• Barley Grain Grown with Dried Sewage Sludge

      Day, Arden; Thompson, Rex; Swingle, Spencer; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      A four-year experiment, conducted at the Mesa Agricultural Center, studied the use of dried sewage sludge from the City of Phoenix as a source of plant nutrients in the commercial production of barley grain. The objective was to compare the effects of sewage sludge and commercial fertilizer on barley growth, grain yield, and quality. Three fertilizer treatments were used: (1) suggested rates of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) in Arizona; (2) dried sewage sludge to supply plant-available N in amounts equal to the suggested rate; and (3) N, P, and K from inorganic fertilizers, in amounts equal to those in sewage sludge. Characteristics of barley growth, grain yield, and quality were similar for the three fertilizer treatments. Barley can use the fertilizer nutrients in dried sewage sludge to produce grain as effectively as it can utilize the fertilizer nutrients in inorganic fertilizer.
    • Effects of Sewage Sludge on the Yield and Quality of Wheat Grain and Straw

      Day, Arden; Swingle, Spencer; Taylor, Brooks; Pepper, Ian; Minnich, Martha; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Experiments were conducted in Avra Valley, Arizona, to study the use of digested liquid sewage sludge as a source of plant nutrients in the commercial production of grain and straw from wheat. Wheat grown with the recommended amount of plant -available nitrogen from sewage sludge produced the same grain yield as wheat grown with the same amount of nitrogen from inorganic fertilizer. Wheat grain and straw grown with sewage sludge and inorganic fertilizer had similar livestock feeding qualities. Fertilizing wheat with sewage sludge delayed maturity.
    • Effects of Sewage Sludge on Wheat Forage Production

      Day, Arden; Swingle, Spencer; Taylor, Brooks; Pepper, Ian; Minnich, Martha; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Experiments were conducted in Avra Valley, Arizona, to study the use of digested liquid sewage sludge as a source of plant nutrients in the commercial production of green-chopped feed and hay from wheat. Wheat grown with the recommended amount of plant-available nitrogen from sewage sludge produced more green-chopped feed and hay than did wheat grown with the same amount of nitrogen from inorganic fertilizer. Wheat green-chopped feed and hay grown with sewage sludge and inorganic fertilizer had similar livestock feeding qualities. Fertilizing wheat with sewage sludge delayed maturity.
    • Response of Barley and Wheat to Sewage Sludge Loading Rates

      Day, Arden; Solomon, Mengste; Taylor, Brooks; Pepper, Ian; Minnich, Martha; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the responses of barley and wheat to sewage sludge loading rates of 150 to 750 lb /acre plant-available N and to recommended inorganic N (150 lb/ acre). All sewage sludge rates delayed maturity in both barley and wheat. Sludge loading rates up to 450 lb /acre of plant-available N increased vegetative growth and grain yield in both crops. Sludge rates higher than 450 lb/acre of plant-available N resulted in a reduction in the number of plants per pot; however, the stand reduction was greater for wheat than for barley.
    • Seeding Rate and Row Spacing for Westbred 881 and Aldura Durum Wheat at Maricopa, 1987

      Ottman, Mike; Day, Arden; Harper, John; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Westbred 881 durum wheat commands a premium price due to its superior quality, but produces a lower yield than other commonly grown commercial cultivars. This study was initiated to improve our understanding of how best to manage Westbred 881. Two durum wheat cultivars (Westbred 881 and Aldura) were planted at 5 seeding rates (30, 60, 120, 180, and 240 lbs. seed/A), 5 row spacings (3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 inches), and two planting dates (Dec. 1 and Jan. 16) at the Maricopa Agricultural Center. Both cultivars produced optimum yields at seeding rates of 120 to 180 lbs/A for the Dec. 1 planting date. At the Jan. 16 planting date, however, yields of Westbred 881 increased linearly with seeding rate up to 240 lbs/A, while Aldura produced optimum yields between 120 and 180 lbs. seed/A. At the Dec. 1 planting date, Aldura produced similar yields at row spacings from 3 to 12 inches, while the yield of Westbred 881 decreased linearly with an increase in row spacing. The highest yield achieved in this study was with Westbred 881 at the 3 -inch row spacing. Row spacings of 6 to 12 inches were optimum for both Westbred 881 and Aldura at the Jan. 16 planting date. The seeding rate and row spacing responses attained with Westbred 881 may be related to its tittering characteristics.