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dc.contributor.authorDeGomez, Tom
dc.contributor.authorGarfin, Gregg
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-25T19:33:07Z
dc.date.available2011-10-25T19:33:07Z
dc.date.issued2006-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/146954
dc.description4 pp.en_US
dc.descriptionThis is part of a series on climate variability and forested ecosystemsen_US
dc.description.abstractRecent events in the forests of the Southwest have prompted scientists to consider the role of climate variability in insect and disease cycles. Over 70 million pine trees along with millions of other conifers died in 2002-03. Average temperature increases of 3°C enabled the MPB at those high elevations to achieve univoltine (having one generation per year) reproduction leading to previously unheard of outbreaks in white bark pine at high elevation sites in Idaho.Aspen defoliation in Arizona and New Mexico averaged ~ 20,375 acres from 1990 to 1997. A series of events has contributed to the decline of aspen since 1997.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesUniversity of Arizona Cooperative Extension Publication AZ1418en_US
dc.subjectbark beetleen_US
dc.subjectaspenen_US
dc.subjectpineen_US
dc.subjectpinusen_US
dc.subjectclimate variabilityen_US
dc.subjectglobal climate changeen_US
dc.subjectinsecten_US
dc.subjectinsectsen_US
dc.subjectdiseaseen_US
dc.subjectforesten_US
dc.subjectwoodlanden_US
dc.subjectconifersen_US
dc.titleInsects, Diseases, and Abiotic Disorders in Southwest Forests and Woodlands (Climate Change and Variability in Southwest Ecosystems Series)en_US
dc.typetext
dc.typePamphlet
dc.contributor.departmentNatural Resources & the Environment, School ofen_US
dc.identifier.calsAZ1418-2006
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-14T17:42:06Z
html.description.abstractRecent events in the forests of the Southwest have prompted scientists to consider the role of climate variability in insect and disease cycles. Over 70 million pine trees along with millions of other conifers died in 2002-03. Average temperature increases of 3°C enabled the MPB at those high elevations to achieve univoltine (having one generation per year) reproduction leading to previously unheard of outbreaks in white bark pine at high elevation sites in Idaho.Aspen defoliation in Arizona and New Mexico averaged ~ 20,375 acres from 1990 to 1997. A series of events has contributed to the decline of aspen since 1997.


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