• The Test Tube Baby: Out of Reach or Out of Luck? A Retrospective Look at the Impact of Basal FSH and Age on In Vitro Fertilization Success in a Clinic Operating Without Laboratory Value Thresholds or Age Limits?

      Padrnos, Leslie; The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix; McGaughey, Robert (The University of Arizona., 2011-03)
      Objective: To assess the impact of age and FSH on IVF outcomes in an assisted reproductive technology clinic that does not have treatment thresholds based on age or laboratory FSH values. Design: Retrospective cohort study Setting: The Arizona Center For Fertility Studies in Phoenix, AZ Patient(s): Women who sought fertility treatment (with the exclusion of patients using donor or frozen oocytes) ages 18-50, representing a total of 1388 IVF cycles Intervention(s): IVF using nondonor embryos Main Outcome Measure(s): Live-birth rate per cycle started Result(s): A total of 1388 IVF cycles with autologous oocytes were analyzed to determine the impact of basal FSH and age on therapy outcomes. The pregnancy rates for individuals 18-34 years old were not significantly different and ranged from 41.1% to 34%. Pregnancy rates for individuals aged 35-39 years old exhibited a reduced pregnancy rate that ranged from 24.7% to 19.8%. For the eldest patients, a significant reduction in pregnancy rates was demonstrated with patients over the age of 40 having a pregnancy rate of 14.3%, and for those 41 years old and 42 and older having pregnancy rates of 7% and 6% respectively. The live birth rate also mirrored this trend with the youngest age group having a live birth rate of 38.9% and the eldest group of individuals aged 42-50 years having a live birth rate of 3.4%. While increasing FSH levels were associated with reduced numbers of oocytes retrieved and transferred during the IVF procedures, there was no statistically significant reduction in pregnancy rate or live birth rate in those with elevated basal FSH levels. Conclusion: The data analysis revealed that increasing age in this population does correlate with decreasing successful outcomes in IVF. At ages 36 and 40 years, there are significant reductions in pregnancy rate. At ages 38 and 40, there are significant reductions in live birth rate. Interestingly, there were no significant differences in pregnancy rate or live birth rate based on basal FSH level.