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dc.contributor.advisorNelson, Lawrence O.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBERGMAN, DONALD.
dc.creatorBERGMAN, DONALD.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T16:52:58Zen
dc.date.available2011-10-31T16:52:58Zen
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/183894en
dc.description.abstractThis is a study of selected tasks and responsibilities of chief administrators in overseas schools located throughout East Asia. The degree to which their work related tasks presented problems for them and the identification of in-service training areas constituted the focus of the study. Data were collected by questionnaires from 46 chief school administrators whose schools were members of the East Asia Regional Council of Overseas Schools (EARCOS). The data were analyzed through descriptive statistics to determine the degree to which 92 administrative tasks presented problems for the chief school administrator. The selected administrative tasks encompassed five major areas: personnel, curriculum, school administration and business functions, school setting and pupils. In addition, 25 in-service training areas were prioritized according to the degree of value chief administrators felt they would provide. Specific tasks identified as most problematic were: (a) hiring well-qualified teachers from the local community; (b) locating and acquiring school sites; (c) funding new school buildings; (d) providing substitute teachers; (e) providing current and relevant in-service training for teachers; (f) providing programs for gifted, remedial or handicapped students; (g) constructing new buildings; (h) providing hearing, visual, psychological, or other testing services; (i) soliciting financial support; (j) finding local supply sources. In-service training opportunities in the major area of curriculum were identified as being most valuable and additional course work in preparation for an overseas chief school administrator's position was believed to be beneficial by those currently holding chief school administrator jobs. Specific in-service topics deemed most valuable were: (a) curriculum development procedures and writing of curriculum guides; (b) staff management, faculty morale and leadership techniques; (c) hiring practices, contracts, overseas recruiting and organizations providing support services; (d) teacher evaluation, supervision and dismissal procedures; (e) development and implementation of in-service training and school improvement plans; (f) curriculum alternatives such as International Baccalaureate, ESOL, "A" and "O" levels, and Advanced Placement programs; (g) pupil support services such as counseling, testing services, gifted and remedial programs; (h) methods of communication, public relations techniques and community liaison projects; (i) economics, budget development procedures and school business office and accounting practices; (j) comparative education--evaluating academic programs from various countries.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectSchool administrators -- In-service training.en_US
dc.subjectTeachers, Foreign.en_US
dc.subjectSchools, American -- East Asia.en_US
dc.titleUNIQUE RESPONSIBILITIES AND TRAINING REQUIRED FOR ADMINISTRATORS OF EAST ASIAN AMERICAN AND INTERNATIONAL SCHOOLS (OVERSEAS, INSERVICE).en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc697625657en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGrant, Robert T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGose, Kenneth F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSacken, Donal M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSaunders, Franken_US
dc.identifier.proquest8624355en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.nameEducat.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-22T13:28:39Z
html.description.abstractThis is a study of selected tasks and responsibilities of chief administrators in overseas schools located throughout East Asia. The degree to which their work related tasks presented problems for them and the identification of in-service training areas constituted the focus of the study. Data were collected by questionnaires from 46 chief school administrators whose schools were members of the East Asia Regional Council of Overseas Schools (EARCOS). The data were analyzed through descriptive statistics to determine the degree to which 92 administrative tasks presented problems for the chief school administrator. The selected administrative tasks encompassed five major areas: personnel, curriculum, school administration and business functions, school setting and pupils. In addition, 25 in-service training areas were prioritized according to the degree of value chief administrators felt they would provide. Specific tasks identified as most problematic were: (a) hiring well-qualified teachers from the local community; (b) locating and acquiring school sites; (c) funding new school buildings; (d) providing substitute teachers; (e) providing current and relevant in-service training for teachers; (f) providing programs for gifted, remedial or handicapped students; (g) constructing new buildings; (h) providing hearing, visual, psychological, or other testing services; (i) soliciting financial support; (j) finding local supply sources. In-service training opportunities in the major area of curriculum were identified as being most valuable and additional course work in preparation for an overseas chief school administrator's position was believed to be beneficial by those currently holding chief school administrator jobs. Specific in-service topics deemed most valuable were: (a) curriculum development procedures and writing of curriculum guides; (b) staff management, faculty morale and leadership techniques; (c) hiring practices, contracts, overseas recruiting and organizations providing support services; (d) teacher evaluation, supervision and dismissal procedures; (e) development and implementation of in-service training and school improvement plans; (f) curriculum alternatives such as International Baccalaureate, ESOL, "A" and "O" levels, and Advanced Placement programs; (g) pupil support services such as counseling, testing services, gifted and remedial programs; (h) methods of communication, public relations techniques and community liaison projects; (i) economics, budget development procedures and school business office and accounting practices; (j) comparative education--evaluating academic programs from various countries.


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