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dc.contributor.advisorZube, Erven_US
dc.contributor.authorSanders, Jeffrey Mark.
dc.creatorSanders, Jeffrey Mark.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T17:23:27Z
dc.date.available2011-10-31T17:23:27Z
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/184953
dc.description.abstractToday there are more than fifty million acres on American Indian reservations and Indian people can determine, to a great extent, what happens on their land. One way Indians can keep the renewable aspect of their land is by considering its use in a nonconsumable way, such as with the creation of parks. This dissertation addresses and analyzes policy and management concerns related to selected parks on the Navajo and Zuni reservations. Any successful venture with Indian people must entail a blend of cultural awareness and sensitivity along with federal-tribal policy and history. To that extent, Indians as ecologists before the arrival of Europeans to this continent, and an extensive review of federal Indian policy is offered. With the establishment of any park certain issues will arise that are significant to the creation and management of the area. The parks analyzed in detail are Monument Valley Tribal Park, Canyon de Chelly National Monument, and the newly established Zuni-Cibola National Historical Park. General processes of management and specific issues of concern are identified and analyzed. Methods of tribal-National Park Service cooperation are discussed. An administrative history of the Navajo Tribal Parks system is also presented.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectIndians of North America -- Southwest, Newen_US
dc.subjectLand use -- Southwest, Newen_US
dc.subjectParks -- Southwest, Newen_US
dc.titleTribal and national parks on American Indian lands.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703619669en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKing, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGregg, Franken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDeloria, Vine, Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMomaday, Scotten_US
dc.identifier.proquest9014681en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-24T20:27:14Z
html.description.abstractToday there are more than fifty million acres on American Indian reservations and Indian people can determine, to a great extent, what happens on their land. One way Indians can keep the renewable aspect of their land is by considering its use in a nonconsumable way, such as with the creation of parks. This dissertation addresses and analyzes policy and management concerns related to selected parks on the Navajo and Zuni reservations. Any successful venture with Indian people must entail a blend of cultural awareness and sensitivity along with federal-tribal policy and history. To that extent, Indians as ecologists before the arrival of Europeans to this continent, and an extensive review of federal Indian policy is offered. With the establishment of any park certain issues will arise that are significant to the creation and management of the area. The parks analyzed in detail are Monument Valley Tribal Park, Canyon de Chelly National Monument, and the newly established Zuni-Cibola National Historical Park. General processes of management and specific issues of concern are identified and analyzed. Methods of tribal-National Park Service cooperation are discussed. An administrative history of the Navajo Tribal Parks system is also presented.


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