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dc.contributor.authorDunn, Darrell Scott.
dc.creatorDunn, Darrell Scott.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-11T09:49:43Z
dc.date.available2011-10-11T09:49:43Z
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/144641
dc.description.abstractPostoperative infections are one of the most feared complications following orthopedic implant procedures. Bacterial infections occur in approximately 1-2% of the patients who undergo orthopedic implant surgery. Treatment of these infections is typically done by administering antibiotics either locally or systemically. Systemic release of antibiotics from bone cement has been reasonably successful. However, it would also be desirable to develop a method of antibiotic release from porous coated implants designed for osseointegration. The principal objective of this research was to explore the feasibility of using anodizing (electrochemical oxidation) as a surface modification technique to facilitate the attachment of antibiotics to commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) and Ti-6Al-4V orthopedic implant materials. In particular the effect of anodizing conditions on the characteristics of the oxide coating such as thickness, composition and porosity has been investigated. Using microbiological methods, the efficacy of in-vitro attachment of antibiotics to anodized surfaces was determined.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subject.lcshBioadhesive drug delivery systemsen_US
dc.subject.lcshMetals - Anodic oxidationen_US
dc.subject.lcshBiomedical materialsen_US
dc.subject.lcshBiomedical engineeringen_US
dc.titleCharacterization and evaluation of anodized commercially pure titanium and titanium-aluminum-vanadium alloy surfaces for systemic antibiotic release.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.contributor.chairRaghavan, Srinien_US
dc.identifier.oclc708396665en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1340283en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMaterials Science and Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-18T10:14:17Z
html.description.abstractPostoperative infections are one of the most feared complications following orthopedic implant procedures. Bacterial infections occur in approximately 1-2% of the patients who undergo orthopedic implant surgery. Treatment of these infections is typically done by administering antibiotics either locally or systemically. Systemic release of antibiotics from bone cement has been reasonably successful. However, it would also be desirable to develop a method of antibiotic release from porous coated implants designed for osseointegration. The principal objective of this research was to explore the feasibility of using anodizing (electrochemical oxidation) as a surface modification technique to facilitate the attachment of antibiotics to commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) and Ti-6Al-4V orthopedic implant materials. In particular the effect of anodizing conditions on the characteristics of the oxide coating such as thickness, composition and porosity has been investigated. Using microbiological methods, the efficacy of in-vitro attachment of antibiotics to anodized surfaces was determined.


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