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dc.contributor.advisorHuelsman, Lawrence P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMachibya, Telesphory Raphael.*
dc.creatorMachibya, Telesphory Raphael.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T17:26:56Zen
dc.date.available2011-10-31T17:26:56Zen
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/185075en
dc.description.abstractCircuit designs that employ only CMOS technology are becoming more desirable than those using traditional bipolar integrated circuit technology. This technology offers a high density of MOS circuitry, good capacitor accuracy and high stability. The availability of techniques for the design and realization of precision filters in fully integrated form has many applications in signal processing VLSI circuits. The design, simulation and compensation of MOS transistor filters are presented. The MOS transistor is used as a voltage controlled resistor. The resulting "MOSFET-C" filters can then be built of MOS transistors, capacitors and operational amplifiers fabricated in MOS technology. The advantages of MOSFET-C filters over other integrated filters are discussed. Desirable MOS transistor circuit configurations for use in these filter designs are also presented. High-order, high-frequency, narrow-band bandpass filters are designed and simulated to give a systematic step-by-step design procedure for realizing MOSFET-C filters. These steps include modifying existing well established and studied filter building blocks for use in this method. The nonidealities associated with MOS transistors, especially at high frequencies, are studied and modeled for simulation. Compensation techniques for these nonidealities, together with those of operational amplifiers are presented and applied to both RC and MOSFET-C filters. A compensation scheme is developed which cancels the op amp effects in second-order filter building blocks.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectEngineeringen_US
dc.subjectPhysicsen_US
dc.titleDesign and compensation of high-frequency, narrow-band, bandpass MOSFET-C filters.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc708263612en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberO'Hanlon, John F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPeck, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWait, John V.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9028149en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-23T00:10:26Z
html.description.abstractCircuit designs that employ only CMOS technology are becoming more desirable than those using traditional bipolar integrated circuit technology. This technology offers a high density of MOS circuitry, good capacitor accuracy and high stability. The availability of techniques for the design and realization of precision filters in fully integrated form has many applications in signal processing VLSI circuits. The design, simulation and compensation of MOS transistor filters are presented. The MOS transistor is used as a voltage controlled resistor. The resulting "MOSFET-C" filters can then be built of MOS transistors, capacitors and operational amplifiers fabricated in MOS technology. The advantages of MOSFET-C filters over other integrated filters are discussed. Desirable MOS transistor circuit configurations for use in these filter designs are also presented. High-order, high-frequency, narrow-band bandpass filters are designed and simulated to give a systematic step-by-step design procedure for realizing MOSFET-C filters. These steps include modifying existing well established and studied filter building blocks for use in this method. The nonidealities associated with MOS transistors, especially at high frequencies, are studied and modeled for simulation. Compensation techniques for these nonidealities, together with those of operational amplifiers are presented and applied to both RC and MOSFET-C filters. A compensation scheme is developed which cancels the op amp effects in second-order filter building blocks.


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