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dc.contributor.advisorFish, Paul R.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorReid, J. Jeffersonen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoth, Barbara June.
dc.creatorRoth, Barbara June.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T17:19:29Z
dc.date.available2011-10-31T17:19:29Z
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/184824
dc.description.abstractThe research discussed in this study involves examining Late Archaic settlement and subsistence practices in the Tucson Basin. The Late Archaic encompasses the time period from 3000 BP until the adoption of ceramics, ca. AD 200, and witness many changes in adaptation including a reduction in residential mobility and the adoption of cultigens. Data from excavations of Late Archaic sites in the Tucson Basin and elsewhere in the southern desert have documented agricultural villages dispersed along major waterways by 2500 BP. Much of the research has been limited to excavation of sites in single environmental zones, primarily the floodplain, however, and limited information on exploitation or occupation of other ecological zones has been available. This study uses a regional data base to examine Late Archaic occupation of all ecological zones in the Tucson Basin. The Tucson Basin Survey, a 100 percent survey of the Northern Tucson Basin, has provided a unique opportunity for interpreting Late Archaic settlement and subsistence. Late Archaic site distributions are analyzed and assemblage and other site data are used to determine potential roles of sites within the Late Archaic settlement system. The Tucson Basin environment is examined to determine its influence on settlement and subsistence practices. Existing models of Late Archaic settlement-subsistence systems are evaluated using the survey data, and three potential settlement-subsistence models are proposed.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectTucson (Ariz.) -- Antiquities.en_US
dc.subjectHohokam culture.en_US
dc.titleLate Archaic settlement and subsistence in the Tucson Basin.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.contributor.chairFish, Paul R.en_US
dc.contributor.chairReid, J. Jeffersonen_US
dc.identifier.oclc703259676en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLongacre, William A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchiffer, Michael B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9004976en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-12T14:30:31Z
html.description.abstractThe research discussed in this study involves examining Late Archaic settlement and subsistence practices in the Tucson Basin. The Late Archaic encompasses the time period from 3000 BP until the adoption of ceramics, ca. AD 200, and witness many changes in adaptation including a reduction in residential mobility and the adoption of cultigens. Data from excavations of Late Archaic sites in the Tucson Basin and elsewhere in the southern desert have documented agricultural villages dispersed along major waterways by 2500 BP. Much of the research has been limited to excavation of sites in single environmental zones, primarily the floodplain, however, and limited information on exploitation or occupation of other ecological zones has been available. This study uses a regional data base to examine Late Archaic occupation of all ecological zones in the Tucson Basin. The Tucson Basin Survey, a 100 percent survey of the Northern Tucson Basin, has provided a unique opportunity for interpreting Late Archaic settlement and subsistence. Late Archaic site distributions are analyzed and assemblage and other site data are used to determine potential roles of sites within the Late Archaic settlement system. The Tucson Basin environment is examined to determine its influence on settlement and subsistence practices. Existing models of Late Archaic settlement-subsistence systems are evaluated using the survey data, and three potential settlement-subsistence models are proposed.


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