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dc.contributor.advisorOlson, Stanley J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Jack Stephen.
dc.creatorWilliams, Jack Stephen.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T17:38:31Z
dc.date.available2011-10-31T17:38:31Z
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/185464
dc.description.abstractThe relationship between architecture and defense during the mid-eighteenth to mid-nineteenth centuries in the portion of Hispanic Sonora that later became southern Arizona is examined. Included are a description and analysis of presidio fortifications, and a comparison of these defense works with other kinds of fortified and garrisoned places found in the region. Separate sections offer appraisals of how raw materials, labor, and tools, were used to plan and build frontier strongholds in northern New Spain and early Mexico. Also provided is a description of the weapons and tactics used in the defense of fortified places. An evaluation is made of the role of fortifications in grand strategy. Based on this evidence, it is argued that defense involved a wider variety of institutions than has traditionally been recognized. The survey of defensive sites also indicates that the presidios do not share certain important features. These differences reflect gradual changes in design concepts over time. It is argued that the causes of these modifications are principally the results of shifts in strategy.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectMilitary architecture -- Arizona -- History.en_US
dc.titleArchitecture and defense on the military frontier of Arizona, 1752-1856.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701927849en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOfficer, James E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFontana, Bernard L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9124171en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-26T06:19:41Z
html.description.abstractThe relationship between architecture and defense during the mid-eighteenth to mid-nineteenth centuries in the portion of Hispanic Sonora that later became southern Arizona is examined. Included are a description and analysis of presidio fortifications, and a comparison of these defense works with other kinds of fortified and garrisoned places found in the region. Separate sections offer appraisals of how raw materials, labor, and tools, were used to plan and build frontier strongholds in northern New Spain and early Mexico. Also provided is a description of the weapons and tactics used in the defense of fortified places. An evaluation is made of the role of fortifications in grand strategy. Based on this evidence, it is argued that defense involved a wider variety of institutions than has traditionally been recognized. The survey of defensive sites also indicates that the presidios do not share certain important features. These differences reflect gradual changes in design concepts over time. It is argued that the causes of these modifications are principally the results of shifts in strategy.


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