Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorFox, Rogeren_US
dc.contributor.authorMobula, Meta Lidoga.
dc.creatorMobula, Meta Lidoga.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T17:16:35Z
dc.date.available2011-10-31T17:16:35Z
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/184724
dc.description.abstractThe US government has been actively involved in the production and trade of agricultural products in the world market. Corn as an agricultural product has not been spared. The minimum price for corn has been set above the domestic and world market prices. Such pricing policies have naturally generated surpluses that have been traded in the world market at subsidized prices. At times, the US has used acreage control policy to help reduce the level of excess supply. Price and income subsidies also have been used to complement acreage control policy when surpluses are immense. The empirical results have shown that these interventions have impacted on the world price of corn and subsequently on the foreign exchange earnings of the competing exporting countries. However, the issue of how significant these instabilities have been still remains and is more of a normative issue. The measure of the opportunity costs of these policies has provided an idea of the size of compensation to the competing countries of Argentina and Thailand. The last part of the dissertation investigates on the possible effects of the US policies on the behavior of Argentina and Thailand. The results obtained cannot confirm nor reject the premisses of US policies' harmful impacts. Such inconclusive outcome may be tied back to the inconsistency of the trading policy setting in Argentina and Thailand. Based on economic theory, suggestions have been made regarding the establishment of international stabilization and compensatory schemes to help move the world corn economy toward a Pareto optimal production level.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectCorn -- Prices.en_US
dc.subjectInternational trade.en_US
dc.subjectAgricultural subsidies -- United States.en_US
dc.titleThe impacts of United States agricultural policies on the world price of corn.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702135031en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTaylor, Lesteren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDrabicki, Johnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8919047en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-28T04:09:17Z
html.description.abstractThe US government has been actively involved in the production and trade of agricultural products in the world market. Corn as an agricultural product has not been spared. The minimum price for corn has been set above the domestic and world market prices. Such pricing policies have naturally generated surpluses that have been traded in the world market at subsidized prices. At times, the US has used acreage control policy to help reduce the level of excess supply. Price and income subsidies also have been used to complement acreage control policy when surpluses are immense. The empirical results have shown that these interventions have impacted on the world price of corn and subsequently on the foreign exchange earnings of the competing exporting countries. However, the issue of how significant these instabilities have been still remains and is more of a normative issue. The measure of the opportunity costs of these policies has provided an idea of the size of compensation to the competing countries of Argentina and Thailand. The last part of the dissertation investigates on the possible effects of the US policies on the behavior of Argentina and Thailand. The results obtained cannot confirm nor reject the premisses of US policies' harmful impacts. Such inconclusive outcome may be tied back to the inconsistency of the trading policy setting in Argentina and Thailand. Based on economic theory, suggestions have been made regarding the establishment of international stabilization and compensatory schemes to help move the world corn economy toward a Pareto optimal production level.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_td_8919047_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
4.782Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
azu_td_8919047_sip1_m.pdf

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record