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dc.contributor.advisorHarrison, Gail G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKhan, Laura Kettel.
dc.creatorKhan, Laura Kettel.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T17:51:11Z
dc.date.available2011-10-31T17:51:11Z
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/185877
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and present food intake and morbidity patterns of obesity in men (n = 162) and women (n = 286) 15 to 80 years of age. Data were collected in a community-based longitudinal study from 1983 to 1985 in a semi-rural Egyptian village. Degree of obesity was estimated using body mass index (BMI) and a derived measure of adiposity from principal components analysis of several anthropometric variables. BMI was significantly correlated with other available measures of adiposity, lean mass and age and uncorrelated with height. Derived measures of adiposity were related to all other measures of relative weight and adiposity in both sexes and related to age in women. Within agricultural households, men were shorter and had higher adiposity levels, and women were taller than non-agricultural households. The presence of chronic disease was unrelated to BMI in men. However, chronic disease and respiratory difficulties occurred more often in overweight and obese women. There was no difference in the prevalence of acute illness for lean and normal weight compared to overweight and obese men. Skin problems occurred more often in overweight and obese women. There was a risk of low pregnancy weight gain across the range of BMI. Obese women produced heavier infants than normal weight or overweight women; overweight women produce heavier infants than leaner women. Infant birthweight was predicted by prepregnancy BMI or adiposity level, pregnancy weight gain and height. For men, animal products contributed to the higher intakes of fat, vitamin A and zinc in overweight and obese, and fats and oils contributed to higher vitamin E intakes. For women, bread contributed to higher intakes of dietary fiber and lower intakes of calcium in overweight and obese.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectNutrition.en_US
dc.subjectObesity in men.en_US
dc.subjectObesity in women.en_US
dc.titleDeterminants and functional consequences of adult obesity in Egyptian men and women.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.identifier.oclc712789290en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRitenbaugh, Cherylen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWeber, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGamal, Adelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGalal, Osman M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9234875en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-23T07:28:06Z
html.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and present food intake and morbidity patterns of obesity in men (n = 162) and women (n = 286) 15 to 80 years of age. Data were collected in a community-based longitudinal study from 1983 to 1985 in a semi-rural Egyptian village. Degree of obesity was estimated using body mass index (BMI) and a derived measure of adiposity from principal components analysis of several anthropometric variables. BMI was significantly correlated with other available measures of adiposity, lean mass and age and uncorrelated with height. Derived measures of adiposity were related to all other measures of relative weight and adiposity in both sexes and related to age in women. Within agricultural households, men were shorter and had higher adiposity levels, and women were taller than non-agricultural households. The presence of chronic disease was unrelated to BMI in men. However, chronic disease and respiratory difficulties occurred more often in overweight and obese women. There was no difference in the prevalence of acute illness for lean and normal weight compared to overweight and obese men. Skin problems occurred more often in overweight and obese women. There was a risk of low pregnancy weight gain across the range of BMI. Obese women produced heavier infants than normal weight or overweight women; overweight women produce heavier infants than leaner women. Infant birthweight was predicted by prepregnancy BMI or adiposity level, pregnancy weight gain and height. For men, animal products contributed to the higher intakes of fat, vitamin A and zinc in overweight and obese, and fats and oils contributed to higher vitamin E intakes. For women, bread contributed to higher intakes of dietary fiber and lower intakes of calcium in overweight and obese.


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