• The Colorado River Indian Tribes (C.R.I.T.) Reservation and Extension Programs

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Masters, Linda; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet describes the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the CRIT reservation, as well as the history of extension and effective extension programs and collaborations conducted on this reservation.
    • The Colorado River Indian Tribes (C.R.I.T.) Reservation Quick Facts

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Masters, Linda; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet briefly describes the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the Colorado River Indian Tribes reservation.
    • Commercially Available Cotton Height-Controlling PGRs in Arizona

      Wang, Guangyao (Sam); Norton, Randy (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-01)
    • Common Insect Contaminants Found in Arizona Lettuce

      Kerns, David L.; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-02)
      This publication describes the common insects found in Arizona lettuce through the use of pictures. The insects include; lepidopterous larva, striped flea beetle, leafminer fly, leafminer mine, adult western flower thrips, winged adult aphid, false chinch bug, lygus bug, potato leafhopper, and threecornered alfalfa hopper.
    • Como Medir el Flujo de Agua en los Canales de Riego a Cielo Abierto y en las Tuberias de Computeras (Spanish)

      Martin, Edward; Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-12)
      Measuring water is a critical part of any irrigation management system. This informational bulletin gives some simplistic methods of measuring flow rate in an open ditch and in gated pipe. Using the float method, dye tracers and velocity head meters, growers can get a quick estimate of the flow in their farm ditch. From this, an estimate of water applied or a set time can be determined. The bulletin also explains how a propeller meter works for gated pipe. Gated pipe is widely used through the state and in the West.
    • Compost Tea 101: What Every Organic Gardener Should Know

      Joe, Valerisa; Rock, Channah; McLain, Jean; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-08)
      Growers of organic produce in the Southwestern United States face many challenges, including variation in water and temperature, and exposure to insects and disease. As a result, smallholder organic farmers are increasingly relying on soil additives such as compost tea that improve product quality, use less water, deter pests, and reduce reliance on chemical additives (Diver, 2002). But what exactly is compost tea? Do the benefits of using compost tea outweigh any concerns? For example, can it contain pathogens, and if so, do applicators have to worry about coming into contact with pathogens? This publication provides facts about making compost tea, and reviews both the benefits and potential disadvantages to help smallholder farmers to make educated decisions regarding the use of compost tea.
    • Conducting Research Projects on the San Carlos Apache Reservation, Arizona

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet briefly describes the research protocol of the San Carlos Apache Tribe reservation.
    • Confirm and Success: New Tools for Insect Management in Cole Crops and Leafy Green Vegetables in Arizona

      Kerns, David L.; Palumbo, John C.; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1997-12)
    • Control of Brown Wood Rot in Lemons with Low Pressure Injection 2012

      Wright, Glenn C.; Department of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona; Yuma Agriculture Center, Yuma, AZ (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-02)
      We injected AGRA PHOS (Potassium Phosphite) 0-2.4-2, Propaconizole – 0.05%, Propaconizole plus Azoxystrobin – 0.117 and 0.135% respectively, Zn, Mn and Fe 0.105, 0.112, and 0.10% respectively, and Azoxystrobin – 0.137% using a low pressure injection system for the control of Antrodia sinuosa in lemon trees. The Propaconizole + Azoxystrobin treatment, the Azoxystrobin treatment, and the Zn + Mn + Fe treatment led to significantly less fungal lesion growth when applied prior to the introduction of the fungus, as compared to their application after fungal introduction.
    • Control of Brown Wood Rot in Lemons with Low Pressure Injection 2013-14

      Wright, Glenn C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-09)
      We injected AGRA PHOS (Potassium Phosphite) 0-2.4-2, Propiconizole – 0.05%, Zn, Mn and Fe 0.105, 0.112, and 0.10% respectively, Zn, Mn and Fe 0.210, 0.220, and 0.200% respectively and Propiconizole – 0.05% + Zn, Mn and Fe 0.105, 0.112, and 0.10% respectively using a low pressure injection system for the control of Antrodia sinuosa in lemon trees. No treatment led to a significant reduction in fungal growth.
    • Control of Phymatotrichum (Cotton or Texas) Root Rot in Arizona

      Streets, R. B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1938-04-15)
    • Converting Reference Evapotranspiration into Turf Water Use

      Brown, Paul; Kopec, Dave; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-12)
      This document describes the procedures used to adjust ETo for use on managed turf surfaces in Arizona.
    • Cotton (Texas) Root Rot

      Olsen, Mary (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-02)
      The most important disease of woody dicotyledonous plants in Arizona is Phymatotrichopsis root rot (Cotton or Texas root rot) caused by a unique and widely distributed soil-borne fungus, Phymatotrichopsis omnivora. The fungus is indigenous to the alkaline, low-organic matter soils of the southwestern United States and central and northern Mexico.
    • Cotton Heat Stress

      Brown, Paul; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-02)
      Upland cotton is vulnerable to heat stress during the summer monsoon season in the low desert of Arizona. The primary impact of heat stress is a reduction in fruit retention which can reduce overall lint yields, delay crop maturity and reduce lint quality. This bulletin provides a general overview of cotton heat stress as it pertains to Arizona production systems.
    • Cómo Convertir de Galones a Pulgadas, y Determinar el Tiempo de Operación Para los Sistemas de Riego por Goteo en Cultivos en Surcos

      Martin, Edward C.; Barreto, Armando (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-02)
      La conversión de sistemas de riego por gravedad a sistemas por goteo requiere más que la inversión de capital. Los agricultores y regadores deben adaptar sus estrategias de manejo para dar acomodo al nuevo sistema de riego. En particular, los sistemas por goteo no están diseñados para aplicar las grandes candidades de agua de riego que la mayoría de los sistemas por gravedad sí son capaces de aplicar. Dependiendo del diseño y distribución del sistema por goteo, este sistema puede tomar varias horas para aplicar una pulgada de agua a la parcela, mientras que la mayoría de los sistemas por gravedad pueden aplicar de 4 a 8 pulgadas en 12 horas. Debido a esta diferencia, los agricultores que utilizan sistemas por goteo necesitan monitorear muy de cerca la condición de humedad del suelo de sus campos regados por goteo y regar apropiadamente. Reviewed 01/2017; Originally Published 05/2011.
    • Cómo Determinar la Cantidad de Agua de Riego Aplicada a una Parcela

      Martin, Edward C.; Munoz, Carolina (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-02)
      La estimación acertada de la cantidad de agua aplicada a una parcela es crítica para cualquier esquema de manejo del riego. Muy a menudo, los agricultores aplican agua para hacer que la parcela y los surcos “se vean bien” (oscurecer las camas de los surcos) o continuan regando hasta que el agua llega al final de cada surco. Sin embargo, con frecuencia no tienen una idea precisa de cuanta agua han aplicado. Cuando los agricultores no toman en cuenta la eficiencia de sus sistemas de riego, pueden estar aplicando demasiada o muy poca agua. Muy poca agua ocasiona un estrés hídrico innecesario y puede resultar en reducciones de rendimiento. Demasiada agua puede causar estancamiento del agua, pérdida de nutrientes por excesiva infiltración y puede resultar en una pérdida de la cosecha. Reviewed 01/2017; Originally Published 04/2011.
    • Cómo Medir el Flujo de Agua en los Canales de Riego a Cielo Abierto y en las Tuberías de Compuertas

      Martin, Edward C.; Munoz, Carolina (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-02)
      La medición del agua en los sistemas de riego por gravedad es crítica para obtener el manejo óptimo y eficiente del agua. Sin conocer la cantidad de agua que se está aplicando a la parcela es difícil decidir adecuadamente cuando parar o cuándo hacer el siguiente riego. Para que un regador haga un manejo adecuado del agua debe saber el caudal o gasto, el tiempo total del riego y el tamaño de la superficie regada. A partir de estos datos se puede determinar la cantidad de agua que se aplicó a la parcela, lo cual entonces ayudará a determinar si el riego fue adecuado o no y cuándo se debería hacer el siguiente riego. Las decisiones en cuanto al manejo del riego deben hacerse en base a la cantidad de agua aplicada y a su relación con la demanda de consumo de las plantas y la capacidad del suelo para retener el agua. Revised 01/2017; Originally Published 12/2010.
    • Crop Growth and Development for Irrigated Chile (Capiscum annuum)

      Silvertooth, J.C.; Brown, Paul; Walker, Stephanie; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-09)
    • Cross-commodity Guidelines for Neonicotinoid Insecticides in Arizona

      Palumbo, John C.; Ellsworth, Peter C.; Dennehy, Timothy J.; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2003-05)
      Arizona enjoys a sustained recovery from the devastating whitefly outbreaks of the early 1990's. This success is built on an IPM strategy that includes the use of selective and effective chemistry. Admire has been a key soil insecticide protecting vegetables and produce throughout Arizona and is the first member of a burgeoning class of chemistry known as the neonicotinoids. New members of this valuable, reduced-risk, class of chemistry are now available to agricultural producers, placing a burden on users of these compounds to adopt rational plans for sustaining their efficacy. This consensus document represents our best guess efforts to limit and share this chemistry among different agricultural interests. Our goal is to preserve the long-term efficacy of the neonicotinoids and protect growers' interests in sustainable and economical whitefly management. Through identification of crop communities (i.e., "multi-crop", "cotton-intensive", and "cotton/melon") common to Arizona agriculture, we have sculpted sensible plans of use that should allow access to this valuable chemistry for everyone, while protecting it from resistance.
    • Cultural Practices for Karnal Bunt Control

      Ottman, Michael J (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-05)
      Environmental conditions between awn emergence and the end of flowering is the overriding factor in disease development. 2 The University of Arizona Cooperative Extension Cultural practices may be partially effective in controlling Karnal bunt but cannot eliminate the disease completely. Karnal bunt is most likely to be found in areas where lodging or water ponding have occurred.