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dc.contributor.advisorDallas, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrowne, Michael Patrick.*
dc.creatorBrowne, Michael Patrick.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T17:37:07Z
dc.date.available2011-10-31T17:37:07Z
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/185418
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation I describe the analysis of two types of electronic devices. The first is an image intensifier/photomultiplier combination used in a laser communications receiver. The second type is high resolution display monitors to be used in digital radiology. The analysis of these devices centered on the influence of noise on their performance though I also measured other device characteristics. I present here a method of characterizing noise that can be used for a variety of detector and display devices; however, I concentrated my analysis on an optical communication receiver by ITT and high resolution display monitors by MegaScan, Tektronix and US Pixel. The optical receiver is called a hybrid device because it combines an image intensifier (II) and a photomultiplier tube. The II has a large active area and its specially processed photocathode gives it an extended red response. The photomultiplier tube (PMT) provides a high gain, low noise and low dark current. The hybrid tube had a maximum gain of 8 x 10⁶, a noise factor of 1.64 and an information capacity of 1.3 x 10⁶ bits per second. The high resolution monitors we examined were black and white monitors with a pixel matrix of at least 1024 x 1536 pixels and 256 grey levels. The maximum luminance from the monitors was 88 ft-Lamberts (for the US Pixel monitor) and a maximum information capacity of 8.9 x 10⁶ bits (for the MegaScan monitor). We measured spatial and temporal noise for the monitors. Spatial noise was the dominant noise, except at low grey levels. Veiling glare was evident in all three monitors and dramatically reduced the dynamic ranges of the monitors.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academicen_US
dc.subjectElectrical engineeringen_US
dc.subjectComputer monitorsen_US
dc.titleNoise-limited performance of a hybrid detector and high-resolution display monitors.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc709776072en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGmitro, Arthuren_US
dc.identifier.proquest9123470en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-15T09:13:34Z
html.description.abstractIn this dissertation I describe the analysis of two types of electronic devices. The first is an image intensifier/photomultiplier combination used in a laser communications receiver. The second type is high resolution display monitors to be used in digital radiology. The analysis of these devices centered on the influence of noise on their performance though I also measured other device characteristics. I present here a method of characterizing noise that can be used for a variety of detector and display devices; however, I concentrated my analysis on an optical communication receiver by ITT and high resolution display monitors by MegaScan, Tektronix and US Pixel. The optical receiver is called a hybrid device because it combines an image intensifier (II) and a photomultiplier tube. The II has a large active area and its specially processed photocathode gives it an extended red response. The photomultiplier tube (PMT) provides a high gain, low noise and low dark current. The hybrid tube had a maximum gain of 8 x 10⁶, a noise factor of 1.64 and an information capacity of 1.3 x 10⁶ bits per second. The high resolution monitors we examined were black and white monitors with a pixel matrix of at least 1024 x 1536 pixels and 256 grey levels. The maximum luminance from the monitors was 88 ft-Lamberts (for the US Pixel monitor) and a maximum information capacity of 8.9 x 10⁶ bits (for the MegaScan monitor). We measured spatial and temporal noise for the monitors. Spatial noise was the dominant noise, except at low grey levels. Veiling glare was evident in all three monitors and dramatically reduced the dynamic ranges of the monitors.


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