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dc.contributor.advisorArmstrong, Neal R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZavadil, Kevin Robert
dc.creatorZavadil, Kevin Roberten_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T17:22:47Z
dc.date.available2011-10-31T17:22:47Z
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/184931
dc.description.abstractThe growing technological application of metallic lithium has produced a greater need to understand its fundamental surface chemical properties. The use of lithium as an anode in high-energy density battery systems represents one application where this knowledge is required to optimize system performance. The surface chemistry of lithium will be discussed in terms of oxidants which represent the reductive half-cell components of these batteries, contaminants present during cell fabrication, and solvents used as the electrolytic medium. These systems have been studied in the low pressure limit ( < 1 millitorr) at atomically clean lithium surfaces using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The lithium/sulfur dioxide system has been singled out for detailed study in order to explore the relationship between gas-phase and solution-phase processes. Electrochemical characterization of the lithium anode has been conducted as a function of controlled surface composition within this system. The ability of lithium to induce corrosion at structural components of these batteries (i.e., glass insulators) has also been investigated. A description of the chemical activity of lithium and its consequence has been developed from these results.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectLithium cellsen_US
dc.subjectElectrochemistryen_US
dc.subjectSurface chemistryen_US
dc.titleElectron spectroscopic and electrochemical investigations of surface reactions of lithium.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703606373en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDenton, M. Bonneren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPemberton, Jeanne E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLicthenberger, Dennis L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBernath, Peteren_US
dc.identifier.proquest9013187en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-22T22:49:59Z
html.description.abstractThe growing technological application of metallic lithium has produced a greater need to understand its fundamental surface chemical properties. The use of lithium as an anode in high-energy density battery systems represents one application where this knowledge is required to optimize system performance. The surface chemistry of lithium will be discussed in terms of oxidants which represent the reductive half-cell components of these batteries, contaminants present during cell fabrication, and solvents used as the electrolytic medium. These systems have been studied in the low pressure limit ( < 1 millitorr) at atomically clean lithium surfaces using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The lithium/sulfur dioxide system has been singled out for detailed study in order to explore the relationship between gas-phase and solution-phase processes. Electrochemical characterization of the lithium anode has been conducted as a function of controlled surface composition within this system. The ability of lithium to induce corrosion at structural components of these batteries (i.e., glass insulators) has also been investigated. A description of the chemical activity of lithium and its consequence has been developed from these results.


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