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dc.contributor.authorGOSNELL, BLAKE ALAN.en_US
dc.creatorGOSNELL, BLAKE ALAN.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T17:20:42Z
dc.date.available2011-10-31T17:20:42Z
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/184859
dc.description.abstractSeveral feeding-related factors can affect taste sensitivity or preferences and therefore may be part of a homeostatic regulatory mechanism. Cholecystokinin (CCK), a hormone which reduces food intake in several species, has also been postulated to interact with the orosensory characteristics of food. To test this hypothesis, the effects of CCK-8 and food deprivation on the short-term intakes of water, sucrose solutions (0.05 to 1.0 M), and saline solutions (0.05 and 0.15 M) were determined. In most cases, CCK (2 μg/kg) reduced sucrose intake when measured either as the amount consumed or the number of licks in a short period (nine minutes). Additionally, CCK reduced the intake of 0.15 M NaCl in satiated rats and water intake in both hungry and satiated rats. Rats usually consumed more sucrose when hungry than when satiated or fed ad libitum; CCK-induced suppression of intake, however, was generally greater in the satiated or ad libitum conditions than in the hungry condition. There was no systematic effect of sucrose concentration on the amount of CCK-induced suppression of intake, which suggests that CCK regulates rather than interferes with ingestion. To determine whether the CCK-induced suppression is due to a change in the peripheral taste signal, the integrated chorda tympani responses to sucrose and NaCl tastes were recorded in rats anesthetized with either urethane, Innovar-Vet, or a combination of urethane and alpha-chloralose. The only significant effect of CCK was the slight increase in the initial response to 0.3 M sucrose after the infusion of a total of 10 μg of CCK-8 into rats anesthetized with Innovar-Vet. In general, therefore, the effect of CCK on sucrose intake does not appear to be due to a peripheral taste change; an analysis of single taste fibers, however, would be more conclusive. An examination of the effects of CCK on central gustatory and reward areas might yet provide a mechanism for the CCK effect on taste-motivated ingestion.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectCholecystokinin.en_US
dc.subjectGastrointestinal hormones.en_US
dc.subjectIngestion -- Regulation.en_US
dc.subjectAppetite.en_US
dc.titleTASTE PREFERENCE AND SENSITIVITY: EFFECTS OF CHOLECYSTOKININ AND LEVEL OF FOOD DEPRIVATION.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc683257046en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8303388en_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-24T19:47:56Z
html.description.abstractSeveral feeding-related factors can affect taste sensitivity or preferences and therefore may be part of a homeostatic regulatory mechanism. Cholecystokinin (CCK), a hormone which reduces food intake in several species, has also been postulated to interact with the orosensory characteristics of food. To test this hypothesis, the effects of CCK-8 and food deprivation on the short-term intakes of water, sucrose solutions (0.05 to 1.0 M), and saline solutions (0.05 and 0.15 M) were determined. In most cases, CCK (2 μg/kg) reduced sucrose intake when measured either as the amount consumed or the number of licks in a short period (nine minutes). Additionally, CCK reduced the intake of 0.15 M NaCl in satiated rats and water intake in both hungry and satiated rats. Rats usually consumed more sucrose when hungry than when satiated or fed ad libitum; CCK-induced suppression of intake, however, was generally greater in the satiated or ad libitum conditions than in the hungry condition. There was no systematic effect of sucrose concentration on the amount of CCK-induced suppression of intake, which suggests that CCK regulates rather than interferes with ingestion. To determine whether the CCK-induced suppression is due to a change in the peripheral taste signal, the integrated chorda tympani responses to sucrose and NaCl tastes were recorded in rats anesthetized with either urethane, Innovar-Vet, or a combination of urethane and alpha-chloralose. The only significant effect of CCK was the slight increase in the initial response to 0.3 M sucrose after the infusion of a total of 10 μg of CCK-8 into rats anesthetized with Innovar-Vet. In general, therefore, the effect of CCK on sucrose intake does not appear to be due to a peripheral taste change; an analysis of single taste fibers, however, would be more conclusive. An examination of the effects of CCK on central gustatory and reward areas might yet provide a mechanism for the CCK effect on taste-motivated ingestion.


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