• Alfalfa Variety Demonstration at the Safford Agricultural Center, 1984-1986

      Clark, Lee; Cluff, Ronald, E.; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Twenty non- dormant and very non -dormant alfalfa varieties were compared over three seasons. A very non -dormant variety Pioneer 5929 yielded the most during the 1986 season, with a yield approaching 12 tons per acre in six cuttings.
    • Alfalfa Variety Trial in Greenlee County, 1986

      Clark, Lee; DeRose, Edith; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Ten alfalfa varieties ranging from very non -dormant to moderately dormant were tested. No statistically significant differences were seen. The highest yielding variety yielded more than seven tons per acre, considerably better than the county average of 5.5 tons per acre.
    • Corn Variety Trial in Bonita, Graham County, 1986

      Clark, Lee; Cluff, Ronald, E.; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Fourteen corn hybrids were tested, only one of which had previously been evaluated in University tests. Yields, stands, moisture in the grain at harvest, net value of the crop (after subtracting drying costs) and other agronomic data were determined. The top -yielding hybrid, Pioneer 3183, produced 11,942 pounds per acre but produced about $2 per acre less than the highest valued variety, DeKalb 656, which produced $460.54 per acre.
    • Corn Variety Trial in Greenlee County, 1986

      Clark, Lee; DeRose, Edith; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Ten varieties of 115 to 125 day corn hybrids were tested in an on going variety trial in Greenlee county. Drying costs were also calculated to not only determine the top- yielding variety but also the variety having the highest net value after subtracting drying costs. Pioneer 3183 ranked top in both categories.
    • Double-Crop Grain Sorghum Variety Trial, Graham County, 1986

      Clark, Lee; Cluff, Ronald, E.; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Nine medium to medium -late maturing grain sorghum hybrids were compared for yield, percent moisture at harvest, bushel weight, plant height, percent bird damage and standability. The highest yielding entry in the trial was a new hybrid from Northrup King (NK 2656). Its yield of 6185 pounds per acre was 11% higher than the most, commonly grown hybrid in the area.
    • Durum Wheat Variety Trials in Cochise, Graham and Greenlee Counties, 1987

      Clark, Lee; Schwennesen, Eric; Cluff, Ronald, E.; DeRosa, Edith; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Aldura, Westbred Turbo and Westbred 881 were grown in four sites in three counties (Graham, Greenlee and Cochise) in southeastern Arizona to determine which would produce the largest income per acre. At an assumed 75 cent premium for Westbred 881 over a base of $5.25 per hundredweight, Aldura and Westbred Turbo generally out produced Westbred 881. Relative yields of the three varieties are shown for all locations.
    • Effects of N and P Applications on Wheat Stem Nitrate and Phosphate Levels, and Grain Production in Graham County

      Knowles, Tim; Doerge, Thomas; Ottman, Mike; Clark, Lee; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Obtaining optimal yields of spring wheat in Arizona normally requires applications of fertilizer nitrogen (N), and occasionally phosphorus (P). The University of Arizona currently recommends preplant soil tests for NO₃-N and P, plus periodic stem tissue NO₃-N analyses to predict the N and P needs of wheat. Preplant application of P within the root zone of growing plants is suggested due to the immobility of P in soils. Split applications of N broadcast to dry soil preceding irrigations are generally recommended. Collecting additional data to calibrate and refine current guidelines for interpreting soil and plant test values is an ongoing need in Arizona. An experiment was conducted at the Safford Agricultural Center during the 1986-87 crop year to evaluate the response of "Aldura" durum wheat to banded and broadcast N and P, and split applications of N on a clay loam soil testing low in NO₃-N and available P. Maximum grain yields of over 4,500 lbs./A were obtained by banding of 40 lbs. P₂O₅ /A and 32 lbs. N/A as 16-20-0 at planting and broadcasting 118 lbs. urea-N/A prior to seeding. Stem tissue NO₃-N analyses revealed that N deficient conditions prevailed throughout the growing season in all fertilizer treatments. Treatments in which the preassigned rate of N was split into three applications produced the lowest yields due to serious N deficiency early in the season. The stem NO₃-N tissue test proved accurate in predicting N status and a stem. PO₄-P tissue test seemed reliable in monitoring P nutrition of durum wheat.
    • Grain Sorghum Variety Trial in Greenlee County, 1986

      Clark, Lee; DeRose, Edith; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Eleven full season hybrid grain sorghums, representing seven commercial sources, were grown on a silty clay soil south of Duncan. The test plots were managed the same as the rest of the field planted to DeKalb 69. Grain yields ranging from 6911 to 4546 pounds per acre were obtained, with DeKalb 69 the top yielder.
    • Late Corn Variety Trial in Greenlee County, 1986

      Clark, Lee; DeRose, Edith; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Five corn varieties with maturities varying from 95 to 108 days were grown in a double crop situation following barley. The variety that produced the highest net value (after deducting drying costs) yielded only $194.39 per acre, slightly less than the marginal cost of production.
    • One-Irrigation Barley Observations in Graham and Cochise Counties, 1987

      Clark, Lee; Young, Deborah; Schwennesen, Eric; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      A series of experimental plots was planted because ranchers, conservationists, farmers and homeowners in southeastern Arizona were interested in knowing more about one -irrigation barleys. The results of these observations are contained in this paper.
    • Predicting the Nitrogen Requirements of Irrigated Durum Wheat in Graham County Using Soil and Nitrate Analysis

      Doerge, Thomas; Knowles, Tim; Ottman, Mike; Clark, Lee; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      The high yielding spring wheats grown in Arizona usually require applications of fertilizer nitrogen (N) to achieve optimum grain yields and acceptable quality. The University of Arizona's currently recommended procedure (preplant soil plus periodic stem tissue analysis for NO₃-N to predict the N needs of wheat) is not widely used by Graham County growers for various reasons. A nitrogen fertility trial was conducted at the Safford Agricultural Center during the 1986-87 crop year to: 1) examine the relationships between basal stem nitrate-N levels, grain yields of durum wheat, and N fertilizer rates; and 2) to test the accuracy of the recommended procedure for predicting the N needs of durum wheat. Five rates of N from O to 419 lbs N /acre were applied in three split applications. One additional N treatment was made as indicated by the current University of Arizona procedure. Maximum grain yields of 5500 to 6200 lbs /a and protein levels in excess of 14.5% were attained with the application of at least 186 lbs NIA. An untimely early season irrigation induced a temporary N deficiency condition for all plots, which may have kept grain yields below the maximum yield possibility for this site. In spite of this, the amount of N predicted by the University of Arizona procedure (197 lbsN/acre) did attain an adjusted economic return which was not significantly different from the maximum numerical yield that was achieved for any of the other N treatments.
    • Response of Alfalfa to Phosphorus Fertilizer Sources

      Stroehlein, Jack; Clark, Lee; DeRosa, Edith; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      A field study was carried out to determine the effects of different fertilizers on yield and quality of alfalfa. Two harvests over a period of four cuttings did not reveal any differences due to treatment. While alfalfa often responds to phosphorus (P) fertilizer application, conditions in this study provided adequate P as well as nitrogen (N) and potassium (K).
    • Winter Wheat Variety Trial in Cochise County, 1987

      Clark, Lee; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Sixteen winter wheat varieties (including three hybrids) were evaluated in a randomized, complete block experiment, with four replications. Stephens, the standard variety grown in the area, was outyielded by four of the winter wheat cultivars, including two of the hybrids. The highest yielding cultivar was a hybrid, Bounty 100, which yielded 5853 pounds per acre (23% higher than Stephens).