• The Impact of Ozone on Sequoia Seedling Stem Structure: Implications for Seedling Survival

      Telewski, Frank W.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-10-04)
    • Impact of Spruce Budworm on Radial Growth of Trees in Northern New Mexico

      Swetnam, Thomas W.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (1985-02-25)
    • An Inventory of Bristlecone Pine in the Snake, Mount Moriah, Ward Mountain, and Schell Creek Divisions of the Humboldt National Forest

      Klemmedson, James O.; Beasley, R. Scott; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona; Department of Watershed Management, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-10-01)
    • Jojoba Age Determination Needs Help

      Ferguson, C. W.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1977-06)
    • Living With Climatic Change: Proceedings, Toronto Conference Workshop, November 17-22, 1975

      Beltzner, Klaus P. (Science Council of Canada (Ottawa, Canada), 1976-03)
    • Long-Term Reconstruction of Seasonal Temperature and Precipitation in the Yellowstone National Park Region Using Dendroclimatic Techniques

      Douglas, Arthur V.; Stockton, Charles W.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1975-06)
      The goal of this investigation has been the reconstruction of past seasonal climate for the period 1750-1910 (161 years) in the Yellowstone National Park region based upon tree-ring data. Tree-ring series are useful in the reconstruction of past climate owing to the availability of large numbers of trees, the great longevity of trees, and the critical fact that the climatic information they contain is accumulated over specific years. In this project a number of tree-ring series from the region around Yellowstone National Park have been calibrated against short-term (1912-1971) seasonal temperature and precipitation data for Bozeman, Moran, Red Lodge, and Yellowstone Park. From these calibrations, long-term seasonal temperature and precipitation records have been reconstructed for each of the four stations. A major reason for these reconstructions has been the need for long-term climatic data that can be used to indicate potential variations in the climate of the park region. Knowledge of these climatic variations may facilitate estimates of natural food supplies or availability of forage in winter as related to snow depth. Previously such estimates have had to be based upon relatively short-term climatic data which undoubtedly do not encompass all possible climatic variations. With this in mind, a series of precipitation and temperature maps have been produced to indicate some of the seasonal extremes that have probably been experienced since 1750 within a given year or group of years as indicated by the tree -ring data. It is hoped that these maps will be useful to various types of researchers involved in planning within Yellowstone National Park.
    • Long-term Spatial and Temporal Drought Frequency Analysis in Western United States Utilizing Tree Rings

      Stockton, Charles W.; Boggess, W. R.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1980-12)
    • Long-term Spatial and Temporal Drought Frequency Analysis in Western United States Utilizing Tree Rings

      Stockton, Charles W.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1976-07)
      The main purpose of this project has been to increase our understanding of drought history of the western United States through the use of tree rings. Accordingly, we reconstructed the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) in the western United States back to A.D. 1700 from 40 tree-ring series. In addition, we studied the joint occurrence of drought in the western United States and sea surface temperatures (SST) anomalies in the eastern North Pacific. To derive a long term SST record we reconstructed SST off Baja California from tree-ring records in Mexico and the southwestern United States. From a comparison of the SST reconstruction with the PDSI reconstruction we found that anomalously cold SST in spring and early summer appears to be related to large scale spring and summer drought in western United States.
    • Long-Term Streamflow Histories of the Salt and Verde Rivers, Arizona as Reconstructed from Tree-Rings

      Smith, Lawrence P.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1981)
    • A multimillenial temperature reconstruction from far north-eastern Eurasia

      Hughes, Malcolm K.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (1996-07-31)
    • Multivariate Techniques for Specifying Tree-Growth and Climate Relationships and for Reconstructing Anomalies in Paleoclimate

      Fritts, Harold C.; Blasing, Terence J.; Hayden, Bruce P.; Kutzbach, John E.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona; Center for Climatic Research, University of Arizona; Department of Environmental Science, University of Virginia; Department of Environmental Science, University of Virginia (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1970-11-09)
      Ring widths from trees on certain sites reflect climatic variation. Therefore, long time series derived from replicated and precisely dated ring-width chronologies may be utilized to extend climatic records into prehistoric times. Multivariate analyses of tree -ring chronologies from western North America are used to derive response functions from which one can ascertain what climatic information each ring -width chronology contains. In addition, multivariate analyses are utilized to calibrate a large number of ring -width chronologies of diverse response functions and from widely dispersed sites with a large number of regional climatic variables. A series of transfer functions are derived which allow estimates of anomalous climatic variation from tree -ring records. Reconstructions of anomalous variation in atmospheric circulation for portions of the northern hemisphere back to A.D. 1700 are obtained by applying the transfer functions to tree -ring data for time periods when ring data are available but climatic data are not.
    • Navajo Warfare and Economy, 1750-1868

      Kemrer, Meade; Graybill, Donald A.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (University of Alberta (Edmonton, AB), 1970-11)
      Introduction: Dendrochronology has traditionally been employed by archaeologists in a typological sense to provide the necessary spatio-temporal framework for changing attribute or element configurations. In contrast, this paper will stress the potential of dendrochronological analysis as a powerful inferential tool for studying the dynamics of changing human behavior. The most extensive archaeological survey of an ethnically identified population in the American Southwest was conducted between 1953 and 1960 for the Navajo Land Claims Commission. Legally acceptable evidence of Navajo use and occupancy of contested or extra-reservation areas made rigorous time-controls a necessity. These were provided by tree-ring dating, the dating of Navajo ceramics and trade items associated with sites, and through informants who not only knew when sites were occupied, but often the age, sex and clan membership distributions of the former occupants. Criteria for the Navajo identity of structures and features were derived from ethnohistoric research and interviewing Navajos and other persons who had experienced intimate contact with the Navajo people (Littell, 1967).
    • Northern Hemisphere Temperature Estimation Using Blue Group Northern Hemisphere 70-Chronology Set: High Latitude and High Altitude Sites

      LaMarche, Valmore C., Jr.; Cain, Cyra J.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986)
    • Past Occurrences of Winters Similar to 1976-1977 as Reconstructed from the Tree-Ring Record

      Lofgren, G. Robert; Fritts, Harold C.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1977-10)
    • Patterns of Climatic Change Revealed Through Dendroclimatology

      Fritts, Harold C.; Lofgren, G. Robert; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1978-10)
      The objectives of this report are, first, to summarize the findings to date of the dendroclimatic work performed by our research team at the University of Arizona with respect to the broad patterns of climatic variations over North America since 1600 AD. A secondary objective, as stated in the contract, is to select set(s) of those past climatic patterns which most closely resemble or provide a perspective for conditions of climatic variability expressed as possessing a substantial degree of mobility of occurrence by the National Defense University (1978) study of climatic changes.
    • Precipitation and Saguaro Growth

      Hastings, James Rodney; Institute of Atmospheric Physics, University of Arizona (Office of Arid Land Studies, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1961)
    • Preparation and Analysis of Tree-Ring Specimens From Washington State, USA

      Thompson, Marna Ares; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1981-11-09)
      The purpose of this project has been to produce tree-ring chronologies from increment cores of Pinus ponderosa collected from an area in Washington State south of the Trail, British Columbia copper smelter. The cores were collected by Carl Fox, now of Southern California Edison, Rosemead, California, in 1977 and delivered to the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research in 1980. We began work on the project in July, 1981 when funding became available from the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. According to Carl Fox, the cores were collected from seven sites, three control sites and four pollution sites. We successfully dated cores from all the control sites, but from only two of the pollution sites. We have produced five site chronologies from the dated cores. However, we suggest that because of the nature of the chronologies, the individual core and tree chronologies comprising the site chronologies may provide more meaningful information than the site chronologies for subsequent analyses of the data.
    • Projected Effects of Climatic Variation Upon Water Availability in Western United States (Final Report)

      Stockton, Charles W.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1984-10)
    • Projected Effects of Climatic Variation Upon Water Availability in Western United States (Progress Report)

      Stockton, Charles W.; Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1983-07)
    • Publications of the Faculty, College of Mines, and the Staff, Arizona Bureau of Mines (1966-1967)

      University of Arizona. College of Mines. (College of Mines, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1967)