• Feed Wheat Variety Demonstration in Graham County, 1989

      Clark, L. J.; Cluff, R. E.; Ottman, Michael; Kingdon, Lorraine (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-09)
      Two wheat varieties were grown in Graham county as a follow -up to a previous field demonstration. AC79-97, a red wheat developed by the University of Arizona for the Safford area, yielded 6719 pounds per acre, compared with 6359 pounds per acre for Super-X. The protein differential made the crop values even more important than the yield comparison. AC79-97 produced $454 per acre, compared to $423 for Super-X. Using two year's data, AC79-97 produced 85 more pounds of protein per acre than Super-X, with a protein supplement replacement value of $28 per acre.
    • Forage Production of Four Crops Grown Under Two Different Irrigation Cultures

      Sheedy, M.; Ottman, M.; Ramage, T.; Ottman, Michael; Kingdon, Lorraine (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-09)
    • High Rates of Sewage Sludge in Barley Production

      Day, A. D.; Solomon, M. A.; Ottman, M. J.; Taylor, B. B.; Ottman, Michael; Kingdon, Lorraine (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-09)
      A greenhouse experiment was conducted at the University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, to study the effects of liquid sewage sludge loading rates on the vegetative growth, yield, and quality of barley grain and straw. Vegetative growth, grain yields, and straw yields were similar whether barley was grown with inorganic N or equivalent amounts of plant-available N from sewage sludge. Sewage sludge loading rates higher than three times the recommended plant-available N rate decreased barley stands in the seedling stage. The loss of stand was compensated for by higher tillering later in the season. High sludge loading rates tended to delay maturity, increase tillering and increase straw yield; however, they did not affect grain yield. Concentrations of cadmium (Cd), copper, (Cu), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn) in barley grain and straw and the amounts of heavy metals recovered in the soil following each harvest were similar to the control for all sewage sludge treatments.
    • High Rates of Sewage Sludge in Wheat Production

      Day, A. D.; Solomon, M. A.; Ottman, M. J.; Taylor, B. B.; Ottman, Michael; Kingdon, Lorraine (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-09)
      A greenhouse experiment was conducted at the University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, to study the effects of sewage sludge loading rates on the vegetative growth, yield, and heavy metal contents of wheat grain and straw. Vegetative growth, grain and straw yields were similar whether wheat was fertilized with the recommended rate of inorganic N (112 kg/ha) or equivalent amounts of plant-available N from sewage sludge. Sewage sludge loading rates higher than three times the recommended plant- available N level delayed maturity and decreased wheat stands in the seedling stage; however, grain and straw yields were similar for all sewage sludge loading rates. Concentrations of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn) in wheat grain and straw and in the soil following each harvest were low and similar for all fertilizer treatments.
    • Improved Regrowth Salt Tolerance in Alfalfa

      Johnson, D. W.; Smith, S. E.; Dobrenz, A. K.; Ottman, Michael; Kingdon, Lorraine (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-09)
    • Interpretation of Basal Stem Nitrate-N Concentrations for Improved Nitrogen Management in Irrigated Durum Wheat Production

      Knowles, T.; Doerge, T.; Ottman, M.; Ottman, Michael; Kingdon, Lorraine (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-09)
      Attempts to characterize nitrogen (N) status of irrigated spring wheat by using basal stem nitrate - N (NO₃⁻N) tissue tests have shown contradictory results, due to the wide range of agronomic conditions existing in Arizona. Seven N fertility trials were conducted at the Maricopa and Safford Agricultural Centers over the 1985-88 crop years to examine the effects of N rate, N fertilizer form, residual soil N, soil texture and contrasting varieties on basal stem NO₃⁻N concentrations, yield and quality of irrigated durum wheat. Fertilizer N treatments were broadcast at planting then at the 5-6 leaf, boot and anthesis growth stages to simulate fertigation in conjunction with the first four basin irrigation events. Stem tissue samples were taken from all plots at the 3-4 leaf 5-6 leaf joint, boot and anthesis growth stages for NO₃⁻N analysis with a nitrate electrode. Diagnostic levels for durum wheat basal stem tissue NO₃⁻N tests at these growth stages are presented.
    • Oat Variety Grain and Forage Yield Trials at the Maricopa Agricultural Center 1989

      Sheedy, M.; Ottman, M.; Ramage, T.; Ottman, Michael; Kingdon, Lorraine (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-09)
    • Pinto Bean Variety Trials in Graham and Greenlee Counties, 1988

      Clark, L. J.; DeRosa, E.; Schwenneson, E.; Cluff, R. E.; Ottman, Michael; Kingdon, Lorraine (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-09)
      Two pinto bean variety trials were grown in Greenlee and southern Graham counties. UI 114, the most commonly grown variety in both areas, was out yielded in both locations by other varieties. In Greenlee county, Luna, a New Mexico variety, surpassed UI 114 by approximately 100 pounds per acre. In Graham county, Olathe, a Colorado variety, out yielded UI 114 by more than 250 pounds per acre. At $40 per hundredweight, the latter difference translates into more than $100 per acre.
    • Possible New Annual Leguminous Forages for Arizona

      Smith, S. E.; Graves, W. L.; Conta, D. M.; Ottman, Michael; Kingdon, Lorraine (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-09)
    • Progress in the Development of Salt Tolerance in Alfalfa

      McKimmie, T.; Dobrenz, A. K.; Malchow, P. L.; Ottman, Michael; Kingdon, Lorraine (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-09)
      Increasing crop salt tolerance can mean higher yields on irrigated farmland and salt -affected soils. Three cycles of selection were made for growth of alfalfa seedlings under 7500 ppm NaCl. Comparison of parent and selected populations was made for yield and germination under saline conditions. Yield of the last cycle was significantly improved. Germination of the last two cycles was higher than that of the parent and cycle 1.
    • Small Grain Variety Comparisons at the Maricopa Agriculutral Center, 1989

      Sheedy, M.; Ottman, M.; Ramage, T.; Ottman, Michael; Kingdon, Lorraine (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-09)
    • Variability in Salt Tolerance within a Population of Alflafa

      McKimmie, T.; Dobrenz, A. K.; Ottman, Michael; Kingdon, Lorraine (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-09)
      Genetic variability must exist for a selection program to be successful. Alfalfa seedlings were selected for salt tolerance after six weeks growth at 7500 ppm NaCl. The selection criteria considered plant height and survival. Variability for each factor within a population of alfalfa was shown. Both criteria were important and facilitated selection from those parents which contributed most to the salt tolerance of the population.
    • Wheat and Durum Variety Trial in Poston, 1989

      Winans, S. S.; Ottman, M. J.; Doerge, T. A.; Ottman, Michael; Kingdon, Lorraine (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-09)
    • Wheat Irrigation Scheduling at the Safford Agricultural Center, 1989

      Clark, L. J.; Carpenter, E. W.; Ottman, Michael; Kingdon, Lorraine (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1989-09)
      Wheat irrigations were scheduled using two computer models and an infrared thermometer, using three critical threshold values. Yields from these plots were compared with plots scheduled by the farm manager. The highest yield was obtained by the computer model using evapotranspiration data taken from the local AZMET station; this corroborates results from the previous year. The crop coefficients and the irrigation model that have been developed over the past several years are very accurate for this area. The two lower threshold infrared treatments were second and third in yield and had lower water use efficiencies.