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dc.contributor.authorBerk, Ari David.
dc.creatorBerk, Ari David.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-11T09:50:05Z
dc.date.available2011-10-11T09:50:05Z
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/144674
dc.description.abstractThe publication of texts describing the first brief Anglo-Indian encounters in Richard Hakluyt's book, Principall Navigations of the English Nation in 1589 was driven by the desire to make complex and descriptive writings both comprehensible and usable to a sixteenth century audience. These texts, while containing valuable ethnographic material, are nonetheless shaped and constrained by the comparative metaphors of their authors. To achieve a high degree of understandability, the English authors of these texts drew extensively upon pre-existing classical and comparative authority. By centering exclusively upon the first contacts between the English and the Indians in the Arctic and Virginia, we may better understand the complexity and problems of description and intelligibility that affected these encounters. This thesis examines the development of ethnographic sensitivity and textual sophistication that give a glimpse into the sixteenth century English mentalities evident in the writings about North American Indians.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titleTo kyngdoms strange...'': An examination of North American Indian ethnographic evidence in Richard Hakluyt's Principal navigations of the English nation (1589)".en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.contributor.chairStauss, Jayen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1361563en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-22T06:46:41Z
html.description.abstractThe publication of texts describing the first brief Anglo-Indian encounters in Richard Hakluyt's book, Principall Navigations of the English Nation in 1589 was driven by the desire to make complex and descriptive writings both comprehensible and usable to a sixteenth century audience. These texts, while containing valuable ethnographic material, are nonetheless shaped and constrained by the comparative metaphors of their authors. To achieve a high degree of understandability, the English authors of these texts drew extensively upon pre-existing classical and comparative authority. By centering exclusively upon the first contacts between the English and the Indians in the Arctic and Virginia, we may better understand the complexity and problems of description and intelligibility that affected these encounters. This thesis examines the development of ethnographic sensitivity and textual sophistication that give a glimpse into the sixteenth century English mentalities evident in the writings about North American Indians.


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