelines for Using Non-Traditional Soil Additives

      Wang, Guangyao (Sam); Loper, Shawna; Nolte, Kurt; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-08)
    • Hegari in Arizona

      Thompson, G. E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1921-04)
    • The Hopi Reservation and Extension Programs

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Livingston, Matt; Benally, Jeannie; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet describes the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the Hopi reservation, as well as the history of extension and effective extension programs and collaborations conducted on this reservation.
    • The Hopi Reservation Quick Facts

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Livingston, Matt; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet briefly describes the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the Hopi reservation.
    • How to Improve Standard Farm Crops in Cochise County

      Paschall, A. L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1917-10)
    • How to Propagate Agaves and Cacti from Cuttings and Seed

      Kelly, Jack; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-01)
      Propagation of agaves and cacti from seed and cuttings is an easy-to-accomplish process. Cuttings and seed sown during the appropriate time of year using the methods discussed will produce numerous progeny.
    • The Hualapai Reservation and Extension Programs

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Long, Jonathan; Crowley, Terry; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet explores the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the Hualapai reservation, and includes the extension program methods which work well on the reservation as well as collaborators who work with extension.
    • The Hualapai Reservation Quick Facts

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Crowley, Terry; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet briefly describes the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the Hualapai reservation.
    • Integrating Variable Rate Technologies for Soil-applied Herbicides in Arizona Vegetable Production

      Nolte, Kurt; Siemens, Mark C.; Andrade-Sanchez, Pedro; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-02)
      Precision herbicide application is an effective tool for placing soil incorporated herbicides which have a tendency for soil adherence. And while field implementation depends on previous knowledge of soil textural variability (soil test and texture evaluations), site-specific technologies show promise for Arizona vegetable producers in non-uniform soils. Regardless of the method used for textural characterization, growers should keep in mind that textural differences do not change in the short/medium term, so the costs associated with defining texture-based management zones can be spread over many years.
    • An Introduction to the Use of Reference Strips for N Management in Durum Wheat

      Wang, Guangyao (Sam) (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-05)
    • Irish Potato Growing in the Irrigated Valleys of Pima County

      Brown, C. B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1926-10)
    • Irrigating in Arizona

      Turville, E. S.; Hitch, Donald L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1944-06)
    • Irrigation Interval Effect on Yield and Quality of Forage Sorghum at Maricopa, AZ, 2015

      Ottman, Michael J; Diaz, Duarte E; Sheedy, Michael D; Ward, Richard W (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-02)
      Sorghum has the advantage compared to corn in that it uses less water and fertilizer, but feeding quality of sorghum is usually less than corn. The purpose of this research is to compare the yield and quality of sorghum grown with differing frequency of irrigation water application. Forage sorghum was grown at the University of Arizona Maricopa Agricultural Center with irrigation intervals of 1, 2, and 3-weeks corresponding to 76, 44, and 37 inches of applied water. Forage yield at 72% moisture was 20.6, 18.8, and 16.5 tons/acre for the 1-, 2-, and 3-week irrigation intervals, respectively. Forage quality in terms of milk per ton of forage was not affected by irrigation interval, but some differences were measured in certain components of feed quality. Forage yield profit was maximized at the 2-week irrigation interval due since the increased water cost of the 1-week interval was not compensated by the yield increase at this irrigation frequency.
    • Irrigation of Small Grains in Arizona

      Ottman, Michael; Husman, Steve; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004-09)
      Water use, critical soil water depletion, and irrigation scheduling for wheat and barley are explained in this publication.
    • Irrigation, When? How Much? How?

      Halderman, Allan D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1962-01)
    • Irrigation: When? How Much? How?

      Halderman, Allan D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1966-03)