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dc.contributor.advisorRodriguez, Nairen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, Hsiu-Jean.
dc.creatorWu, Hsiu-Jean.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T17:24:15Z
dc.date.available2011-10-31T17:24:15Z
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/184981
dc.description.abstractThe objectives of this work are to characterize and model the solvent-mediated phase transformation process of theophylline anhydrous crystals to the monohydrate crystals in an aqueous system. In order to model the transformation, the following processes are taken into account: (1) the dissolution kinetics of theophylline anhydrous crystals, (2) the kinetics of the formation of theophylline monohydrate nuclei, and (3) the growth kinetics of the monohydrate crystals. The driving forces for the above processes are determined from the concentration of theophylline in the solution and the solubilities of theophylline anhydrous and monohydrate. The solubilities of theophylline anhydrous and the monohydrate, and these three distinct processes along with the overall transformation phenomena were investigated in the present study. By using theophylline as a model compound we have gained some understanding of the kinetics of the solvent-mediated phase transformation between the metastable anhydrous form and the stable hydrated form of an organic compound and we were able to model the transformation process. By identifying the mechanisms for nucleation, growth of the hydrate form and the dissolution of the anhydrous form one can predict and control the transformation process. The growth kinetics of thymine monohydrate crystals at various temperatures are also investigated in the present study.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectCrystallization -- Mathematical modelsen_US
dc.subjectCrystal growth -- Mathematical modelsen_US
dc.subjectTheophylline -- Solubilityen_US
dc.subjectThymine -- Solubilityen_US
dc.titleThe kinetics of solvent-mediated phase transformations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703672767en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurke, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVemulapalli, Krishnaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMayersohn, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYalkowsky, Samuelen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9022118en_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePharmaceutical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-22T23:41:27Z
html.description.abstractThe objectives of this work are to characterize and model the solvent-mediated phase transformation process of theophylline anhydrous crystals to the monohydrate crystals in an aqueous system. In order to model the transformation, the following processes are taken into account: (1) the dissolution kinetics of theophylline anhydrous crystals, (2) the kinetics of the formation of theophylline monohydrate nuclei, and (3) the growth kinetics of the monohydrate crystals. The driving forces for the above processes are determined from the concentration of theophylline in the solution and the solubilities of theophylline anhydrous and monohydrate. The solubilities of theophylline anhydrous and the monohydrate, and these three distinct processes along with the overall transformation phenomena were investigated in the present study. By using theophylline as a model compound we have gained some understanding of the kinetics of the solvent-mediated phase transformation between the metastable anhydrous form and the stable hydrated form of an organic compound and we were able to model the transformation process. By identifying the mechanisms for nucleation, growth of the hydrate form and the dissolution of the anhydrous form one can predict and control the transformation process. The growth kinetics of thymine monohydrate crystals at various temperatures are also investigated in the present study.


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