• Ideas for Picky Eaters

      Keeling, Heidi L.; Florian Armstrong, Traci L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-08)
      Parents of picky eaters often find it challenging to motivate their children to eat healthy, balanced meals. Two important goals of ensuring healthy lifestyles for our children include teaching them about the importance of a balanced, nutritious diet, and modeling healthy meals at home. For parents of picky eaters, this can seem like an impossible task!
    • Folate & Folic Acid- Healthy Moms Mean Healthy Babies

      Zilliox, Trish; da Silva, Vanessa (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-03)
      Before they may even know they are pregnant; women’s bodies and their level of folate play a critical role in preventing certain birth defects, specifically neural tube defects (NTDs). NTDs are birth defects in the brain, spinal cord, or spine. Considered ‘one of the most important public health discoveries of this century’ is that daily supplemental folic acid taken before becoming pregnant significantly reduces the risk of NTDs (1). In 1998, the United States made sweeping efforts that fortified cereal grains with folic acid to ensure all Americans consume adequate amounts of this vitamin. So what exactly is folate? What are the functions of this vitamin? What foods have high levels of folate and what is the recommended daily intake? This article will answer these questions and will go on to explain folic acid fortification and the impact fortification has had on the incidence of NTDs in Arizona.
    • Getting Your Preschooler to Eat Fruits and Vegetables: Tips for Parents of Children Ages 3 to 5

      McDonald, Dan; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-01)
      Many parents struggle with getting their preschool age children (3 to 5 years of age) to eat fruits and vegetables, or having them try a fruit or vegetable that is new to them or prepared in a new way. Reluctance to eat certain foods or try new foods may be a way for children to express some control over at least this one small part of their lives. As with other aspects of parenting, it’s important not to turn the situation into a power struggle. Rather, it is best to be patient and realize that it may take many attempts before a child will try a new fruit or vegetable, or go back to eating a fruit or vegetable they claim not to like. Some basic suggestions are to continue to offer a variety of fruits and vegetables, eat fruits and vegetables yourself, and allow your children to participate in selecting and preparing fruits and vegetables for them to eat. Below are a few tips to encourage your children to eat fruits and vegetables, some things to avoid doing, and a few strategies you might choose to employ.
    • Sonic Pest Repellents

      Aflitto, Nicholas; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-10)
      Sonic pest devices are tools that emit sound in the attempt to repel, deter, or kill unwanted animals such as insects, rodents, birds and large mammals. There are many commercially available sonic pest devices that claim to be effective.Commercially available sonic pest devices for use in residential applications have not been shown to be effective in scientific studies. For this reason, use of these devices is not advised to treat common pest problems. Although some researchers are developing sonic techniques that illustrate promise for very specific pests, these technologies are yet to be commercially available.
    • Pest-proofing Your Home

      Gouge, Dawn H.; Nair, Shaku; Li, Shujuan; Stock, Tim (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-08)
      Many pests encountered in homes and structures can be prevented by using simple techniques collectively known as “pest-proofing”. If done correctly, pest-proofing your home saves you money by reducing pest management costs, and more importantly, reduces potential pesticide exposure. This publication describes general indoor and outdoor pest-proofing measures and some of the major pests encountered in and around homes and structures.
    • Ten Steps to a Successful Vegetable Garden

      DeGomez, Tom; Oebker, Norman F.; Call, Robert E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-02)
      Ten carefully taken steps will produce many enjoyable moments and an abundant harvest of fresh vegetables during much of the year. The ten steps are: 1) Select a good location. 2) Plan your garden layout. 3) Grow recommended varieties. 4) Obtain good seed, plants, equipment and supplies. 5) Prepare and care for the soil properly. 6) Plant your vegetables properly. 7) Irrigate with care. 8) Mulch & cultivate to control weeds. 9) Be prepared for pests and problems. 10) Harvest at peak quality.
    • Working with Non-Profit Organizations – Cooperative Extension’s Opportunity to Expand Its Reach

      Apel, Mark B.; Warren, Peter L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-12)
      This article describes the advantages and benefits of collaborations between Cooperative Extension and non-profit organizations in terms of increasing Extension's outreach capacity and assisting non-profits. Guidelines are provided for Extension personnel interested in working with non-profits.
    • Boys' and Girls' Club Work: Secretary's Minute Book

      Unknown author (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-01-08)
    • Arizona Project WET Water Festivals: A Summative Evaluation

      Schwartz, Kerry; Thomas-Hilburn, Holly; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-07)
      The Make a Splash with Project WET Arizona Water Festival program is in its ninth year and served 12 communities in the 2008-2009 school year. The program trained 622 volunteers to deliver engaging water education to 6,924 fourth graders and their 313 teachers. With the support of the Bureau of Reclamation, Arizona Project WET has conducted a summative evaluation, and is able to use that information to further increase the effectiveness of the program while simultaneously documenting successes in student learning and community engagement in water education.
    • Arizona 4-H Volunteer Handbook

      Shank, Stephanie; Pater, Susan; Astroth, Kirk; Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-03)
      The Arizona 4-H Volunteer Handbook has been designed to guide the volunteer 4-H leader along the way toward developing a successful 4-H club and will help them to become effective 4-H volunteers. The handbook contains information regarding 4-H structure, 4-H policies and procedures and practical information for working with youth and 4-H families.
    • Catch the Rain! Rainwater Harvesting Activities 4-H2O: A Guide for 4-H Leaders and Teachers

      Pater, Susan; Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010)
      A collection of hands-on, interactive activities designed to engage youth in understanding purposes, uses, applications, and designs of rainwater harvesting systems. Together the activities promote a culture of conservation through the development of rainwater harvesting demonstration and use projects, encouragement of community awareness and action, and optimally the reduction of groundwater and surface water use.
    • Stormwater in Arizona

      Pater, Susan; Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010)
      Managing stormwater is important to reduce flooding, keep people safe, maintain clean water, and to reduce soil erosion. Cities have built systems of streets, washes, channels, and stormdrains to manage stormwater and direct it to major washes. Because stormwater drains from small washes to these larger watercourses, keeping stormwater clean is also important. The next time it rains, consider how the rain affects you. Do you want to go outside and play in the raindrops and puddles? What happens to the streets in your neighborhood? Do you live near any washes that flow when it rains? Where does your stormwater go?
    • Integrated Pest Management: The Most Effective Way to Manage Pests in Your School!

      Gouge, Dawn; Green, Tom; Lame, Marc; Shour, Mark; Hurley, Janet; Braband, Lynn; Glick, Sherry; Graham, Fudd; Murray, Kathy; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-09)
    • Essential Elements of the 4-H Youth Experience: Belonging

      Tessman, Darcy; Gressley, Kimberly; Parrott, Amy; Hall, Lani; Family & Consumer Resources, Norton School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-08)
      Youth development is the continual growth process in which all youth are invested in meeting their basic personal and social needs to feel safe, well cared for, valued, useful, and emotionally grounded. Scientists have long studied what youth need to be successful and contributing adults. The purpose of this set of fact sheets is to provide research based information to youth development professionals, volunteers and youth on the four essential elements of positive youth development.
    • Essential Elements of the 4-H Youth Experience: Mastery

      Parrott, Amy; Gressley, Kim; Tessman, Darcy; Hall, Lani; Family & Consumer Resources, Norton School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-08)
      Youth development is the continual growth process in which all youth are invested in meeting their basic personal and social needs to feel safe, well cared for, valued, useful, and emotionally grounded. Scientists have long studied what youth need to be successful and contributing adults. The purpose of this set of fact sheets is to provide research based information to youth development professionals, volunteers and youth on the four essential elements of positive youth development.
    • Essential Elements of the 4-H Youth Experience: Generosity

      Hall, Lani; Tessman, Darcy; Gressley, Kimberly; Parrott, Amy; Family & Consumer Resources, Norton School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-08)
      Youth development is the continual growth process in which all youth are invested in meeting their basic personal and social needs to feel safe, well cared for, valued, useful, and emotionally grounded. Scientists have long studied what youth need to be successful and contributing adults. The purpose of this set of fact sheets is to provide research based information to youth development professionals, volunteers and youth on the four essential elements of positive youth development.
    • Essential Elements of the 4-H Youth Experience: Overview

      Gressley, Kimberly; Tessman, Darcy; Parrott, Amy; Hall, Lani; Family & Consumer Resources, Norton School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-08)
      Youth development is the continual growth process in which all youth are invested in meeting their basic personal and social needs to feel safe, well cared for, valued, useful, and emotionally grounded. Scientists have long studied what youth need to be successful and contributing adults. The purpose of this set of fact sheets is to provide research based information to youth development professionals, volunteers and youth on the four essential elements of positive youth development.
    • Essential Elements of the 4-H Youth Experience: Independence

      Tessman, Darcy; Hall, Lani; Gressley, Kimberly; Parrott, Amy; Family & Consumer Resources, Norton School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-08)
      Youth development is the continual growth process in which all youth are invested in meeting their basic personal and social needs to feel safe, well cared for, valued, useful, and emotionally grounded. Scientists have long studied what youth need to be successful and contributing adults. The purpose of this set of fact sheets is to provide research based information to youth development professionals, volunteers and youth on the four essential elements of positive youth development.
    • Facilitator Guides for Grandparent Discussion Groups

      Tucker, Beth; Family & Consumer Resources, Norton School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-04)
      Grandparents-raising-grandchildren discussion groups may conduct their meetings by a) focusing on issues that members suggest and/or b) choosing from among a list of critical topics that are common issues to most grandparents. Sometimes, discussion group facilitators want help identifying topics that are both reliable and educational. To fill the need for conversation-starting topics, we have provided a series of discussion topics for a facilitator's reference. These discussion topics have been gathered from KKONA's experience listening to the issues grandparents bring up about raising grandchildren. Some of the best group discussions introduce a topic after grandparents have attended a related workshop or training that allows grandparents to process information that they have heard or read. Following through with a discussion topic will help the group more deeply explore the issue and gather grandparents' ideas. The themes of the discussion topics include legal issues, relationship issues, discipline, schools, accessing social services and recordkeeping. There are eighteen topics. The sources for these materials include research and parenting materials as well as practical recommendations gathered from discussion groups. As you use these sheets, remember that they are intended to spark discussion and give you some reliable references. The sheets are not meant to be a step-by-step method for conducting your discussion groups nor do they provide in-depth information.
    • Jean Jems: Simple Sewing Projects made by recycling old blue jeans

      Tessman, Darcy; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-08)
      "Jean Jems" is a simple sewing project guide for 4-H youth. All projects utilized recycled blue jeans to allow youth to learn sewing skills on inexpensive fabric. Projects advance from very simple to more involved.