• Seeding Rate and Row Spacing for Westbred 881 and Aldura Durum Wheat at Maricopa, 1987

      Ottman, Mike; Day, Arden; Harper, John; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Westbred 881 durum wheat commands a premium price due to its superior quality, but produces a lower yield than other commonly grown commercial cultivars. This study was initiated to improve our understanding of how best to manage Westbred 881. Two durum wheat cultivars (Westbred 881 and Aldura) were planted at 5 seeding rates (30, 60, 120, 180, and 240 lbs. seed/A), 5 row spacings (3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 inches), and two planting dates (Dec. 1 and Jan. 16) at the Maricopa Agricultural Center. Both cultivars produced optimum yields at seeding rates of 120 to 180 lbs/A for the Dec. 1 planting date. At the Jan. 16 planting date, however, yields of Westbred 881 increased linearly with seeding rate up to 240 lbs/A, while Aldura produced optimum yields between 120 and 180 lbs. seed/A. At the Dec. 1 planting date, Aldura produced similar yields at row spacings from 3 to 12 inches, while the yield of Westbred 881 decreased linearly with an increase in row spacing. The highest yield achieved in this study was with Westbred 881 at the 3 -inch row spacing. Row spacings of 6 to 12 inches were optimum for both Westbred 881 and Aldura at the Jan. 16 planting date. The seeding rate and row spacing responses attained with Westbred 881 may be related to its tittering characteristics.
    • Strain Crossing for Large-Leaflet Alfalfa: A First Look

      Dobrenz, Albert; Robinson, David; Smith, Steve; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
    • Wheat Variety Demonstration in Roll, 1987

      Tickes, Barry; Ottman, Mike; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
    • Oat Hay Variety Evaluation

      Harper, John; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
    • Effects of N and P Applications on Wheat Stem Nitrate and Phosphate Levels, and Grain Production in Graham County

      Knowles, Tim; Doerge, Thomas; Ottman, Mike; Clark, Lee; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Obtaining optimal yields of spring wheat in Arizona normally requires applications of fertilizer nitrogen (N), and occasionally phosphorus (P). The University of Arizona currently recommends preplant soil tests for NO₃-N and P, plus periodic stem tissue NO₃-N analyses to predict the N and P needs of wheat. Preplant application of P within the root zone of growing plants is suggested due to the immobility of P in soils. Split applications of N broadcast to dry soil preceding irrigations are generally recommended. Collecting additional data to calibrate and refine current guidelines for interpreting soil and plant test values is an ongoing need in Arizona. An experiment was conducted at the Safford Agricultural Center during the 1986-87 crop year to evaluate the response of "Aldura" durum wheat to banded and broadcast N and P, and split applications of N on a clay loam soil testing low in NO₃-N and available P. Maximum grain yields of over 4,500 lbs./A were obtained by banding of 40 lbs. P₂O₅ /A and 32 lbs. N/A as 16-20-0 at planting and broadcasting 118 lbs. urea-N/A prior to seeding. Stem tissue NO₃-N analyses revealed that N deficient conditions prevailed throughout the growing season in all fertilizer treatments. Treatments in which the preassigned rate of N was split into three applications produced the lowest yields due to serious N deficiency early in the season. The stem NO₃-N tissue test proved accurate in predicting N status and a stem. PO₄-P tissue test seemed reliable in monitoring P nutrition of durum wheat.
    • Wheat, Barley and Oats for Forage and Grain Production at the Yuma Valley Agricultural Center, 1986-87

      Tickes, Barry; Ottman, Mike; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      The potential of various types of small grains for winter forage production was investigated in this study. Two varieties of red wheat, durum wheat, barley, and oats were harvested at various stages. Harlan if barley produced the most forage at the early cutting while Mesa oats yielded the most forage at the later cutting. Gustoe barley produced the highest grain yields.
    • Performance of Germination Salt Tolerant Alfalfa on a Non-Saline Site

      Smith, Steve; Conta, Debra; Dobrenz, Albert; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
    • Stomatal Response to Water Stress in Two Pearl Millet Genotypes

      Osman, Mohamoud; Dobrenz, Albert; Tewolde, Haile; Voigt, Robert; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      A study was conducted in the field to test whether stomatal sensitivity to water stress can be used as a selection criterion for drought tolerance in two pearl millet genotypes. In both cultivars, stomatal aperture was significantly reduced by the water stress. However, the proportion of reduction per 20 mm decrease in applied water was much higher for the hybrid than for the female parent. This is clearly an indication of a higher stomatal sensitivity in the hybrid, which probably explains the superior performance under water stress that was previously observed in this genotype.
    • Seeding Rate, Nitrogen Rate, and Planting Date of One-Irrigation Barley at Marana, 1987

      Ottman, Mike; Ramage, Tom; Thacker, Gary; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      One-irrigation barleys were bred to be grown with only a single irrigation near planting time. To further our understanding of how to manage these new cultivars, one-irrigation barleys were grown at 4 seeding rates (20, 40, 60, and 80 lbs seed /A), 4 nitrogen rates (0, 50, 100, and 150 lbs/A), and 3 planting dates (Nov. 17, Dec. 15, and Jan. 22). Seeding rates 01 40 to 60 lbs seed/A resulted in the highest yields at the Dec. 15 planting date, comparing all planting dates combined. However, in individual analyses of the Nov. 17 and Jan. 22 planting dates, no significant differences in yield due to seeding rate were detected. Grain yield increased linearly with nitrogen rate at the Nov. 17 planting date, but was not influenced by nitrogen rate at the other planting dates. Yields were similar for the Nov. 17 and Dec. 15 planting dates, but decreased considerably in the Jan. 22 planting date due partially to lower head number. Grain yields of 2-22-9 were consistently higher than Seco this year.
    • Small Grain Variety Comparisons at the Yuma Agricultural Center in 1987

      Thompson, Rex; Sheedy, Michael; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
    • Alfalfa Varieties and Experimentals: Yield Evaluation Progress Report, Maricopa Agricultural Center, 1987

      Thompson, Rex; Sheedy, Michael; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
    • The Effect of Gypsum and Sulfuric Acid Soil Amendments on the Yield of Alfalfa and Soil Infiltration Rates: A Progress Report

      Harper, John; Watson, Jack; Doerge, Tom; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
    • Barley Response to Water and Nitrogen Levels

      Roth, Bob; Gardner, Bryant; Tickes, Barry; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Results from one year's data show that yields of more than five tons per acre are feasible for Fiesta, Gustoe and NKX -1558 barley cultivars. The cultivar Barcott is a shorter season variety; yields were reduced by approximately one ton per acre, compared to the other cultivars. Additional data needs to be collected to verify the amounts of water and nitrogen required for obtaining optimum production.
    • Seedling Alfalfa Root Research

      Reffruschinni, Katie; Robinson, David; Dobrenz, Albert; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      There has been limited research on the rooting patterns of alfalfa. This information would be important in developing new germplasm sources that are more water efficient, salt tolerant and drought tolerant. Ten alfalfa varieties were evaluated for possible genetic control of rooting traits. Seedlings were grown hydroponically in a growth chamber. The cultivars evaluated showed a significant statistical difference for width of lateral root system and number of lateral roots. The variation in seedling rooting patterns is sufficient to warrant a selection program for improved lateral rooting patterns.
    • Alfalfa Variety Trial in Greenlee County, 1986

      Clark, Lee; DeRose, Edith; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Ten alfalfa varieties ranging from very non -dormant to moderately dormant were tested. No statistically significant differences were seen. The highest yielding variety yielded more than seven tons per acre, considerably better than the county average of 5.5 tons per acre.
    • Alfalfa Variety Demonstration at the Safford Agricultural Center, 1984-1986

      Clark, Lee; Cluff, Ronald, E.; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Twenty non- dormant and very non -dormant alfalfa varieties were compared over three seasons. A very non -dormant variety Pioneer 5929 yielded the most during the 1986 season, with a yield approaching 12 tons per acre in six cuttings.
    • Wheat and Barley Variety Test at the Bruce Church Range, Poston, 1987

      Winans, Sherwood; Ottman, Mike; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      A wheat and barley test on the Bruce Church Ranch, Poston, Arizona, La Paz County, harvested June 8 & 9, 1987, gave crop and variety performance differences under grower management conditions. The top yielding barley variety was Fiesta, 6990 lbs /ac. The leading durum varieties were Turbo, Gem and Aldura. Durum wheat Westbred 881 was highest in protein (13.7 %). In red wheat varieties, yields ranged from 4660 to 5750 lbs/ac. The top three varieties were Baker, Probred and Yecora Rojo. Baker was highest in protein (14.6 %), followed by Yecora Rojo (14.2%). Continued testing over several years is necessary to assess variety performance under grower management conditions.
    • Durum Wheat Variety Trials in Cochise, Graham and Greenlee Counties, 1987

      Clark, Lee; Schwennesen, Eric; Cluff, Ronald, E.; DeRosa, Edith; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Aldura, Westbred Turbo and Westbred 881 were grown in four sites in three counties (Graham, Greenlee and Cochise) in southeastern Arizona to determine which would produce the largest income per acre. At an assumed 75 cent premium for Westbred 881 over a base of $5.25 per hundredweight, Aldura and Westbred Turbo generally out produced Westbred 881. Relative yields of the three varieties are shown for all locations.
    • Late Corn Variety Trial in Greenlee County, 1986

      Clark, Lee; DeRose, Edith; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Five corn varieties with maturities varying from 95 to 108 days were grown in a double crop situation following barley. The variety that produced the highest net value (after deducting drying costs) yielded only $194.39 per acre, slightly less than the marginal cost of production.
    • Grain Sorghum Variety Trial in Greenlee County, 1986

      Clark, Lee; DeRose, Edith; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Eleven full season hybrid grain sorghums, representing seven commercial sources, were grown on a silty clay soil south of Duncan. The test plots were managed the same as the rest of the field planted to DeKalb 69. Grain yields ranging from 6911 to 4546 pounds per acre were obtained, with DeKalb 69 the top yielder.