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dc.contributor.authorLuna Solorzano, Maria Isela.
dc.creatorLuna Solorzano, Maria Isela.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-31T17:58:13Z
dc.date.available2011-10-31T17:58:13Z
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/186090
dc.description.abstractSeveral dimensions of acculturation as well as three cultural orientations were incorporated in the development of the measurement of Culture Change in Mexican American Children (CCMAC). The sample included 116 Mexican American children age 7 to 11 years. The research was designed to assess the psychometric properties of the CCMAC, and evaluate the developmental features of the data. The multidimensional concepts as well as the multicultural aspects of acculturation were assessed. In addition, selected health outcomes were examined and their association to cultural orientation was determined. The findings demonstrated that the CCMAC was deemed valid and reliable with an alpha coefficient of.85 for the cultural assimilation scoring,.83 for the cultural resistance scoring, and.67 for the cultural integration scoring system. The confirmatory and exploratory factor analysis did not support the predicted factor structure. Children who were culturally resistant reported the highest income, less school problems, less home problems and a high GPA. Children who were culturally assimilated were the youngest children, had less homework problems, and were of later generation. The theory that culturally integrated children would report the least number of problems was not supported. It was recommended that the CCMAC be scored in three different ways when estimating individual acculturation trends. When estimating group trends, the CCMAC should be scored in the cultural assimilation orientation. Earlier literature was re-examined and discussed in light of the lack of the identification of the predicted factor structure. Recommendations were based on the CCMAC's contributions to the theory of acculturation in school age Mexican American children.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectMexican American children -- Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectAcculturation -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.titleThe psychometric properties of the measurement of culture change in Mexican-American children and its contributions to the theory of acculturation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.contributor.chairFerketich, Sandra L.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc704413620en_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHaase, Joanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDomino, Georgeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPhillips, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWrenn, Robert L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9310599en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-12T17:40:41Z
html.description.abstractSeveral dimensions of acculturation as well as three cultural orientations were incorporated in the development of the measurement of Culture Change in Mexican American Children (CCMAC). The sample included 116 Mexican American children age 7 to 11 years. The research was designed to assess the psychometric properties of the CCMAC, and evaluate the developmental features of the data. The multidimensional concepts as well as the multicultural aspects of acculturation were assessed. In addition, selected health outcomes were examined and their association to cultural orientation was determined. The findings demonstrated that the CCMAC was deemed valid and reliable with an alpha coefficient of.85 for the cultural assimilation scoring,.83 for the cultural resistance scoring, and.67 for the cultural integration scoring system. The confirmatory and exploratory factor analysis did not support the predicted factor structure. Children who were culturally resistant reported the highest income, less school problems, less home problems and a high GPA. Children who were culturally assimilated were the youngest children, had less homework problems, and were of later generation. The theory that culturally integrated children would report the least number of problems was not supported. It was recommended that the CCMAC be scored in three different ways when estimating individual acculturation trends. When estimating group trends, the CCMAC should be scored in the cultural assimilation orientation. Earlier literature was re-examined and discussed in light of the lack of the identification of the predicted factor structure. Recommendations were based on the CCMAC's contributions to the theory of acculturation in school age Mexican American children.


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