• Alfalfa Hay Quality and Dairy Nutrition

      Zaugg, Ned; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-09)
      Alfalfa may be harvested and used as green feed, pellets, haylage, cubes, hays or matured for seed. The value of the product is determined in part by the yield, costs of production, demand and end usage. The high nutrient composition makes this feed a major component of balanced rations. However, its quality is highly variable from production through harvest, storage and feeding.
    • Alfalfa Salt Tolerance from Germination to Establishment

      McKimmie, Tim; Dobrenz, Albert; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-09)
    • Alfalfa Variety Demonstration Safford Agricultural Center, 1985

      Cluff, Ronald; Parsons, David; Thatcher, Max; Clark, Lee; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-09)
    • Alfalfa Variety Trial at the Riggins Farm in Chandler, AZ, 1984-1986

      Dawson, Lester; Parsons, David; Ottman, Michael; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-09)
    • Barley Culivars Compared Under an Irrigation Water Gradient

      Ottman, Mike; Ramage, Tom; Thacker, Gary; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-09)
      The relative ability of barley cultivars to perform outside the environment for which they were selected is not fully known. This study was initiated at Marana in 1985-86 to compare barley cultivars, which were adapted to different input levels, under a line-source sprinkler system that delivered a gradient of water. Higher than average rainfall in February and March provided ample moisture for crop growth, prevented very low water levels and led to the water gradient being applied late in the season when most of the cultivars were in the grain fill stage. We determined that cultivars bred for high level management (Gustoe and Barcott) performed best at the high water levels. Suitable cultivars for minimal water could not be determined since truly low water levels were never attained. Harvest index, the proportion of grain to total plant yield, was greatest for Gustoe at the high water level, but no differences were detected at the low water level. We suspect that one-irrigation barleys, bred to produce grain with a single preplant irrigation, effectively recover water with a deep root system and do not necessarily use less water than other barley cultivars.
    • Barley Variety Test at Rayner Bros, Goodyear, AZ - 1985-86

      Dawson, Lester; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-09)
    • Bread Wheat, Barley and Durum Wheat Evaluated for Double Cropping with Cotton at the University of Arizona Maricopa Agricultural Center in 1986

      Thompson, Rex; Bobula, Jamie; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-09)
    • Break-even Analysis of Durum Wheat Varieties: Price vs. Yield

      Wade, James; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-09)
    • Comparison of Irrigation Scheduling Methods on Wheat

      Biggs, Niel; Clark, Lee; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-09)
      Several improved irrigation scheduling methods are available to farmers to reduce the amount of water used while not reducing crop yield. Each scheduling method has its own advantages and disadvantages. Because of the disadvantages, farmers have been slow in adopting some of the newer irrigation scheduling methods. This study compares two improved scheduling methods, the neutron hydro probe and a simplified bookkeeping method using a personal computer, with the irrigation practices normally used by a farm manager to grow wheat. In addition to the traditional parameters of applied water and yield, the time and difficulty associated with each method were evaluated.
    • Comparison of Preservatives of Alfalfa Hay

      Alhadhrami, Ghaleb Ali; Harper, John; Huber, Tal; Higgenbotham, Gerry; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-09)
    • Crop Yield Variability in Irrigated Wheat

      Husaker, Douglas; Bucks, Dale; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-09)
      Optimum design and management of irrigated wheat production is limited by the scarcity of information available on yield variability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the spatial variability in soil-water parameters and the effects compared to grain yield response under level-basin irrigation. Three levels of seasonal irrigation water and two border lengths were used. Grain yields were found to increase significantly with the amount of water applied and soil water depletion (estimate of crop evapotranspiration), although yield variability was greater with reduced or deficit irrigations. Variations in soil water content were responsible for about 22% of the variability in grain yield, indicating that other soil and crop- related factors had a significant influence on production. Spatial dependence was exhibited over a greater distance at the wetter compared with the drier irrigation regimes.
    • Determining the Economic Damaging Level of the Egyptian Alfalfa Weevil Hypera brunneipennis (Bohemian)

      Cotty, Susanne; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-09)
      An experiment was conducted to ascertain the population level of Egyptian alfalfa weevil Hvpera brunneipennis (EAW) at which chemical control becomes economically justified. Four treatments were established by applying malathion at 1 lb. a.i./acre when an average of 5,10,15, or 20 weevil larvae were found per five sweeps; one treatment was sprayed every week (0 larvae) and the controls received no chemical treatment. Five 180- degree sweeps were taken weekly in each plot with a standard 15 -inch net and net contents were emptied into a white plate for counting. EAW larvae and adults were counted and insecticide was applied when the larval number reached the designated level. Hay from each plot was cut twice manually, air dried and weighed. Significant yield differences (P =0.05) occurred between the 0 larvae treatment and the other treatments for the first cutting but no yield differences occurred for the second cutting.
    • Drought Tolerance in Pearl Millet

      Osman, Mohamoud; Dobrenz, Albert; Tewolde, Haile; Voigt, Robert; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-09)
    • Durum Wheat Variety Trials, Cochise County - 1986

      Clark, Lee; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-09)
    • Early Corn Variety Trial, Greenlee County - 1985

      DeRosa, Edith; Clark, Lee; Parsons, David; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-09)
    • The Effect of Various Soil Amendments on the Yield of Alfalfa and Soil Infiltration Rates

      Harper, John; Watson, Jack; Doerge, Tom; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-09)
    • Effects of Dried Sewage Slude on Barley Grain Production

      Day, Arden; Thompson, Rex; Swingle, Spencer; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-09)
      A four-year experiment was conducted at the Mesa Agricultural Center to study the use of dried sewage sludge from the City of Phoenix as a source of plant nutrients in the commercial production of barley grain. The objective was to compare the effects of sewage sludge and commercial fertilizer on barley growth, grain yield, and quality. Three fertilizer treatments were used: (1) suggested rates of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) in Arizona, (2) dried sewage sludge to supply plant-available N in amounts equal to the suggested rate, and (3) N, P, and K from inorganic fertilizers in amounts equal to those in sewage sludge. Characteristics of barley growth, grain yield, and quality were similar for the three fertilizer treatments. Barley can utilize the fertilizer nutrients in dried sewage sludge in the production of grain as effectively as it can utilize the fertilizer nutrients in inorganic fertilizer.
    • Full Season Grain Sorghum Variety Trial, Greenlee County - 1985

      DeRosa, Edith; Clark, Lee; Parsons, David; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-09)
    • Grain Sorghum Production in South-Central Arizona. I: Full Season, Full Irrigation - 1985

      Voigt, Robert; Schmalzel, Carl; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-09)
      Seventy-two commercial hybrid grain sorghums, representing 20 commercial sources, were grown full season for grain yield with irrigation water applied as necessary to prevent moisture stress. The test, grown at the University of Arizona Marana Agricultural Center, had grain yields ranging from a high of 6375 lbs/acre down to 3292 lbs/acre.
    • Grain Sorghum Production in South-Central Arizona. II: Full Season, Limited Irrigation - 1985

      Voigt, Robert; Schmalzel, Carl; Ottman, Mike (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1986-09)
      Seventy-two commercial hybrid grain sorghums representing 17 commercial seed companies were grown full season for grain yield with limited irrigation for medium moisture stress. The test, grown at the University of Arizona Marana Agricultural Center, had grain yields ranging from a high of 5098 lbs/acre down to 2100 lbs/acre.