• Barley Grain Grown with Dried Sewage Sludge

      Day, Arden; Thompson, Rex; Swingle, Spencer; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      A four-year experiment, conducted at the Mesa Agricultural Center, studied the use of dried sewage sludge from the City of Phoenix as a source of plant nutrients in the commercial production of barley grain. The objective was to compare the effects of sewage sludge and commercial fertilizer on barley growth, grain yield, and quality. Three fertilizer treatments were used: (1) suggested rates of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) in Arizona; (2) dried sewage sludge to supply plant-available N in amounts equal to the suggested rate; and (3) N, P, and K from inorganic fertilizers, in amounts equal to those in sewage sludge. Characteristics of barley growth, grain yield, and quality were similar for the three fertilizer treatments. Barley can use the fertilizer nutrients in dried sewage sludge to produce grain as effectively as it can utilize the fertilizer nutrients in inorganic fertilizer.
    • Winter Wheat Variety Trial in Cochise County, 1987

      Clark, Lee; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Sixteen winter wheat varieties (including three hybrids) were evaluated in a randomized, complete block experiment, with four replications. Stephens, the standard variety grown in the area, was outyielded by four of the winter wheat cultivars, including two of the hybrids. The highest yielding cultivar was a hybrid, Bounty 100, which yielded 5853 pounds per acre (23% higher than Stephens).
    • Durum Wheat Variety Trials in Cochise, Graham and Greenlee Counties, 1987

      Clark, Lee; Schwennesen, Eric; Cluff, Ronald, E.; DeRosa, Edith; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Aldura, Westbred Turbo and Westbred 881 were grown in four sites in three counties (Graham, Greenlee and Cochise) in southeastern Arizona to determine which would produce the largest income per acre. At an assumed 75 cent premium for Westbred 881 over a base of $5.25 per hundredweight, Aldura and Westbred Turbo generally out produced Westbred 881. Relative yields of the three varieties are shown for all locations.
    • Grain Sorghum Variety Trial in Greenlee County, 1986

      Clark, Lee; DeRose, Edith; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Eleven full season hybrid grain sorghums, representing seven commercial sources, were grown on a silty clay soil south of Duncan. The test plots were managed the same as the rest of the field planted to DeKalb 69. Grain yields ranging from 6911 to 4546 pounds per acre were obtained, with DeKalb 69 the top yielder.
    • Stomatal Response to Water Stress in Two Pearl Millet Genotypes

      Osman, Mohamoud; Dobrenz, Albert; Tewolde, Haile; Voigt, Robert; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      A study was conducted in the field to test whether stomatal sensitivity to water stress can be used as a selection criterion for drought tolerance in two pearl millet genotypes. In both cultivars, stomatal aperture was significantly reduced by the water stress. However, the proportion of reduction per 20 mm decrease in applied water was much higher for the hybrid than for the female parent. This is clearly an indication of a higher stomatal sensitivity in the hybrid, which probably explains the superior performance under water stress that was previously observed in this genotype.
    • Corn Variety Trial in Bonita, Graham County, 1986

      Clark, Lee; Cluff, Ronald, E.; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Fourteen corn hybrids were tested, only one of which had previously been evaluated in University tests. Yields, stands, moisture in the grain at harvest, net value of the crop (after subtracting drying costs) and other agronomic data were determined. The top -yielding hybrid, Pioneer 3183, produced 11,942 pounds per acre but produced about $2 per acre less than the highest valued variety, DeKalb 656, which produced $460.54 per acre.
    • Late Corn Variety Trial in Greenlee County, 1986

      Clark, Lee; DeRose, Edith; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Five corn varieties with maturities varying from 95 to 108 days were grown in a double crop situation following barley. The variety that produced the highest net value (after deducting drying costs) yielded only $194.39 per acre, slightly less than the marginal cost of production.
    • Russian Wheat Aphid, Diuraphis noxia (Mordvillko): A New Insect Pest of Small Grains in Arizona

      Dick, Gary; Moore, Leon; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
    • Dryland Catchment Test Planted to Hybrid Sorghum and Pearl Millet in Avra Valley Near Three Points, 1986

      Thacker, Gary; Voigt, Robert; Schmalzel, Carl; Ottman, Mike; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
    • Wheat Variety Demonstration in Roll, 1987

      Tickes, Barry; Ottman, Mike; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
    • Response of Alfalfa to Phosphorus Fertilizer Sources

      Stroehlein, Jack; Clark, Lee; DeRosa, Edith; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      A field study was carried out to determine the effects of different fertilizers on yield and quality of alfalfa. Two harvests over a period of four cuttings did not reveal any differences due to treatment. While alfalfa often responds to phosphorus (P) fertilizer application, conditions in this study provided adequate P as well as nitrogen (N) and potassium (K).
    • Strain Crossing for Large-Leaflet Alfalfa: A First Look

      Dobrenz, Albert; Robinson, David; Smith, Steve; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
    • Response of Barley and Wheat to Sewage Sludge Loading Rates

      Day, Arden; Solomon, Mengste; Taylor, Brooks; Pepper, Ian; Minnich, Martha; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the responses of barley and wheat to sewage sludge loading rates of 150 to 750 lb /acre plant-available N and to recommended inorganic N (150 lb/ acre). All sewage sludge rates delayed maturity in both barley and wheat. Sludge loading rates up to 450 lb /acre of plant-available N increased vegetative growth and grain yield in both crops. Sludge rates higher than 450 lb/acre of plant-available N resulted in a reduction in the number of plants per pot; however, the stand reduction was greater for wheat than for barley.
    • Oat Hay Variety Evaluation

      Harper, John; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
    • One-Irrigation Barley Observations in Graham and Cochise Counties, 1987

      Clark, Lee; Young, Deborah; Schwennesen, Eric; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      A series of experimental plots was planted because ranchers, conservationists, farmers and homeowners in southeastern Arizona were interested in knowing more about one -irrigation barleys. The results of these observations are contained in this paper.
    • Seeding Rate and Row Spacing for Westbred 881 and Aldura Durum Wheat at Maricopa, 1987

      Ottman, Mike; Day, Arden; Harper, John; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Westbred 881 durum wheat commands a premium price due to its superior quality, but produces a lower yield than other commonly grown commercial cultivars. This study was initiated to improve our understanding of how best to manage Westbred 881. Two durum wheat cultivars (Westbred 881 and Aldura) were planted at 5 seeding rates (30, 60, 120, 180, and 240 lbs. seed/A), 5 row spacings (3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 inches), and two planting dates (Dec. 1 and Jan. 16) at the Maricopa Agricultural Center. Both cultivars produced optimum yields at seeding rates of 120 to 180 lbs/A for the Dec. 1 planting date. At the Jan. 16 planting date, however, yields of Westbred 881 increased linearly with seeding rate up to 240 lbs/A, while Aldura produced optimum yields between 120 and 180 lbs. seed/A. At the Dec. 1 planting date, Aldura produced similar yields at row spacings from 3 to 12 inches, while the yield of Westbred 881 decreased linearly with an increase in row spacing. The highest yield achieved in this study was with Westbred 881 at the 3 -inch row spacing. Row spacings of 6 to 12 inches were optimum for both Westbred 881 and Aldura at the Jan. 16 planting date. The seeding rate and row spacing responses attained with Westbred 881 may be related to its tittering characteristics.
    • Wheat Germplasm Releases by the Agricultural Experiment Station in 1987

      Thompson, Rex; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
    • Wheat and Barley Variety Test at the Bruce Church Range, Poston, 1987

      Winans, Sherwood; Ottman, Mike; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      A wheat and barley test on the Bruce Church Ranch, Poston, Arizona, La Paz County, harvested June 8 & 9, 1987, gave crop and variety performance differences under grower management conditions. The top yielding barley variety was Fiesta, 6990 lbs /ac. The leading durum varieties were Turbo, Gem and Aldura. Durum wheat Westbred 881 was highest in protein (13.7 %). In red wheat varieties, yields ranged from 4660 to 5750 lbs/ac. The top three varieties were Baker, Probred and Yecora Rojo. Baker was highest in protein (14.6 %), followed by Yecora Rojo (14.2%). Continued testing over several years is necessary to assess variety performance under grower management conditions.
    • Yield Comparisons of Alfalfa Cultivars and Experimentals at Maricopa and Yuma, 1986 to July 1987

      Ottman, Mike; Smith, Steve; Tickes, Barry; Harper, John; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      This study is part of an ongoing effort on evaluate alfalfa cultivar performance at various locations in Arizona. Forage yields of 25 alfalfa cultivars and experimentals were measured at the Maricopa and Yuma -Mesa Agricultural Centers. During the time period reported, many of the newer cultivars were more productive than the popular cultivar CUF 101 . Selection of alfalfa cultivars should be based upon fall dormancy, pest resistance, seed cost, and yield potential.
    • Water Stress Indices for Research and Irrigation Scheduling in Pearl Millet

      Teowolde, Haile; Voigt, Robert L.; Osman, Mahamoud; Dobrenz, Albert K.; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      The capability to measure the magnitude of water stress in plants is useful for precision irrigation scheduling and other purposes. This paper reports an evaluation of leaf (TL) and canopy (Tc) temperatures, leaf minus air (TL -Ta) and canopy minus air (Tc -Ta) temperatures, and leaf water stress index (LWSI) and crop water stress index (CWSI) in detecting stress in pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum (L.) Leeke) over two growing seasons. Baselines which were used to compute LWSI and CWSI were obtained. The upper and lower baselines for the Tc data, respectively, were Tc -Ta = 4.10 C and Tc -Ta = 3.87- .2001VPD where VPD is vapor pressure deficit in mbars. For the TL data, the upper and lower baselines, respectively, were TL -Ta = 1.97oC and TL -Ta = 1.308- .03006VPD. Tests against photosynthesis, transpiration, and grain yield showed that LWSI and CWSI are better indices of stress than TL -Ta, Tc -Ta, TL, Tc, or Ta. Average seasonal LWSI and CWSI ranged from approximately 0.03 for non- stressed to 0.80 for stressed plants. The reliability of LWSI and CWSI to detect stress and their relation with grain yield suggested the possibility of using these indices for irrigation scheduling decisions.