Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorHendrickson, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorSIEGEL-CAUSEY, DOUGLAS.*
dc.creatorSIEGEL-CAUSEY, DOUGLAS.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T16:08:00Z
dc.date.available2011-09-23T16:08:00Z
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/143037
dc.description.abstractThe plankton community of the Gulf of California exist in a transition region from oceanic to neritic habitats, tropical to warm-temperature waters that is strongly influenced by a complex hydrography and bathymetry. Hyperiid Amphipods were chosen as a focus of this study to elucidate the various forces that shape the distributions of the entire community. To test how strongly hyperiids select water of a particular type (the "Water Mass" hypothesis), multiple regression analysis was applied to species' distributions and station hydrography. The quantitative results indicate that there is a strong relation between the distribution of a given hyperiid and the location of discrete water bodies in the Gulf of California. Three linked gyral currents, powered by a tidally-driven interval wave have been hypothesized to influence phytoplankton distributions in the Gulf. Through both qualitative and quantitative statistical analysis, these gyres are shown to be quite important in structuring species' distributions and have a strong effect on the character of the Gulf hydrography. Significant change in community diversity are found to occur only at the boundaries of these gyres. Many authors consider hyperiid amphipods as obligate parasites upon gelatinous zooplankton, and not worthy of distributional analyses. Both qualitative and quantitative test of this hypothesized relationship between hyperiid and "host" offer little support for the concept of hyperiid amphipods as parasites. Instead, there is considerable evidence that hyperiids are "substrate-bound," as are most amphipods, and use gelatinous zooplankton as facultative, transient hosts. Being able to switch hosts as desired, hyperiids can select for optimum conditions, and can serve to model the zooplankton community as a whole.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsAll rights reserved.en_US
dc.subjectHyperiidaeen_US
dc.subjectMarine plankton -- Mexico -- California, Gulf ofen_US
dc.subjectPlankton populationsen_US
dc.subjectAmphipoda -- Mexico -- California, Gulf ofen_US
dc.titleFACTORS DETERMINING THE DISTRIBUTION OF HYPERIID AMPHIPODA IN THE GULF OF CALIFORNIA.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc683269332en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberManrique, F. A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchreiber, J. F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMiller, W. B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8304727en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-17T17:32:00Z
html.description.abstractThe plankton community of the Gulf of California exist in a transition region from oceanic to neritic habitats, tropical to warm-temperature waters that is strongly influenced by a complex hydrography and bathymetry. Hyperiid Amphipods were chosen as a focus of this study to elucidate the various forces that shape the distributions of the entire community. To test how strongly hyperiids select water of a particular type (the "Water Mass" hypothesis), multiple regression analysis was applied to species' distributions and station hydrography. The quantitative results indicate that there is a strong relation between the distribution of a given hyperiid and the location of discrete water bodies in the Gulf of California. Three linked gyral currents, powered by a tidally-driven interval wave have been hypothesized to influence phytoplankton distributions in the Gulf. Through both qualitative and quantitative statistical analysis, these gyres are shown to be quite important in structuring species' distributions and have a strong effect on the character of the Gulf hydrography. Significant change in community diversity are found to occur only at the boundaries of these gyres. Many authors consider hyperiid amphipods as obligate parasites upon gelatinous zooplankton, and not worthy of distributional analyses. Both qualitative and quantitative test of this hypothesized relationship between hyperiid and "host" offer little support for the concept of hyperiid amphipods as parasites. Instead, there is considerable evidence that hyperiids are "substrate-bound," as are most amphipods, and use gelatinous zooplankton as facultative, transient hosts. Being able to switch hosts as desired, hyperiids can select for optimum conditions, and can serve to model the zooplankton community as a whole.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_td_8304727_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
11.91Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
azu_td_8304727_sip1_m.pdf

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record