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dc.contributor.advisorDinham, S.M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPinnegar, Stefinee Esplin.en_US
dc.creatorPinnegar, Stefinee Esplin.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T17:23:16Z
dc.date.available2011-10-31T17:23:16Z
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/184947
dc.description.abstractCurrent research in expert/novice differences in problem solving suggests the need to investigate the domain specific knowledge of people with experience in problem solving in a particular field against the domain specific knowledge of those with less experience. Furthermore, research in teacher thinking makes important assumptions concerning the knowledge teachers of different experience levels have about students, but lacks complete support for those assumptions. This qualitative study addressed both of these issues. It investigated the differences in the knowledge of students and classrooms of twelve high school science teachers with three different levels of experience. Through analysis of the protocols of interviews with experienced, first year, and student teachers at key times during a semester, this study examined patterns of knowledge acquisition among the three groups. Analyses of the protocols revealed four major findings: Patterns and themes in the development of teachers' knowledge of students and classrooms, the role of observation and work in teachers' understanding of students, the role of teacher comprehension in teachers' knowledge of students and the teacher/student relationship. The discontinuity in development between more and less experienced teachers in this study had important implications for teacher education and research.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectTeacher-student relationshipsen_US
dc.subjectInteraction analysis in educationen_US
dc.subjectClassroom environmenten_US
dc.titleTeachers' knowledge of students and classrooms.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703606659en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDoyle, Walteren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCarter, Kathyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9014676en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-14T01:43:12Z
html.description.abstractCurrent research in expert/novice differences in problem solving suggests the need to investigate the domain specific knowledge of people with experience in problem solving in a particular field against the domain specific knowledge of those with less experience. Furthermore, research in teacher thinking makes important assumptions concerning the knowledge teachers of different experience levels have about students, but lacks complete support for those assumptions. This qualitative study addressed both of these issues. It investigated the differences in the knowledge of students and classrooms of twelve high school science teachers with three different levels of experience. Through analysis of the protocols of interviews with experienced, first year, and student teachers at key times during a semester, this study examined patterns of knowledge acquisition among the three groups. Analyses of the protocols revealed four major findings: Patterns and themes in the development of teachers' knowledge of students and classrooms, the role of observation and work in teachers' understanding of students, the role of teacher comprehension in teachers' knowledge of students and the teacher/student relationship. The discontinuity in development between more and less experienced teachers in this study had important implications for teacher education and research.


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