• Agricultural Use of Recycled Water for Crop Production in Arizona

      Cusimano, Jeremy; McLain, Jean E.; Eden, Susanna; Rock, Channah M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-06)
      Agriculture is by far the largest water-demanding sector in Arizona, accounting for 70% of water demand (ADWR, 2009). Arizona’s agriculture industry is extremely diversified, producing many crops that can legally be irrigated with recycled water, including cotton, alfalfa, wheat, citrus, and vegetables. Throughout the State, farming communities are taking advantage of increasing supplies of recycled water.
    • Antibacterial Products in Septic Systems

      Farrell-Poe, Kitt; Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-03)
      An onsite sewage treatment system or "septic system" is effective way to safely recycle household wastewater back into the natural environment. The key to effective treatment is proper design, system installation, responsible operation, and periodic maintenance. This article provides information about how to improve septic system performance by taking simple steps at home.
    • Arizona Aquifers

      Artiola, Janick (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-07)
      About 5% of Arizona's population depends on private wells for fresh water and more than 40% of our annual water use comes from Arizona's aquifers. Following a brief introduction to regulations, requirements and equipment used for drilling a private well in Arizona, this video presents the geologic origins of Arizona's aquifer materials with illustrations and pictures of AZ aquifers. Finally, aquifers are ranked by their ability to store and produce water.
    • Arizona Domestic Water Wells

      Uhlman, Kristine; Artiola, Janick (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-07)
      Arizona has stringent permit requirements for submitting a notice of intent to drill a new water supply well for domestic use. The construction diagram and geologic log of all wells in the state are recorded with the Arizona Department of Water Resources (ADWR). The ADWR website – www.AzWater.gov/AzDWR/ —provides a wealth of information for the private domestic well owner. Well owners are responsible for the registration, repair, maintenance and up to-date record-keeping of their own wells and to monitor water quality to assure safe drinking water.
    • Arizona Domestic Water Wells

      Uhlman, Kristine; Artiola, Janick; Water Resources Research Center (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-11)
      Arizona has stringent permit requirements for the construction of water wells, but domestic well owners are responsible for repair and maintenance of their own wells to assure a reliable water supply of consistent quality. For the proper maintenance of domestic wells, it is important to have a basic understanding about the different materials that comprise a home water supply system. This fact sheet presents information about Arizona domestic well components, including well casings, well caps, well screens, and pitless adapters; basic materials that combine with a pump to provide water for a household.
    • Arizona Drinking Water Well Contaminants

      Uhlman, Kristine; Rock, Channah; Artiola, Janick; Water Resources Research Center (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-11)
      Arizona well water is often contaminated with elevated concentrations of naturally occurring constituents that are a human health concern. This short fact sheet is the first in a two-part series about what naturally occurring contaminants may be found in your water supply well and includes a brief discussion on environmental pollutants that originate from land use activities. If you own a well in Arizona, you have the sole responsibility for checking to see if your drinking water is contaminated. Arizona state law does not require private well owners to test or treat their water for purity. The second part of this series outlines what to sample for and how to understand your analytical results.
    • An Arizona Guide to Domestic Well Registration and Record-Keeping

      Artiola, Janick F.; Hix, Gary (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-05)
      All Arizona wells must be registered with the ADWR. Domestic private well are not overseen or regulated by ADEQ. The well owner has the responsibility for maintaining and ownership status of the well and is also responsible for its operating performance and for checking its water quality. The purpose of this publication is to assist well owners to check the registration of their well by searching the ADWR imaged records files, and how to keep well installation and maintenance records current.
    • An Arizona Guide to Water Quality and Uses

      Artiola, Janick F.; Hix, Gary; Gerba, Charles; Riley, James J.; Department of Soil, Water & Environmental Science; Arizona Water Well Association; Department of Soil, Water & Environmental Science; Department of Soil, Water & Environmental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-01)
      Introduction: Adult human beings may drink up to two liters/day (approx. two quarts/day) of fresh water to stay alive. However, we can consume up to two quarts/hour of water, depending on the level of activity, ambient temperature, and humidity conditions (Born 2013). We also need fresh water to cook with and to clean ourselves. About 40% of our food production depends on irrigation (UN Water 2013) using water with low salinity and other contaminants. Climate scientists project increasing temperatures and possibly less rainfall in the Southwest now and into the near future, see Extension Publication #AZ1458 (Artiola et al. 2008). Thus, climate change is likely to stress the limited water resources of Arizona and affect water quality by concentrating contaminants and stressing water-dependent environments. This publication presents brief summaries of the types of water sources, their water quality, and possible uses in Arizona. Since the types and amounts of constituents found in water, whether nutrients, pathogens, contaminants or pollutants, help determine its possible uses, it is necessary to measure water quality to determine treatment options for a given use. To assist in this task, we present a triangle-shaped diagram (Figure 8) which divides water quality into three major groups: Pathogens, Salinity, and Specific Contaminants, placing major water sources in relation to the three groups. Home and well owners can use this diagram as a general aid to evaluate various sources of water, determine their likely water quality, and identify appropriate uses for them.
    • Arizona Project WET Water Festivals: A Summative Evaluation

      Schwartz, Kerry; Thomas-Hilburn, Holly; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-07)
      The Make a Splash with Project WET Arizona Water Festival program is in its ninth year and served 12 communities in the 2008-2009 school year. The program trained 622 volunteers to deliver engaging water education to 6,924 fourth graders and their 313 teachers. With the support of the Bureau of Reclamation, Arizona Project WET has conducted a summative evaluation, and is able to use that information to further increase the effectiveness of the program while simultaneously documenting successes in student learning and community engagement in water education.
    • Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide: Arizona Weather & Climate

      Emanuel, Robert; Garfin, Gregg; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005)
      Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide was created to help individuals and groups build a mutual foundation of basic knowledge about watersheds in Arizona. It is intended to help Arizonans understand and be good stewards of their watersheds. This guide was designed to compliment the mission of the Arizona Master Watershed Steward Program to educate and train citizens across the state to serve as volunteers in the monitoring, restoration, conservation, and protection of their water and watersheds. This guide consists of 10 self-contained modules which teach one or more important aspects of watershed science or management to a public adult audience.
    • Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide: Geologic Processes

      Pater, Susan; McReynolds, Kim; Uhlman, Kristine; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005)
      Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide was created to help individuals and groups build a mutual foundation of basic knowledge about watersheds in Arizona. It is intended to help Arizonans understand and be good stewards of their watersheds. The guide was designed to compliment the mission of Arizona Master Watershed Steward program to educate and train citizens across the state of Arizona to serve as volunteers in the restoration, conservation, monitoring, and protection of their water and watersheds. The guide consists of 10 self-contained modules which teach about important aspects of watershed science and management.
    • Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide: Life in the Watershed -- Part I: Watershed Ecology

      Emanuel, Robert; Radden, Russ; Clark, Richard J.; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005)
      Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide was created to help individuals and groups build a mutual foundation of basic knowledge about watersheds in Arizona. It is intended to help Arizonans understand and be good stewards of their watersheds. The guide was designed to compliment the mission of Arizona Master Watershed Steward program to educate and train citizens across the state of Arizona to serve as volunteers in the monitoring, restoration, conservation, and protection of their water and watersheds. The guide consists of 10 self-contained modules which teach about one or more important aspects of watershed science or management.
    • Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide: Regional and State Water Management

      Emanuel, Robert; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005)
      Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide was created to help individuals and groups build a mutual foundation of basic knowledge about watersheds in Arizona. It is intended to help Arizonans understand and be good stewards of their watersheds. The guide was designed to compliment the mission of Arizona Master Watershed Steward program to educate and train citizens across the state of Arizona to serve as volunteers in the monitoring, restoration, conservation, and protection of their water and watersheds. The guide consists of 10 self-contained modules which teach about one or more important aspects of watershed science or management.
    • Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide: Water Quality & Monitoring

      Farrell-Poe, Kitt; Payne, Will; Emanuel, Robert; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005)
      Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide was created to help individuals and groups build a mutual foundation of basic knowledge about watersheds in Arizona. It is intended to help Arizonans understand and be good stewards of their watersheds. The guide was designed to compliment the mission of Arizona Master Watershed Steward program to educate and train citizens across the state of Arizona to serve as volunteers in the restoration, conservation, monitoring, and protection of their water and watersheds. The guide consists of 10 self-contained modules which teach about important aspects of watershed science and management.
    • Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide: Watershed Basic -- Part I: Water Resources

      McReynolds, Kim; Pater, Susan; Uhlman, Kristine; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005)
      Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide was created to help individuals and groups build a mutual foundation of basic knowledge about watersheds in Arizona. It is intended to help Arizonans understand and be good stewards of their watersheds. The guide was designed to compliment the mission of Arizona Master Watershed Steward program to educate and train citizens across the state of Arizona to serve as volunteers in the restoration, conservation, monitoring, and protection of their water and watersheds. The guide consists of 10 self-contained modules which teach about important aspects of watershed science and management.
    • Arizona Well Owners' Guide to Water Supply

      Artiola, Janick; Uhlman, Kristine; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009)
      This well owners guide presents detailed sections to assist the reader in becoming familiar with water quality concepts, drinking water guidelines and water testing. The reader can also become familiar with Arizona specific aquifers, conditions and activities that determine ground water quality. Well owners can also review and become familiar with well construction, components and maintenance needed for the safe and proper function of their wells. Finally, a section on water treatment technologies and selection, based on water quality conditions is presented. Well owners will be able to refer to this section for the selection of water treatments, should they choose to improve the water quality of their wells. Includes numerous illustrations.
    • Arizona Wells: Low Yielding Domestic Water Wells

      Uhlman, Kristine; Artiola, Janick; Water Resources Research Center (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      To develop a ground water resource, it is necessary to design and construct a well capable of yielding a pumping rate compatible with the needs of the water well owner. Sufficient and sustained well yields are highly dependent on the characteristics of the aquifer, the construction of the well, and the maintenance of the well. Causes of low-yielding wells are explained and practices to restore well performance are recommended.
    • Arizona Wells: Maintaining and Troubleshooting Wells

      Artiola, Janick F.; Uhlman, Kristine; Hix, Gary L. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-09)
    • Arizona's Blue Ribbon Panel on Water Sustainability

      Rock, Channah; Graf, Chuck; Scott, Christopher; McLain, Jean E.; Megdal, Sharon (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-05)
    • Arizona: Know Your Water

      Artiola, Janick F.; Farrell-Poe, Kathryn L.; Moxley, Jacqueline C. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-10)