• Alfalfa Varieties and Experimentals: Yield Evaluation Progress Report, Maricopa Agricultural Center, 1987

      Thompson, Rex; Sheedy, Michael; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
    • Alfalfa Variety Demonstration at the Safford Agricultural Center, 1984-1986

      Clark, Lee; Cluff, Ronald, E.; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Twenty non- dormant and very non -dormant alfalfa varieties were compared over three seasons. A very non -dormant variety Pioneer 5929 yielded the most during the 1986 season, with a yield approaching 12 tons per acre in six cuttings.
    • Alfalfa Variety Trial in Greenlee County, 1986

      Clark, Lee; DeRose, Edith; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Ten alfalfa varieties ranging from very non -dormant to moderately dormant were tested. No statistically significant differences were seen. The highest yielding variety yielded more than seven tons per acre, considerably better than the county average of 5.5 tons per acre.
    • The Effect of Gypsum and Sulfuric Acid Soil Amendments on the Yield of Alfalfa and Soil Infiltration Rates: A Progress Report

      Harper, John; Watson, Jack; Doerge, Tom; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
    • Genetic Gains and Stability for Germination Salt Tolerance in Alfalfa

      Poteet, David; Robinson, David; Smith, Steve; Dobrenz, Albert; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Improving the germination salt tolerance of alfalfa will help this crop endure both increasingly saline irrigation water and salt build -up in the soil. Seven previous cycles of selection for salt tolerance at germination plus the parental line, Mesa-Sirsa, were evaluated for percentage germination under various levels of NaCI solutions. Germination improved linearly from the earliest to the latest cycle of selection. Germination salt tolerance can be improved through recurrent selection techniques.
    • Oxyflourfen (Goal) for Selective Control of Little Malva in Seedling Alfalfa

      Thacker, Gary; Heathman, Stan; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Little Malva (Malva porviflora L.) is an important weed that is resistant to herbicides that will selectively control most other broadleaf weeds in alfalfa. Oxyfluorfen (Goal) has been placed under an Experimental Use Permit for alfalfa. In 1987, this herbicide was evaluated for the selective control of malva in alfalfa in the Avra Valley west of Tucson. Oxyfluorfen stunted both the malva and the alfalfa. However, the alfalfa was stunted to a lesser degree, and had begun to recover three weeks after the application of oxyfluorfen. The malva did not recover, and the alfalfa was relieved from weed competition three weeks after treatment.
    • PEG-Induced Stress on Alfalfa Seedlings

      Ellsworth, Todd; Robinson, David; Dobrenz, Albert; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
    • Performance of Germination Salt Tolerant Alfalfa on a Non-Saline Site

      Smith, Steve; Conta, Debra; Dobrenz, Albert; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
    • Response of Alfalfa to Phosphorus Fertilizer Sources

      Stroehlein, Jack; Clark, Lee; DeRosa, Edith; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      A field study was carried out to determine the effects of different fertilizers on yield and quality of alfalfa. Two harvests over a period of four cuttings did not reveal any differences due to treatment. While alfalfa often responds to phosphorus (P) fertilizer application, conditions in this study provided adequate P as well as nitrogen (N) and potassium (K).
    • Salt Tolerance During Seedling Establishment in Alfalfa

      McKimmie, Tim; Dobrenz, Albert; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Deposition of salts from irrigation water is an increasing concern for Arizona farmers and agronomists. Selection for salt tolerance during the seedling stage has been undertaken over the past three years. Yield tests were conducted in greenhouses and a significant increase in dry matter production was shown in the selected material.
    • Seedling Alfalfa Root Research

      Reffruschinni, Katie; Robinson, David; Dobrenz, Albert; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      There has been limited research on the rooting patterns of alfalfa. This information would be important in developing new germplasm sources that are more water efficient, salt tolerant and drought tolerant. Ten alfalfa varieties were evaluated for possible genetic control of rooting traits. Seedlings were grown hydroponically in a growth chamber. The cultivars evaluated showed a significant statistical difference for width of lateral root system and number of lateral roots. The variation in seedling rooting patterns is sufficient to warrant a selection program for improved lateral rooting patterns.
    • Strain Crossing for Large-Leaflet Alfalfa: A First Look

      Dobrenz, Albert; Robinson, David; Smith, Steve; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
    • Yield Comparisons of Alfalfa Cultivars and Experimentals at Maricopa and Yuma, 1986 to July 1987

      Ottman, Mike; Smith, Steve; Tickes, Barry; Harper, John; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      This study is part of an ongoing effort on evaluate alfalfa cultivar performance at various locations in Arizona. Forage yields of 25 alfalfa cultivars and experimentals were measured at the Maricopa and Yuma -Mesa Agricultural Centers. During the time period reported, many of the newer cultivars were more productive than the popular cultivar CUF 101 . Selection of alfalfa cultivars should be based upon fall dormancy, pest resistance, seed cost, and yield potential.