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dc.contributor.authorKhan, Maria Mohammad
dc.creatorKhan, Maria Mohammaden_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-19T18:56:50Z
dc.date.available2011-10-19T18:56:50Z
dc.date.issued2010-05
dc.identifier.citationKhan, Maria Mohammad. (2010). Computational Biology in the Analysis of Epigenetic Nuclear Self-Organization (Bachelor's thesis, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA).
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/146042
dc.description.abstractThe function of the nucleus is central to the survival of cells and thus life as a whole. Among other processes, it is the site of gene expression, DNA repair, and genome stability. These functions are carried in the context of a complex nuclear architecture. The nucleus is compartmentalized both spatially and functionally. These compartments are proteinaceous nuclear bodies or chromatin domains, both of which are not segregated from other compartments by membranes-as are the organelles of cells. Specifically, proteinaceous nuclear bodies are characterized as regions within the nucleus with distinct sets of inhabitant proteins. Examples of such proteinaceous nuclear bodies include the nucleolus, splicing factor compartments, and the Cajal body. The nucleolus is the location of the transcription and processing of ribosomal RNA and the Cajal body is the site of snRNP assembly, while the splicing factor compartments are a storage and assembly site for spliceosomal components.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.titleComputational Biology in the Analysis of Epigenetic Nuclear Self-Organizationen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular and Cellular Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-17T13:33:43Z
html.description.abstractThe function of the nucleus is central to the survival of cells and thus life as a whole. Among other processes, it is the site of gene expression, DNA repair, and genome stability. These functions are carried in the context of a complex nuclear architecture. The nucleus is compartmentalized both spatially and functionally. These compartments are proteinaceous nuclear bodies or chromatin domains, both of which are not segregated from other compartments by membranes-as are the organelles of cells. Specifically, proteinaceous nuclear bodies are characterized as regions within the nucleus with distinct sets of inhabitant proteins. Examples of such proteinaceous nuclear bodies include the nucleolus, splicing factor compartments, and the Cajal body. The nucleolus is the location of the transcription and processing of ribosomal RNA and the Cajal body is the site of snRNP assembly, while the splicing factor compartments are a storage and assembly site for spliceosomal components.


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