• How to Lower the Levels of Arsenic in Well Water: What Choices do Arizona Consumers Have?

      Artiola, Janick F; Wilkinson, Sarah T (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-03)
      Arsenic levels are often above drinking water standards in Arizona groundwater, at levels that may affect health. Private well owners are responsible for testing and treating they own water. This publication gives an overview of arsenic well water and discusses home water treatment options, including detailed descriptions of distillation, reverse osmosis, and iron filters to lower arsenic and other common water constituents in drinking water.
    • Doing our Part to Help Conserve Arizona's Water Resources and Reduce Global Warming by Saving Energy at Home

      Artiola, Janick; Crimmins, Michael; Yoklic, Martin (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-01)
      Climate change is affecting Arizona's Water Resources adversely and water use is linked to energy consumption. This publication discusses the effects of global warming on the environment and provides tips on how to conserve electricity at home.
    • Working with Non-Profit Organizations – Cooperative Extension’s Opportunity to Expand Its Reach

      Apel, Mark B.; Warren, Peter L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-12)
      This article describes the advantages and benefits of collaborations between Cooperative Extension and non-profit organizations in terms of increasing Extension's outreach capacity and assisting non-profits. Guidelines are provided for Extension personnel interested in working with non-profits.
    • Water Use in Vegetables - Carrots

      Martin, Edward C.; Slack, Donald C.; Pegelow, E. J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-10)
      The publication discusses water use in carrot production in Arizona.
    • Water Use in Vegetables - Cauliflower

      Martin, Edward C.; Slack, Donald C.; Pegelow, E. J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-10)
      This publication discusses water use in cauliflower production in Arizona.
    • Water Use in Vegetables - Dry Bulb Onions

      Martin, Edward C.; Slack, Donald C.; Pegelow, E. J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-10)
      This publication discusses water in in dry bulb onion production in Arizona.
    • Measuring Water Flow and Rate on the Farm

      Martin, Edward C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-10)
      Proper water management involves two basic considerations: when and how much irrigation water to apply. The timing of an irrigation event (the when) involves utilizing information on plant needs and soil water conditions. How much depends primarily on the soil’s water holding capacity, the depletion level and the rooting depth of the crop. Once you have calculated how much water to apply, how can you be sure that you have accurately applied that amount? Or, if you miss your target amount, how do you determine how much water you actually applied? The amount of water applied to a field is a function of time, flow and area. The time of an irrigation is easily recorded. The amount of area irrigated is also easily calculated. However, estimating flow rate in an open ditch is often guess work, at best. In this bulletin we shall discuss ways to measure water flow in an open ditch.
    • Methods of Measuring for Irrigation Scheduling - WHEN

      Martin, Edward C. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-10)
      Proper irrigation management requires that growers assess their irrigation needs by taking measurements of various physical parameters. Some use sophisticated equipment while others use tried and true common sense approaches. Whichever method used, each has merits and limitations. In developing any irrigation management strategy, two questions are common: “When do I irrigate?” and “How much do I apply?” This bulletin deals with the WHEN.
    • Using Watershed Assessments to Inform Planning for Rural Watersheds

      Lien, Aaron M.; Mott Lacroix, Kelly; Banister, Katie; Megdal, Sharon B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-07)
      The Using Watershed Assessments to Inform Planning for Rural Watersheds publication provides a process for developing a baseline watershed assessment. In this guide we provide recommendations for engaging with stakeholders to assess natural resource conditions, as well as basic information to collect to create a baseline assessment. Watershed planning is not a simple, quick process. This guide addresses just the first steps of building a watershed assessment– understanding the current conditions and issues facing your watershed. Beyond the watershed assessment phase is the hard work of utilizing the information from the assessment, along with the results of additional stakeholder feedback, to develop an actual watershed plan. This guide provides an outline of how to complete the watershed assessment portion of your watershed planning effort, but does not provide a detailed step-by-step process. Rather, this document is intended as a resource to help guide you in your efforts by providing suggestions based on real-world watershed planning experience.
    • Sprinkler Irrigation

      Schwalen, H. C.; Frost, K. R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1963-01)
    • How to Make a Plastered Concrete Water-Storage Tank

      Welchert, W. T.; McDougal, J. N. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1965-07)
    • Converting Reference Evapotranspiration Into Turf Water Use

      Brown, Paul; Kopec, Dave (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-02)
      Introduction: Accurate estimates of turf water use are required to effectively manage a turf irrigation system. In Volume I of this series entitled “Basics of Evaporation and Evapotranspiration (ET),” we indicated that actual turf water use (ETt) is rarely measured in the real world. Instead, we use meteorological data and a mathematical model known as the Penman-Monteith Equation to estimate reference evapotranspiration (ETos) — the ET from a tall, cool-season grass that is supplied with adequate water. In the lower elevations of Arizona the ETos value would seem of limited value since we rarely grow turf that is equivalent to the reference surface. However, we get around this problem by adjusting the ETos value to account for differences in turf type, quality and stage of development. This document describes the procedures used to adjust ETos for use on managed turf surfaces in Arizona.
    • Water Management

      Middleton, James E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1952-10)
    • Water Management

      Middleton, James E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1953-10)
    • An Arizona Guide to Water Quality and Uses

      Artiola, Janick F.; Hix, Gary; Gerba, Charles; Riley, James J.; Department of Soil, Water & Environmental Science; Arizona Water Well Association; Department of Soil, Water & Environmental Science; Department of Soil, Water & Environmental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-01)
      Introduction: Adult human beings may drink up to two liters/day (approx. two quarts/day) of fresh water to stay alive. However, we can consume up to two quarts/hour of water, depending on the level of activity, ambient temperature, and humidity conditions (Born 2013). We also need fresh water to cook with and to clean ourselves. About 40% of our food production depends on irrigation (UN Water 2013) using water with low salinity and other contaminants. Climate scientists project increasing temperatures and possibly less rainfall in the Southwest now and into the near future, see Extension Publication #AZ1458 (Artiola et al. 2008). Thus, climate change is likely to stress the limited water resources of Arizona and affect water quality by concentrating contaminants and stressing water-dependent environments. This publication presents brief summaries of the types of water sources, their water quality, and possible uses in Arizona. Since the types and amounts of constituents found in water, whether nutrients, pathogens, contaminants or pollutants, help determine its possible uses, it is necessary to measure water quality to determine treatment options for a given use. To assist in this task, we present a triangle-shaped diagram (Figure 8) which divides water quality into three major groups: Pathogens, Salinity, and Specific Contaminants, placing major water sources in relation to the three groups. Home and well owners can use this diagram as a general aid to evaluate various sources of water, determine their likely water quality, and identify appropriate uses for them.
    • An Economic Survey of Salt River Valley Project in Maricopa County, Arizona

      University of Arizona: Agricultural Extension Service (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1929-06)
    • Water Storage and the Water Code

      Smith, G. E. P. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1918-12)
    • The Proposed Water Code

      Smith, G. E. P. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1916-11)
    • What Well Owners Should Know About Shock Chlorination: Why It Works For Some Well Problems And Not For Others

      Artiola, Janick F.; Hix, Gary; Gerba, Charles; Farrell-Poe, Kitt; Department of Soil Water & Environmental Science, University of Arizona; Arizona Water Well Association; Department of Soil Water & Environmental Science, University of Arizona; Department of Agricultural Biosystems and Engineering, University of Arizona (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-09)
    • Well Components

      Artiola, Janick (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-07)
      Private well owners should also be familiar with above-ground well components for maintenance and emergency purposes. This video describes well components such as bladder tanks and pressure controls, their common locations and how to inspect them.