Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorClark, Donald C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAndrews, Minnie Fay.en_US
dc.creatorAndrews, Minnie Fay.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T17:25:59Z
dc.date.available2011-10-31T17:25:59Z
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/185043
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine the effects of the Academic Study Skills Program (ASSP) on 7th grade students' Self-Concept, Academic Aspiration, Academic Anxiety, and Grade Point Averages. The differences on Self-Concept, Academic Aspiration, Academic Anxiety, and Grade Point Averages were compared with students who received the ASSP with students that did not receive the ASSP. Gender comparisons on Self-Concept, Academic Aspiration, Academic Anxiety, and Grade Point Averages were also examined between the students who received the ASSP. The ASSP in this study consists of six components: Organizational Skills, Test Taking Skills, Listening Skills, Time Management Skills, Note Taking Skills, and Following Directions. Each of these skills were taught on a daily basis for a nine week period to one group of students. A second group of students did not receive instruction in the six components of the program as a structured class. The sample consisted of 79 7th grade students. Thirty-two students received the ASSP program. Forty-seven students did not receive any special treatment. Both groups of students were given a pre-test and a post-test. The Academic and Social Environment Scale (ASES) was administered to both groups again nine weeks later. Grade Point Averages for Languages Arts, Math, and Science were computed for each student at the beginning of this nine-week period and at the end of the same nine-week period. The findings of the data analyses did not indicate significant differences between the two groups in the variables examined. However, there were some differences noted between males and females within the ASSP group in the variables of Academic Aspiration and Academic Anxiety. Although the findings of this study did not show the ASSP treatment as having a significant impact on the students in this study, there is enough evidence to suggest that an ASSP can be beneficial to students. Further studies of this nature should be pursued.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectEducationen_US
dc.titleThe effects of an academic study skills program on 7th grade students.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc708252753en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFleming, Margaret B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStreitmatter, Janiceen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9025063en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-23T00:01:23Z
html.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine the effects of the Academic Study Skills Program (ASSP) on 7th grade students' Self-Concept, Academic Aspiration, Academic Anxiety, and Grade Point Averages. The differences on Self-Concept, Academic Aspiration, Academic Anxiety, and Grade Point Averages were compared with students who received the ASSP with students that did not receive the ASSP. Gender comparisons on Self-Concept, Academic Aspiration, Academic Anxiety, and Grade Point Averages were also examined between the students who received the ASSP. The ASSP in this study consists of six components: Organizational Skills, Test Taking Skills, Listening Skills, Time Management Skills, Note Taking Skills, and Following Directions. Each of these skills were taught on a daily basis for a nine week period to one group of students. A second group of students did not receive instruction in the six components of the program as a structured class. The sample consisted of 79 7th grade students. Thirty-two students received the ASSP program. Forty-seven students did not receive any special treatment. Both groups of students were given a pre-test and a post-test. The Academic and Social Environment Scale (ASES) was administered to both groups again nine weeks later. Grade Point Averages for Languages Arts, Math, and Science were computed for each student at the beginning of this nine-week period and at the end of the same nine-week period. The findings of the data analyses did not indicate significant differences between the two groups in the variables examined. However, there were some differences noted between males and females within the ASSP group in the variables of Academic Aspiration and Academic Anxiety. Although the findings of this study did not show the ASSP treatment as having a significant impact on the students in this study, there is enough evidence to suggest that an ASSP can be beneficial to students. Further studies of this nature should be pursued.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
azu_td_9025063_sip1_m.pdf
Size:
2.250Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
azu_td_9025063_sip1_m.pdf

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record