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dc.contributor.authorTEAGUE, GEORGE ALLEN.
dc.creatorTEAGUE, GEORGE ALLEN.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T17:00:39Z
dc.date.available2011-10-31T17:00:39Z
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/184168
dc.description.abstractIt is argued that the physical remains of industry are valuable repositories of information about a crucial phase in the development of modern society, and that there are uniquely archeological lines of inquiry useful in retrieving this information. Two schools of archeology are involved in the study of past industry. One is industrial archeology, which focuses on monuments and technology; the other is historical archeology, which is more closely aligned with the social sciences. The historical development of both approaches is examined to determine what makes them different from, or similar to, one another. Studies of common industrial site types, including potteries, glassworks, iron works, mines, and communities, are reviewed, and research themes and traditions are extracted and analyzed. The essential character of industrial sites is delineated, with particular attention to questions of time, scale, and site content. The industrial site and the practice of industrial archeology are redefined. Appropriate and effective data collection techniques are suggested, key research questions are proposed, and criteria for assessing site significance are examined.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectIndustrial archaeology -- United States.en_US
dc.titleTHE ARCHEOLOGY OF INDUSTRY IN NORTH AMERICA.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc698743805en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJelinek, Arthuren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFontana, Bernarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLongacre, Williamen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8726827en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-13T00:44:44Z
html.description.abstractIt is argued that the physical remains of industry are valuable repositories of information about a crucial phase in the development of modern society, and that there are uniquely archeological lines of inquiry useful in retrieving this information. Two schools of archeology are involved in the study of past industry. One is industrial archeology, which focuses on monuments and technology; the other is historical archeology, which is more closely aligned with the social sciences. The historical development of both approaches is examined to determine what makes them different from, or similar to, one another. Studies of common industrial site types, including potteries, glassworks, iron works, mines, and communities, are reviewed, and research themes and traditions are extracted and analyzed. The essential character of industrial sites is delineated, with particular attention to questions of time, scale, and site content. The industrial site and the practice of industrial archeology are redefined. Appropriate and effective data collection techniques are suggested, key research questions are proposed, and criteria for assessing site significance are examined.


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