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dc.contributor.advisorBeudert, Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.authorShipe, Rebecca
dc.creatorShipe, Rebeccaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-07T22:54:54Zen
dc.date.available2011-10-07T22:54:54Zen
dc.date.issued2011en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/144371en
dc.description.abstractThis study examines how experiences with art promote healthy cultural identities of self and others, and focuses on the potentially mutual benefits to Peace Corps Volunteers (PCVs) and youth living in developing countries. As a returned Peace Corps Volunteer (RPCV) and current elementary art teacher, I combine personal insight with multicultural art education discourse to create a curriculum intended for PCVs to implement during their service. In order to gain relevant feedback on the curriculum's theoretical basis and potential usefulness, I conduct a focus group composed of six RPCVs whose primary or secondary Peace Corps project involved art education or youth development. While examining the critical relationship between the curriculum's meta-narrative, frame narrative, and task narrative, in addition to the unpredictable circumstances Peace Corps service inevitably entails, research findings expose the complex nature of cross-cultural pedagogy. In order to achieve the curriculum's intended goals, implications include emphasizing the PCV's dual role as the facilitator and participant.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectart educationen_US
dc.subjectcross-cultural encountersen_US
dc.subjectcurriculum narrativeen_US
dc.subjectfocus groupen_US
dc.subjectPeace Corpsen_US
dc.titlePromoting Cross-Cultural Understandings Through Art: A Suggested Curriculum for Peace Corps Volunteersen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.identifier.oclc752261463en
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShin, Ryanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGarber, Elizabethen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11604en
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArt Educationen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-18T03:49:01Z
html.description.abstractThis study examines how experiences with art promote healthy cultural identities of self and others, and focuses on the potentially mutual benefits to Peace Corps Volunteers (PCVs) and youth living in developing countries. As a returned Peace Corps Volunteer (RPCV) and current elementary art teacher, I combine personal insight with multicultural art education discourse to create a curriculum intended for PCVs to implement during their service. In order to gain relevant feedback on the curriculum's theoretical basis and potential usefulness, I conduct a focus group composed of six RPCVs whose primary or secondary Peace Corps project involved art education or youth development. While examining the critical relationship between the curriculum's meta-narrative, frame narrative, and task narrative, in addition to the unpredictable circumstances Peace Corps service inevitably entails, research findings expose the complex nature of cross-cultural pedagogy. In order to achieve the curriculum's intended goals, implications include emphasizing the PCV's dual role as the facilitator and participant.


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