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dc.contributor.advisorFriedman, Richard L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMoran, Michael John.
dc.creatorMoran, Michael John.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T17:32:54Z
dc.date.available2011-10-31T17:32:54Z
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/185273
dc.description.abstractThe disease pertussis, more commonly known as whooping cough, is caused by the gram negative bacterium Bordetella pertussis. In order to cause disease, the pathogen produces a battery of potential virulence factors which assist the bacteria in colonizing and surviving in the human host. Among these factors is a soluble adenylate cyclase which is thought to interfere with host immune defenses. The adenylate cyclase toxin, along with several other B. pertussis virulence factors, undergo a phase shift between states of expression and repression. The gene for the adenylate cyclase was isolated by use of transposon tagging to localize the region of the structural gene. In addition, primer extension was done to localize the promoter region of this gene. Studies with this promoter fused to a promoterless galactokinase gene were done in Escherechia coli and demonstrated that the adenylate cyclase promoter was unable to be activated in the heterologous E. coli system.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectBiology.en_US
dc.titleThe adenylate cyclase gene of Bordetella pertussis: Molecular cloning and transcriptional analysis.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc710823284en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberIto, Junetsuen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRyan, Kenneth J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYocum, Daviden_US
dc.identifier.proquest9111957en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiology and Immunologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-01T23:50:10Z
html.description.abstractThe disease pertussis, more commonly known as whooping cough, is caused by the gram negative bacterium Bordetella pertussis. In order to cause disease, the pathogen produces a battery of potential virulence factors which assist the bacteria in colonizing and surviving in the human host. Among these factors is a soluble adenylate cyclase which is thought to interfere with host immune defenses. The adenylate cyclase toxin, along with several other B. pertussis virulence factors, undergo a phase shift between states of expression and repression. The gene for the adenylate cyclase was isolated by use of transposon tagging to localize the region of the structural gene. In addition, primer extension was done to localize the promoter region of this gene. Studies with this promoter fused to a promoterless galactokinase gene were done in Escherechia coli and demonstrated that the adenylate cyclase promoter was unable to be activated in the heterologous E. coli system.


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