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dc.contributor.authorHay-Roe, Jillian Veronica
dc.creatorHay-Roe, Jillian Veronicaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-19T20:30:36Z
dc.date.available2011-10-19T20:30:36Z
dc.date.issued2010-05
dc.identifier.citationHay-Roe, Jillian Veronica. (2010). Kangaroo Care as Analgesic for Preterm Infants Undergoing Heel Sticks (Bachelor's thesis, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA).
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/146071
dc.description.abstractMore than half a million infants are born preterm each year in the United States. Preterm infants often undergo many painful procedures starting minutes after birth. A preterm infant may have as many as 10 painful procedures in a 24 hour period. The experience of pain leads to negative physiological responses, creating additional risks for the preterm infants' immediate and long-term health. Research demonstrates that infants are often undertreated for pain. Kangaroo care is a promising, non-pharmacologic analgesic, implemented as skin-to-skin contact between the infant and a caregiver. The purpose of this paper is to review relevant research about the use of kangaroo care as pain management for preterm infants, and to present a proposal for implementing and evaluating a best practice protocol for kangaroo care as an analgesic in a neonatal intensive care unit.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.titleKangaroo Care as Analgesic for Preterm Infants Undergoing Heel Sticksen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-14T00:24:15Z
html.description.abstractMore than half a million infants are born preterm each year in the United States. Preterm infants often undergo many painful procedures starting minutes after birth. A preterm infant may have as many as 10 painful procedures in a 24 hour period. The experience of pain leads to negative physiological responses, creating additional risks for the preterm infants' immediate and long-term health. Research demonstrates that infants are often undertreated for pain. Kangaroo care is a promising, non-pharmacologic analgesic, implemented as skin-to-skin contact between the infant and a caregiver. The purpose of this paper is to review relevant research about the use of kangaroo care as pain management for preterm infants, and to present a proposal for implementing and evaluating a best practice protocol for kangaroo care as an analgesic in a neonatal intensive care unit.


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