• Predicting the Nitrogen Requirements of Irrigated Durum Wheat in Graham County Using Soil and Nitrate Analysis

      Doerge, Thomas; Knowles, Tim; Ottman, Mike; Clark, Lee; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      The high yielding spring wheats grown in Arizona usually require applications of fertilizer nitrogen (N) to achieve optimum grain yields and acceptable quality. The University of Arizona's currently recommended procedure (preplant soil plus periodic stem tissue analysis for NO₃-N to predict the N needs of wheat) is not widely used by Graham County growers for various reasons. A nitrogen fertility trial was conducted at the Safford Agricultural Center during the 1986-87 crop year to: 1) examine the relationships between basal stem nitrate-N levels, grain yields of durum wheat, and N fertilizer rates; and 2) to test the accuracy of the recommended procedure for predicting the N needs of durum wheat. Five rates of N from O to 419 lbs N /acre were applied in three split applications. One additional N treatment was made as indicated by the current University of Arizona procedure. Maximum grain yields of 5500 to 6200 lbs /a and protein levels in excess of 14.5% were attained with the application of at least 186 lbs NIA. An untimely early season irrigation induced a temporary N deficiency condition for all plots, which may have kept grain yields below the maximum yield possibility for this site. In spite of this, the amount of N predicted by the University of Arizona procedure (197 lbsN/acre) did attain an adjusted economic return which was not significantly different from the maximum numerical yield that was achieved for any of the other N treatments.
    • Inproved Nitrogen Management in Irrigated Wheat Production Using Stem Nitrate Analysis

      Doerge, Thomas; Knowles, Tim; Ottman, Mike; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      The method for predicting the nitrogen (N) requirements of irrigated wheat that is recommended by the University of Arizona requires preplant soil, plus mid-season stem nitrate analysis. Additional information on the relationships between N rates, stem NO₃-N levels and grain yields are needed for the wide range of agronomic conditions typical of Arizona's wheat growing areas. Three N fertility trials were conducted at the Maricopa Agricultural Center to, 1) measure the accuracy of the current University of Arizona procedure on soils of contrasting texture; 2) to evaluate the use of the current stem testing procedure on two durum varieties, "Aldura" and "Westbred-881"; and 3) to evaluate the effect of various N forms on the levels of NO₃-N in stem tissue for wheat grown in a clay loam soil. The University of Arizona procedure was found to over predict slightly the amount of N required for optimum economic return on sandy soils where the maximum yields obtained did not exceed 5100 lbs. grain/a which is considerably below the expected yield possibility for these sites. The procedure accurately predicted the amount of N required for optimum production on a clay loam soil (175 lbs. N/a)at a maximum yield of 6000 lbs. grain /acre. "Aldura" and "Westbred-881" were remarkably similar in their response to a wide range of N applications. There was no significant difference in the yields of these two varieties, but "Westbred-881" did contain somewhat higher protein levels. Little statistical or practical differences were observed in the quantities of N contained in the stem tissue of these two varieties; this should help simplify the interpretation of stem NO₃-N values for various wheat cultivars. The chemical form of N applied to wheat grown in a clay loam soil had no significant effect on the quantity of NO₃-N measured in stem tissue at any time during the growing season. The currently recommended procedure for predicting optimum N fertilization rates in wheat productions shows considerable promise but needs further evaluation, particularly under high - yielding conditions.
    • Barley Response to Water and Nitrogen Levels

      Roth, Bob; Gardner, Bryant; Tickes, Barry; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Results from one year's data show that yields of more than five tons per acre are feasible for Fiesta, Gustoe and NKX -1558 barley cultivars. The cultivar Barcott is a shorter season variety; yields were reduced by approximately one ton per acre, compared to the other cultivars. Additional data needs to be collected to verify the amounts of water and nitrogen required for obtaining optimum production.
    • Effects of Sewage Sludge on the Yield and Quality of Wheat Grain and Straw

      Day, Arden; Swingle, Spencer; Taylor, Brooks; Pepper, Ian; Minnich, Martha; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Experiments were conducted in Avra Valley, Arizona, to study the use of digested liquid sewage sludge as a source of plant nutrients in the commercial production of grain and straw from wheat. Wheat grown with the recommended amount of plant -available nitrogen from sewage sludge produced the same grain yield as wheat grown with the same amount of nitrogen from inorganic fertilizer. Wheat grain and straw grown with sewage sludge and inorganic fertilizer had similar livestock feeding qualities. Fertilizing wheat with sewage sludge delayed maturity.
    • Effects of Sewage Sludge on Wheat Forage Production

      Day, Arden; Swingle, Spencer; Taylor, Brooks; Pepper, Ian; Minnich, Martha; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Experiments were conducted in Avra Valley, Arizona, to study the use of digested liquid sewage sludge as a source of plant nutrients in the commercial production of green-chopped feed and hay from wheat. Wheat grown with the recommended amount of plant-available nitrogen from sewage sludge produced more green-chopped feed and hay than did wheat grown with the same amount of nitrogen from inorganic fertilizer. Wheat green-chopped feed and hay grown with sewage sludge and inorganic fertilizer had similar livestock feeding qualities. Fertilizing wheat with sewage sludge delayed maturity.
    • Response of Barley and Wheat to Sewage Sludge Loading Rates

      Day, Arden; Solomon, Mengste; Taylor, Brooks; Pepper, Ian; Minnich, Martha; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the responses of barley and wheat to sewage sludge loading rates of 150 to 750 lb /acre plant-available N and to recommended inorganic N (150 lb/ acre). All sewage sludge rates delayed maturity in both barley and wheat. Sludge loading rates up to 450 lb /acre of plant-available N increased vegetative growth and grain yield in both crops. Sludge rates higher than 450 lb/acre of plant-available N resulted in a reduction in the number of plants per pot; however, the stand reduction was greater for wheat than for barley.
    • Barley Grain Grown with Dried Sewage Sludge

      Day, Arden; Thompson, Rex; Swingle, Spencer; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      A four-year experiment, conducted at the Mesa Agricultural Center, studied the use of dried sewage sludge from the City of Phoenix as a source of plant nutrients in the commercial production of barley grain. The objective was to compare the effects of sewage sludge and commercial fertilizer on barley growth, grain yield, and quality. Three fertilizer treatments were used: (1) suggested rates of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) in Arizona; (2) dried sewage sludge to supply plant-available N in amounts equal to the suggested rate; and (3) N, P, and K from inorganic fertilizers, in amounts equal to those in sewage sludge. Characteristics of barley growth, grain yield, and quality were similar for the three fertilizer treatments. Barley can use the fertilizer nutrients in dried sewage sludge to produce grain as effectively as it can utilize the fertilizer nutrients in inorganic fertilizer.
    • Durum Wheat Variety and Planting Rate Trial at Marana in 1987

      Thacker, Gary; Ottman, Mike; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Five varieties of durum wheat were evaluated at two different seeding rates, in cooperation with Pacheco Farm Management in Marana. Significant differences between varieties were observed in grain yield, plant height, lodging, bushel weight and protein level. No significant differences in yellow berry were observed between the varieties. The planting rates did not cause significant differences in grain yield nor in any of the other characteristics that were measured. There were no significant variety x planting rate interactions.
    • Seeding Rate and Row Spacing for Westbred 881 and Aldura Durum Wheat at Maricopa, 1987

      Ottman, Mike; Day, Arden; Harper, John; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Westbred 881 durum wheat commands a premium price due to its superior quality, but produces a lower yield than other commonly grown commercial cultivars. This study was initiated to improve our understanding of how best to manage Westbred 881. Two durum wheat cultivars (Westbred 881 and Aldura) were planted at 5 seeding rates (30, 60, 120, 180, and 240 lbs. seed/A), 5 row spacings (3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 inches), and two planting dates (Dec. 1 and Jan. 16) at the Maricopa Agricultural Center. Both cultivars produced optimum yields at seeding rates of 120 to 180 lbs/A for the Dec. 1 planting date. At the Jan. 16 planting date, however, yields of Westbred 881 increased linearly with seeding rate up to 240 lbs/A, while Aldura produced optimum yields between 120 and 180 lbs. seed/A. At the Dec. 1 planting date, Aldura produced similar yields at row spacings from 3 to 12 inches, while the yield of Westbred 881 decreased linearly with an increase in row spacing. The highest yield achieved in this study was with Westbred 881 at the 3 -inch row spacing. Row spacings of 6 to 12 inches were optimum for both Westbred 881 and Aldura at the Jan. 16 planting date. The seeding rate and row spacing responses attained with Westbred 881 may be related to its tittering characteristics.
    • Yield and Water Use of Barley Cultivars Compared Under an Irrigation Water Gradient at Marana, 1987

      Ottman, Mike; Ramage, Tom; Brown, Paul; Thacker, Gary; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      This study was initiated to determine how barley cultivars perform outside the environment for which they were selected. Also, a comparison was made of water use by a one-irrigation barley with water use of a commercial cultivar selected for high yield conditions. Six barley cultivars bred for differing growing conditions (Westbred Gustoe and Westbred Barcott - high input; Arivat and Prato - medium input; and, Seco and 2-22-9 - low input) were compared under 12 water regimes delivered by a line -source sprinkler system. Water use of Seco, a one-irrigation barley, and Westbred Gustoe, a commercial barley, was monitored with a neutron probe. The barley cultivars bred for high, medium, and low input conditions performed best in their respective optimum water levels with the exceptions of Westbred Barcott and Prato. Westbred Barcott (high input) yielded relatively well over all water levels, and Prato (medium input), performed similar to a high input barley. Seco (low input) used slightly less water than Westbred Gustoe (high input), primarily due to its earlier maturity. The water extraction pattern with depth was similar for both cultivars due to the frequent shallow irrigations applied in this study. The water extraction pattern of Seco needs to be investigated under one- irrigation conditions.
    • One-Irrigation Barley Observations in Graham and Cochise Counties, 1987

      Clark, Lee; Young, Deborah; Schwennesen, Eric; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      A series of experimental plots was planted because ranchers, conservationists, farmers and homeowners in southeastern Arizona were interested in knowing more about one -irrigation barleys. The results of these observations are contained in this paper.
    • Seeding Rate, Nitrogen Rate, and Planting Date of One-Irrigation Barley at Marana, 1987

      Ottman, Mike; Ramage, Tom; Thacker, Gary; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      One-irrigation barleys were bred to be grown with only a single irrigation near planting time. To further our understanding of how to manage these new cultivars, one-irrigation barleys were grown at 4 seeding rates (20, 40, 60, and 80 lbs seed /A), 4 nitrogen rates (0, 50, 100, and 150 lbs/A), and 3 planting dates (Nov. 17, Dec. 15, and Jan. 22). Seeding rates 01 40 to 60 lbs seed/A resulted in the highest yields at the Dec. 15 planting date, comparing all planting dates combined. However, in individual analyses of the Nov. 17 and Jan. 22 planting dates, no significant differences in yield due to seeding rate were detected. Grain yield increased linearly with nitrogen rate at the Nov. 17 planting date, but was not influenced by nitrogen rate at the other planting dates. Yields were similar for the Nov. 17 and Dec. 15 planting dates, but decreased considerably in the Jan. 22 planting date due partially to lower head number. Grain yields of 2-22-9 were consistently higher than Seco this year.
    • Russian Wheat Aphid, Diuraphis noxia (Mordvillko): A New Insect Pest of Small Grains in Arizona

      Dick, Gary; Moore, Leon; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
    • Oat Hay Variety Evaluation

      Harper, John; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
    • Wheat, Barley and Oats for Forage and Grain Production at the Yuma Valley Agricultural Center, 1986-87

      Tickes, Barry; Ottman, Mike; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      The potential of various types of small grains for winter forage production was investigated in this study. Two varieties of red wheat, durum wheat, barley, and oats were harvested at various stages. Harlan if barley produced the most forage at the early cutting while Mesa oats yielded the most forage at the later cutting. Gustoe barley produced the highest grain yields.
    • Cost of Producing Wheat in Arizona: 1987 State Summary

      Wade, James; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
    • Oxyflourfen (Goal) for Selective Control of Little Malva in Seedling Alfalfa

      Thacker, Gary; Heathman, Stan; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Little Malva (Malva porviflora L.) is an important weed that is resistant to herbicides that will selectively control most other broadleaf weeds in alfalfa. Oxyfluorfen (Goal) has been placed under an Experimental Use Permit for alfalfa. In 1987, this herbicide was evaluated for the selective control of malva in alfalfa in the Avra Valley west of Tucson. Oxyfluorfen stunted both the malva and the alfalfa. However, the alfalfa was stunted to a lesser degree, and had begun to recover three weeks after the application of oxyfluorfen. The malva did not recover, and the alfalfa was relieved from weed competition three weeks after treatment.
    • Alfalfa Variety Trial in Greenlee County, 1986

      Clark, Lee; DeRose, Edith; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      Ten alfalfa varieties ranging from very non -dormant to moderately dormant were tested. No statistically significant differences were seen. The highest yielding variety yielded more than seven tons per acre, considerably better than the county average of 5.5 tons per acre.
    • Yield Comparisons of Alfalfa Cultivars and Experimentals at Maricopa and Yuma, 1986 to July 1987

      Ottman, Mike; Smith, Steve; Tickes, Barry; Harper, John; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)
      This study is part of an ongoing effort on evaluate alfalfa cultivar performance at various locations in Arizona. Forage yields of 25 alfalfa cultivars and experimentals were measured at the Maricopa and Yuma -Mesa Agricultural Centers. During the time period reported, many of the newer cultivars were more productive than the popular cultivar CUF 101 . Selection of alfalfa cultivars should be based upon fall dormancy, pest resistance, seed cost, and yield potential.
    • Alfalfa Varieties and Experimentals: Yield Evaluation Progress Report, Maricopa Agricultural Center, 1987

      Thompson, Rex; Sheedy, Michael; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1987-09)